Posts Tagged ‘Rebar’

OMG, “Pi In The Sky” is Coming in September! Five Skywriting Planes Flying Over Your Favorite Tech Company

Wednesday, August 15th, 2012

This isn’t for me, but maybe it’s for you.

Presenting “ZERO1 Biennial, Seeking Silicon Valley”

This’ll take place mostly in the San Hoser area, but they’ll have stuff up here in the 415 as well.

All the deets below and after the jump.

And here’s the highlight of the show:

San Francisco designer known as ISHKY is creating a spectacular public artwork called Pi in the Sky. Sending five synchronized skywriting planes on a two hour journey across the Bay Area – over a pantheon of mathematically inclined institutions: NASA Ames, Livermore Labs, UC Berkeley, Stanford University, Google, Facebook, Twitter and Apple – Pi in the Sky will fill the blue expanse with streams of numbers, 3.14159265… The planes, which will be released sometime during the opening weekend of the Biennial when the weather is optimal, will be equipped with dot-matrix skywriting technology that produces numbers nearly a quarter-mile tall. 

Look to the Skies for Signs and Wonders

ZERO1 Biennial
Seeking Silicon Valley
September 12 – December 8, 2012

August 2012, San Jose, CA – ZERO1: The Art & Technology Network is pleased to announce schedule highlights for the 2012 ZERO1 Biennial, one of the world’s only Biennials to focus on the convergence of contemporary art and technology, taking place in Silicon Valley, around the Bay Area, and beyond this September 12 to December 8.

Inviting more than 150 artists from over 13 countries, the 2012 ZERO1 Biennial will present works at the forefront of media art – collaborating with local, regional, national and international cultural institutions and iconic Silicon Valley companies to showcase three months of exhibitions, events, and performances – in museums and galleries, in skywriting above San Francisco, in the streets and storefronts of Silicon Valley, on iPads and smartphones, and across the World Wide Web.

The 2012 ZERO1 Biennial theme and the core Biennial exhibition, Seeking Silicon Valley, was inspired by Silicon Valley’s globally renowned reputation as the hub of high-tech entrepreneurial innovation and networked creativity, as much as from the region’s conspicuous lack of publicly accessible features including borders, a defining architecture, a singular culture, and a cohesive sense of place. Biennial artists and the Biennial’s partnering organizations have been charged with articulating the2012 theme Seeking Silicon Valley in all of the showcased performances, exhibitions, events and panels.

For three months throughout the Bay Area the Biennial will feature installations, interactive media, sculptures, online works, videos and performances by artists who are utilizing technology to create contemporary art in original and provocative ways. The lineup of Biennial artists for 2012 include such notable art world figures as Lynn Hershman Leeson, whose new cinematic installationPresent Tense – examining the human effects of global water toxicity and including high definition videos of babies swimming under water – will debut as part of the Biennial’s main exhibition,Seeking Silicon Valley. Partnering with eBay Inc., Jer Thorp, the New York Times’ lauded Data Artist in Residence, and Columbia professor Mark Hansen have been commissioned to create a data-driven work. The public can view the piece  – which ties excerpts from classic literature to eBay listings and transactions – as it is projected on the Internet giant’s North Campus entrance starting September 12, 2012 when the Biennial launches.

Like all of the artworks in this uniquely collaborative Biennial – a dynamic network of shows and events involving an established and esteemed group of cultural partners, including the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Stanford University Institute for Creativity and the Arts,New York’s Eyebeam Art & Technology Center, Russia’s Ural Industrial Biennial, and the South Korean biennial Media City Seoul – the eBay Inc. installation was inspired by the 2012 Biennial theme Seeking Silicon Valley.

“Silicon Valley is an idea as much as a place,” says Biennial Lead Curator and ZERO1’s Director of Programs Jaime Austin. “Renowned globally as a hub of entrepreneurship and innovation, Silicon Valley is notoriously difficult to experience. More than a specific location it is a network of freeways, technologies, companies, and relationships connected in a complex physical and virtual web. Modeling this networked nature, the 2012 ZERO1 Biennial is a network of curators from different countries bringing a global perspective to the Biennial exhibition, a network of contemporary artists sharing and presenting work, as well as a network of Biennial partners presenting exhibitions, events and performances connecting Silicon Valley and beyond.”

(more…)

Oh No! Caffe Roma Co-Opts a Parklet on Columbus Avenue: Formerly Public Space is Now For Paying Customers Only

Tuesday, August 23rd, 2011

[UPDATE - "SanFrustration" explicates, regarding some information in the Comments section about there being, in fact, a sign on the parklet concerned saying how it is for the public: "I wish I would have seen that sign when the old white haired guy came out and rudely told me I had to leave. When I questioned him on it, he was adamant that it was their chairs and tables, and made a big deal of waiting for me to pack up my food. Bear in mind, there was only one other person at the 6 or 7 tables there. All the others were empty. This guy came with attitude from the get go that was both uncalled for and misplaced, and had another older guy standing next to him that was supposed to serve as his backup or something? For what its worth, I overheard them talking about cramming more tables and chairs into the space in preparation for an upcoming parade.

O.K. then. Be sure to check SanFrustration's story in the Comments section. He blames an "older Italian man" for the trouble. Somebody in management, not a waiter. Who could that be?]

[UPDATE II - Now, it's not my job to file a complaint with "Tony Roma," the "owner" of the parklet in question, or anybody else. (Mmmm... it's fun to make up names for ourselves, in'nt? Instead of "Tony Roma" (heh), what about Vitale Venezia, Santino Serrano, or Matteo Milano? You know, something catchy.]

What gives Caffe Roma the right to kick The Public out of the public parklet* at 526 Columbus Avenue?

Absolutely nothing.

I’ll say it again: Absolutely nothing.

And yet, employees of this joint are kicking Il Pubblico out.

Can you imagine?

Let’s read about what happens when a non-customer (let’s use il nome “SanFrustration”) has the temerity to use a public parklet as a public parklet:

“I am writing to express concerns with the way Cafe Roma is handling the public parklet in front of their establishment on Columbus Avenue. As I sat down to enjoy a lunch purchased elsewhere, I was told by Cafe Roma management that I needed to purchase something from them or I’d have to leave. When I explained that I was under the impression this was public space, they said it wasn’t and indicated I was using their table and chair, and thus couldn’t sit there.

When I looked for the public bench in the parklet, I observed that their tables were crowded into this space, making it impossible for anybody to actually use the benches. It was my impression that these parklets were not intended for private enterprise, and I’m very alarmed that they are claiming this area as part of their establishment and not allowing any public usage.”

Testify!

Does it have to say “PUBLIC PARKLET – ALL SEATING IS OPEN TO THE PUBLIC” in order for these areas to be public? Non so.

This photo shows a different parklet, but I think the rules are the same all over the City. See the words in there, camera left? 

Via Streetsblog – photo: Myleen Hollero/Orange Photography - click to expand

I cry foul. Accuso! Accuso!

Hey Caffe Roma, should you accommodate the public at the public park in front of your business?

Perche no?

I know you’ve paid fees and whatnot, but you didn’t buy the land in fee simple absolute, right?

*Or walklet, as some call them

Finally, Tower Crane Replaces Coronet Theatre. Soon, Senior Housing on Geary

Thursday, April 30th, 2009

Famed five-star Yelp-rated Coronet Theatre at 3575 Geary near Palm Avenue in the Inner Richmond district done closed down with a final showing of Million Dollar Baby on March 17, 2005. Did people camp out for ages to be first in line for a Star Wars movie premier back in the day? Oh yes. But that’s all history now.

These days, straight-out-of-Hayward Peck and Hiller is laying concrete For The Future, which will take form of a building from the Institute on Aging for housing seniors. We shall take a look-see, non?

The mise-en-scene. Click to expand:

Let’s take a peek up there at The Toughest Job You’ll Ever Love. This tower crane operator sits and stands to make everything work.

Rebar sailing above Geary Boulevard. Mind the spilled motor oil

Burly construction workers are on hand to protect the Porta-Potties from the One Who Shant Be Named:

And here’s what it will all look like, if you can see past the chain link and graffiti:

It’s too bad we lost the Coronet, but just try filling a 1300-seat one-screen theater in this Day and Age.

Get ready for the Inner Richmond, seniors!

And he cried mightily with a strong voice, saying, Coronet, Coronet the Great is fallen, is fallen, and is become the habitation of devils, and the hold of every foul spirit, and a cage of every unclean and hateful bird. For all bay areans have drunk of the wine of the wrath of her projection, and the kings of Hollywood have committed fornication with her, and the merchants of the Earth are waxed rich through the abundance of her delicacies.