Posts Tagged ‘recycle’

Sorry “Christopher B. Dolan Law Firm,” But All Your New Phone Books Just Went Into the Recycling

Monday, December 8th, 2014

You know, I was just thinking how long it’s been since I’ve seen any waterlogged phone books stacked up on the Streets of San Francisco.

But now, they’re back, all over the place. See?

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But then, nobody picks them up and then they’re garbage. Or recycling.

Hey, how many days does it take for an unwanted stack of phone books to become garbage? One? Two?

And hey, what about the plastic around the phone books – is that the recyclable kind? IDK.

And if a hundred get stacked up outside a large apartment building, then the super’s gotta go through and unwrap each one? Sounds like a chore.

Speaking of which, here’s a dozen or so 2015 415 books in a Recology blue bin:

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Poor naive Dolan Law Firm – all that marketing money, wasted!

I’ve said this before – nobody in the 415 wants your product, phone book industry. What you all should do is deliver your books, unwrapped, direct to Recology and save us all a lot of trouble.

PS: “Opt out” is a lie. That’s just what they want you to do, opt out. Oh, please take all my information, you know, to prove I am who I say I am, so that the phone book industry can rest assured that “bad actors” aren’t impersonating me in order to deprive me of my phone book, for some odd reason, and I’m supposed to “opt out” each and every year, the better to keep track of me? OK fine. And oh, you dinosaurs have a “sustainability report?” Well why don’t you people print it out on paper and send it to me every year, whether I want it or not? GREAT!

Haven’t Seen a San Francisco Phone Book in a Good Long Time – Perhaps the Industry is Giving Up on the 415?

Friday, November 28th, 2014

Seems like we saw a lot more phone books around town a half-decade ago – they were all over the place, whether you wanted them or not.

These days, they’re a lot smaller:

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Anyway, it looks like the phone book industry has pretty much given up on delivering their useless products to us.

Good.

How We Do It in the 415: Massive Tree Branch Goes Right Into a Garbage Truck – And Then to a Landfill?

Friday, October 25th, 2013

Take a look – what do you think?

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In aggravation, SFGov, the official government of the city and county of San Francisco wastes world-class drinking water on everything. San Francisco has never ever recycled water in all its history. We could, but we don’t feel like it…

Anyway, I don’t know who these people are and I didn’t take this shot, so there you go.

Attention San Francisco: The Great Phonebook Recycle of 2012 Has Begun – If You See a Big Stack, Recycle Immediately

Friday, November 30th, 2012

Here’s a good dozen what sat in the lobby for twelve long hours.

Guess what? Nobody took even a one.

So these books got hauled off to the big blue bin when I got home last night. Good times.

And best of all,  those The Real Yellow Pages / AT&T / YP books are surprisingly small these days, so you can carry them all in just one trip, you know, before they get all soggy:

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Uh, AT&T, what’s the point of this exercise?

Nobody in San Francisco wants your Yellow Pages.

I know you think that we do, but we don’t.

Does Verizon do this? No

Does Sprint do this? No

Does T-Mobile do this? No

So why do you do it?

I know that you can do it, you know, legally, but I don’t know why you do it.

If you want to get credit for giving minimum wage union members money, why not just give them money and be done with it?

Anyway, if I see any stack of your phonebooks anywhere about town anywhere near a big blue recycling bin or an AT&T store, they’re all going to get together tout de suite.

No charge.

See you in Hell, Yellow Pages people.

NB: Don’t try to “opt out,” San Francisco. All that does is give your contact information to AT&T so that they can ask you, every fucking year, if you still want to opt out. My conclusion: AT&T is a cancer.

CW Nevius vs. HANC – See How the Chronicle Writer Wrote His Story – Video of Chuck in Action

Friday, July 6th, 2012

CW Nevius is pretty argumentative for a newspaper writer here in this recent video made of his visit to HANC.

Check it:

SEPARATING FACT FROM FICTION

CW Nevius came out with a new article antagonizing  the efforts of the Kezar Gardens Ecology Center on Thursday.  Perhaps, if one were to read only the first and last lines of the piece, it could be considered accurate, but everything in between is highly questionable in terms of its precision.  We were lucky to get a tape recording of the interview between Nevius and Ed Dunn, recycling center director.

Tuesday morning, Chronicle photographer, Lea Suzuki, spent hours in the yard photographing recyclers and gardeners for the piece Nevius was writing this week.  She encouraged Nevius to come by as well to see the changes and talk to the energetic chief of staff, Ed Dunn.  And, to his credit, Nevius came by Tuesday afternoon and talked recycling center politics with Ed.  He let us tape him and did not hold back on his vehement opposition to the center, however, he seemed to be quite misinformed and uninterested in setting the record straight.”

“So, we waited to see what he would come up with.  What we got was an emotional article filled with inaccuracies and completely ignoring or failing to research many of the issues presented to him that day.  In response, we have put together a short video detailing the difference between his report and what actually transpired.  The major points we dispute in the video are:

1. The Native Plant garden was a “last ditch effort” to prevent an eviction

Greg Gaar began gardens at the site about a dozen years ago.  He has planted an acre of grounds in native plants surrounding the center and continues to develop and contribute to effective restoration projects all over the city including the Green Hairstreek Butterfly project on Golden Gate Heights.

2. The salaries are too high and no one wanted to show him the books.

Simple math demonstrated in the video refutes that along with an offer to look at the accounting that Nevius does not choose partake in.  The average salary with benefits for a staff member at HANC is approximately 36K and includes health care.

3.  Reference to the Golden Gate Master Plan as proof of non-conforming use.

Nevius was informed about the County General Plan that does allow for a public service that is hard to locate and cannot be located elsewhere to exist on parkland- he made no reference to this in his article.  Also, at this point, no other site on the west side of SF has been identified for HANC to relocate to.

4. Nobody wants us.  City Hall hates HANC.

In Feb 2011, the Board of Supervisors passed a resolution in favor of HANC recycling center, they demanded  that the City work in GOOD FAITH with the center on this issue.  There are also over 100 community gardeners as well as local recyclers that patronize the space everyday. Check out our other blogs detailing the visits of D5 Supe Christina Olague and Homeless Advocate Bevan Dufty, each having an extremely positive reaction to the site.

Take a few moments to see for yourself.  And take a gander at the Nevius article through the link below as well as HANC’s 990, it’s all public.  It’s certainly not news that we have opponents in this struggle but we must be vigilant about reporting the facts to the best of our knowledge and holding this reporter to the same virtue.

Nevius Article

http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/nevius/article/HANC-finally-at-the-end-of-the-line-isn-t-it-3684759.php#photo-3156836

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So the Only Difference Between a Good Christmas Tree Abandoner and a Bad Christmas Tree Abandoner is Timing?

Friday, January 6th, 2012

I think that’s it.

A grove of dead Christmas trees, Financial District, California, USA. Just throw it wherever the Hell you want, Christian. We’ll take care of it for you:

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Boy, getting rid of these trees is a lot easier than getting them in the first place…

So, bring out your dead.

How Sad: Bronze Statue of Skippy, a Jack Russell Terrier from Sausalito, Gets Melted Down

Wednesday, August 3rd, 2011

You just can’t leave metal about overnight these days.

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Is This a Useless Telephone Book Delivery, a Useless Telephone Book Protest, or Useless Telephone Book Performance Art?

Monday, April 11th, 2011

Do you think these guys going past the Academy of Art University on Mission were simply:

1. Delivering useless phone books; or

2. Marching to return the useless phone books from whence they came as so many have done before them; or

3. Performing some of that performance art to make you wonder about What It All Means?

Well, my vote is for option 3:

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What those phone book companies ought to do is to deliver them direct to your recycling bin and then you could fish them out if you actually wanted them.

That would save a lot of trouble…

Dear AT&T: Nobody in San Francisco Wants Your Fracking Useless Telephone Books, Absolutely Nobody

Friday, December 17th, 2010

Is there some law that says AT&T is required to deliver waaaaaaay too many phone books to San Francisco households every year? Could be.

If there is, wouldn’t it be easier for all concerned if instead of leaving all these unwanted phone books out in the rain for day after day, week after week, AT&T could just have its workers deliver them directly to the recycling bins out back?

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What’s that, AT&T? People still love your phone books? No they don’t.

Obviously, there’s profit to be had, somehow, in this annual exercise, so oh well.

Is Mayor Newsom Trying to Shut Down the Haight Ashbury Neighborhood Council Recycling Center?

Tuesday, August 31st, 2010

The people at our Yelp-rated Haight Ashbury Neighborhood Council (HANC) Recycling Center and Native Plant Nursery at 780 Frederick Street betwixt Arguello and Lincoln think that Mayor Gavin Newsom wants to, before he leaves local politics, shut the place down.

Why? Well, they believe that due to all the skivvy from:

“Anonymous sources in the Mayor’s Office, the Department of the Environment, and Recreation and Parks…”

O.K. then.

Via edibleoffice

Anyway, here are the deets:

“San Francisco’s Green Mayor Threatens Local Recycling Center With Eviction? Ten Green Jobs On The Line. 5,000 Native Plants Endangered. Thousands of SF Residents Will Miss City’s #1 Recycling Center
 
Anonymous sources in the Mayor’s Office, the Department of the Environment, and Recreation and Parks all confirm that the Mayor wants the Haight Ashbury Neighborhood Council (HANC) Recycling and Native Plant Nursery out by the end of his term. The Mayor mistakenly believes this draconian act will reduce illegal street activity in the Neighborhood and in Golden Gate Park.
 
HANC Operations Manager Charlie Lamar disputes the connection. “Fewer than one in five of our customers sleep outside and more than half come in cars” says Lamar who has worked there over twenty years. He added “If you watch the short video petition you’ll see how our customer base is really quite diverse and representative of the City as a whole”.
 
This misguided decision to evict HANC, which founded the Recycling Center in 1974, will leave the ten San Franciscans who work there without a job. HANC pays a living wage and provides health care. Given the high unemployment rate, many of these workers will be out of a work for a long time and may well end up homeless.
 
Thousands of San Franciscans who recycle at HANC will be forced to use one of the other rapidly diminishing recycling centers across town. San Francisco is notoriously underserved by recycling centers.
 
“San Francisco has only one recycling center for every 44,000 residents whereas across the State you’ll find one for every 18,000”, says Ed Dunn,HANC’s Executive Director whose father founded the Recycling Center thirty-six years ago.
 
The fate of the Native Plant Nursery and its 5,000 plants remains unclear. Whether or not it would be incorporated into a new proposed “Garden Resource Center” at the HANC site is an open question. The need for such a new project located so close to the existing Garden for the Environment (HANC is their fiscal agent) which has similar programs does not seem to be great.
 
HANC already plans to offer free soil to community gardeners in the near future. And its Native Plant Nursery and Garden has been a destination for those interested in habitat restoration and gardening with native plants for years.