Posts Tagged ‘redevelopment’

R.I.P. Reggie Pettus, 73 – The Fillmore’s New Chicago Barber Shop Now Shuttered – Memorial on May 11th, 2013

Monday, May 6th, 2013

R.I.P.

Reggie Pettus
ProprietorNew Chicago Barber Shop, 1551 Fillmore

The memorial will be on Saturday May 11th from Noon to 6:00 PM at Duggan’s Funeral Home, 3434 17th St. near Valencia in the Mission District, San Francisco, California 94110 (415) 431-4900.

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Via Seth N:

“To my great dismay, I stopped by to get my hair cut today, only to find the place boarded up. It seems the barbers have moved on to other places.

Kevin has moved to 1315 Fillmore, just down the street, while Al and Gail have moved to Esquire Barber Shop at 1826 Geary Blvd.

I’ve been getting my hair cut her e since 2006, and it’s a shame to see such a place just disappear. The barbers were nice, remembered me even after I left the city for a couple years, and always fixed me up right. Plus, the moment you walked in you could feel the history of the place, there was a nice feel there.

I wish the staff all the best, and I’ll be seeking out Kevin soon at his new location.”

Presenting Your Brand-New, Mid-Market SFPD Substation! At 72 6th Street in the Gritty Twitterloin – Nice Marble Facade

Tuesday, August 28th, 2012

I’ll tell you, that Bluoz is Everywhere You Want To Be, Twitterloinwise.

As here, where he’s the first to publicize the brand new police station on 6th Street betwixt Market and Mission: 

Via Bluoz – click to expand

You see, it’s “Coming in 2012,” which, of course, is actually already here right now so I guess that’s one way of saying OPENING SOON.

Will this place be more like a koban or more like an actual real police station?

We’ll see, soon enough.

Bon courage, SFPD! You have your work cut out for you.

Returning to the Scene of a Western Addition Mugging 24-Hours Later – “Losing” a Wallet in the Projects at McAllister and Octavia

Thursday, March 22nd, 2012

News of the day:

McAllister and Octavia streets
8:40 p.m. Monday

A man, 28, was robbed by three thugs, police said. One of the crooks simulated a gun in his waistband and demanded the victim’s goods. The three fled.”

Here’s the scene exactly 24 hours later as I just happened to be cruising by. Looks safe enough to me:

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I don’t know, are the housing projects of the Western Addition a good reason to stay out of the Western Addition?

SFGov’s real estate experiment continues…

Yet Another Japantown “Better” Neighborhood Plan (BNP) Meeting This Afternoon on Sutter Street – Catered by Bushi-Tei Bistro

Sunday, July 31st, 2011

I’ll give you this, the Powers That Be are doing a better job with the Japantown BNP this go-around owing, to me not seeing stuff about “no more highrises.”

And, for the first time, I see stuff about “other cultural” what-have-you.

(If that’s too cryptic that’s  all right. Basically, this whole process is a focus group for the City to get reactions about what it already wants to do. If you want to participate, well then be my guest.)

All the deets:

I mean, is it necessarily a good thing to “expand the Special Use District?”

I don’t know. (Last year, a couple Angry Young Men were pretty p.o.’ed about one meeting being “dominated” by aging white hakujin who live south of Geary. These AYM wondered why those residing on the wrong side of the Expressway were even included in a Japantown meeting…)

Anyway, ever more deets:

“Date: Sunday, July 31, 2011
Start Time: 12:30 pm   End Time: 3:00 pm

Phone: (415) 346-1239

More Infohttp://sfplanning.org/index.aspx?page=1692

Location Details

Date: Sunday, July 31, 2011
Start Time: 12:30 pm End Time: 3:00 pm
(Time Zone: US/Pacific)

Location: Issei Memorial Hall at JCCCNC (map)

Category: Japantown Better Neighborhood Plan

A Community Vision: Sustainability and Renewal

Preserve, restore and enhance Japantown as a vital, prosperous, and livable community that authentically reflects, embodies and continues its cultural heritage and history into the future.

The Japantown Organizing Committee invites you to attend a series of community meetings. We need your input and guidance on their recommended changes to the 2009 draft neighborhood plan.

We will meet to discuss:

Important neighborhood planning

Development issues

Questions about Zoning

Before the end of 2011, the final Japantown community recommendations are scheduled for consideration by the San Francisco Planning Commission. Your help at these meetings is vital to shape the neighborhood recommendations to the Planning Commission.

Click here to download handouts for this meeting.

Phone: (415) 346-1239

More Info: http://sfplanning.org/index.aspx?page=1692

Location Details

Issei Memorial Hall at JCCCNC
1840 Sutter Street
San Francisco CA 94115 US

“Linear Park?” Word from Japantown: The Webster Street Linear Park (WSLP) is NOT RECOMMENDED

Tuesday, June 28th, 2011

What’s this? The first time I hear about a “linear park” and, already, the idea’s been killed.

That’s what I learned last night at the poorly-attended “Better” Neighborhood Project meeting. (For some reason the one they had earlier this month had a lot more people, oh well.)

Now last I heard, a few years ago, the powers that be were going to earthquake safe the Japantown parking garage on Post and then during construction people would be able to park their cars on the northbound lanes of excessively-wide Webster Street. But I suppose that got replaced with this linear park idea.

Anyway, here it is:

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Oh, and here too. See the driveways and whatnot?

Anyway, that’s your Japantown BNP update.

It’s Time for Yet Another Japantown Better Neighborhood Plan: Tonight at 6:30 PM, Public Realm/Transportation

Monday, June 27th, 2011

Today, June 27th, 2011, from exactly 6:30pm – 9:10pm, will see yet another BNP meeting for Japantown.

As with many of these kinds of meetings in the 415, the big decisions have already been made and your input is as a kind of focus group participant, you know, do you like the lighter beige or the darker beige swatch kind-of-thing.

For one thing, Chinese-Americans and Korean-Americans, who are already there in J-Town…

San Francisco’s Japantown at night:

Click to expand

…have been left out of the process, by design.

Oh well.

Anyway:

Location: JCCCNC – Issei Memorial Hall
Time: June 27, 6:30pm – 9:10pm
Topic: PUBLIC REALM/TRANSPORTATION & CIRCULATION

  1. Japantown Landscape Vision: Install professional, well orchestrated Japan-influenced landscape vision to increase canopy, greenery and Japanese botanical species.
  2. Public Open Spaces: Use the Japantown landscape vision to enhance our central core of existing gathering spaces and create transition areas to other public open spaces.
  3. Transportation/Circulation: Leverage all city projects to fund improvements to traffic, pedestrian safety, signage and connections to adjucent neighborhoods and parks.

Community Meeting
Issei Memorial Hall @ JCCCNC
1840 Sutter Street, SF (between Buchannan & Webster Streets)
Date: June 27, 2011, 6:30-9:10 pm

Topics: Public Realm/Transportation and Circulation

Japantown Landscape Vision: Install professional, well orchestrated Japaninfluenced landscape vision to increase canopy, greenery and Japanese botanical species.

Public Open Spaces: Use Japantown landscape vision to enhance our central core
of existing gathering spaces and create transition areas to other public open spaces.
Transportation and Circulation

Leverage all city projects to fund improvements to traffic, pedestrian safety, signage
and connections to adjacent neighborhoods and parks

More deets after the jump.

(more…)

Deciding What’s “Appropriate” for Japantown: Here’s What the First Better Neighborhood Project Meeting Looked Like

Thursday, June 2nd, 2011

Community organizer Julian Davis was on hand at last night’s Better Neighborhood Project meeting put on by San Francisco’s Planning Department, you know, the one where it’s been preordained that There Shall Not Be Any More Highrises in Japantown. Anyway, he’s more optimistic than I am about the whole process.

Basically, San Francisco Government, the people who brought us Redevelopment, the people who tore down perfectly good houses (or “drafty old Victorians,” in their words, back in the day), the people who still haven’t apologized for that, the people who messed up Japantown big time with the whole concrete and clay and general decay motif, well, they’re back and they have a Plan.

Now, if you want to affect the plan, you need to be part of the leadership element of an area “community group.” It doesn’t matter all that much how many people are in your group, but you’re going to need a title and a group name to matter. If that’s not the case, then the best you can hope for is a chance to voice an out-of-the-box idea that’s slightly novel or crazy enough to work.

But I’ll tell you, the big decisions have already been made.

Here are the final ten minutes of last night’s meeting on Sutter, with three kind-0f focus group leaders offering feedback on what the audience members were saying. (Don’t mind the alarmingly loud iPhone buzzing at the end…)

Anything that the Planning Department has decided that’s not appropriate for this particular part of the Western Addition (like young people from South Korea, or China, or Taiwan opening up businesses on or near Post Street or a taller building (you know, one that could actually pay for itself and Other Things Too) that could block the view of that horrible Peace Pagoda*) is considered contagion. Oh well.

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On It Goes…

*I looked it up once and that Peace Plaza pagoda thing actually is Ur-Japanese, it actually is just like some stuff that was all over part of the southern part of Japan’s biggest island, but it seems more Pan-Asian or Chinese to most Japanese people that see it. They don’t recognize it as anything Japanese at all. This concrete thing is the Vaillancourt Fountain of the West Side.

It’s Been Decided: “No Highrises” Anymore for Japantown – First BNP Community Meeting Tonight

Wednesday, June 1st, 2011

I don’t know, who decides that there should be no more high-rise buildings in Japantown? Like I said, I don’t know. Last I heard, high rises were on the menu…

Anyway, feel free to rubber-stamp what, apparently, has already been decided for you starting tonight.

Here’s the sked:

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The 1st Community Meeting
Wednesday, June 1
6:30 to 9:00
JCCCNC- Issei Memorial Hall
1840 Sutter Street 

* Food and Refreshments

* Japanese Interpreters will be at each meeting 

Special Guests:
Supervisor Ross Mirkarimi
Planning Director John Rahaim


Agenda:

6:30 to 7:00      Registration and Food

7:00  to 9:00     Program
► Facilitated Breakout Sessions for Public Input
1. Community Land Use:Maintain current building heights and scale with a focus on business and residential mix — No highrises.

2. Cultural Character: Establish architectural standards to maintain the Japanese/Japanese American character of the community core.
3. Japan Center: Retain the malls’ basic scale and rehabilitate structure; support business that perpetuate Japantown’s cultural authenticity.
►Exit Interviews

 

A Day in the Life of McAllister: #1, Gingerbread Houses Remind Us of Why We Should Kill All Redevelopment Agencies Now

Tuesday, March 15th, 2011

Kill them dead dead dead.

While we have the chance.

Kill kill kill.

Somehow, these houses survived the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency. It was some kind of Miracle:

Do you know the slogan of the SFRA? It’s this:

“Sure, we used to suck, but not anymore!”

Anyway, in honor of Daylight Savings kicking in, enjoy some posts on an evening trip up McAllister last night. These are the kind of  things you missed before they Turned Off the Dark.

In closing, Daylight Savings Rulez!

We should have it all the time!!!

Jerry Brown Kicks Ass: Wants to Kill Redevelopment Agencies, But San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee Says No

Sunday, February 20th, 2011

Governor Jerry Brown has arrived in 2011 taking names and kicking ass, más o menos. His latest target is on California’s wasteful Redevelopment Agencies – he wants to kill them dead, fair ‘nough.

But here comes the blowback, from, among others, San Francisco Mayor Edwin Lee. Deets below.

Automatic for the People: No private jet for Jer-Bear, oh no. He flies the Southwest Airlines:

Jan Sturmann

(And are you aware of the phrase “Big 10 California cities?” Are they like an entity or something? Is it like, “Step away, Bakersfield and Riverside! You gots to add 20k more people before you can join Anaheim and all the rest of us in the Big Ten?”)

You sort of got to figure that if JB wanted to propose something like Ed Lee’s idea, JB already would have done just that, right? Or maybe JB is just too stupid to figure things out?

And isn’t the City and County of San Francisco free to fund whatever corporate welfare it wants on its own?

And does any politician anywhere really “create jobs?” IRL?

Anyway, all the deets:

“MAYOR EDWIN LEE TO TRAVEL TO SACRAMENTO TO SUPPORT ALTERNATIVE PROPOSAL TO GOVERNOR’S PLAN TO ELIMINATE LOCAL REDEVELOPMENT AGENCIES

San Francisco, CA – Mayor Edwin M. Lee today announced he will travel to Sacramento later this week to support an alternative to the proposed elimination of Redevelopment Agencies in response to Governor Jerry Brown’s request for revenue and reform ideas that would generate $1.7 billion in savings. Over the past several weeks, mayors have developed a viable alternative to eliminating Redevelopment Agencies that creates an ongoing revenue stream and will reform and right-size redevelopment agencies, while preserving this important tool for creating jobs and housing for California’s future.

“Redevelopment has been used as a critical tool by cities like San Francisco to transform neighborhoods, create jobs, and spur economic growth,” said Mayor Lee. “The alternative proposal addresses Governor Brown’s call for revenue and reform ideas as the State faces difficult budget challenges and would allow cities to continue to wisely use redevelopment dollars to leverage private dollars to revitalize communities, create local jobs, and stimulate the local economy.”

The alternative proposal Mayor Lee supports would provide:

· State Budget Funding: Starting in July, redevelopment agencies will transfer 5% of their property tax funding to the State on an annual basis. This will generate over $200 million each year to support over $1.7 billion in special bonds, meeting the Governor’s plan to generate $1.7 billion in 2011-12 funding from agencies.

· Enhanced Local Revenue Sharing: Redevelopment agencies will dramatically increase the share of property taxes which “pass-through” counties, schools, and other taxing entities. Starting in 2018, 40% of agency property tax increment will return to counties and schools, 20% will be used for affordable housing development, and 40% will be used for economic development activities, including investment in infrastructure and public improvements which support critical job-generating development.

· Structural Reforms: Cities will be limited in the amount of property that can be placed into redevelopment areas, and enhanced public information and hearing requirements will be put in place to ensure that all major investments are fully reviewed by the public. Restrictions will be tightened on the use of affordable housing funds, to ensure that these monies are used to meet pressing community needs.

This proposal comes on the heels of an independent analysis completed at the request of the Big 10 California cities that shows there is 50% of the $1.7 billion estimated by the State Department of Finance as available in the current fiscal year from the state’s redevelopment agencies.

In San Francisco, the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency (SFRA) has been instrumental in helping to revitalize communities, create jobs and generate tax revenues. SFRA has been integral to the growth and economic development of San Francisco over the past 62 years. Successful completed redevelopment projects include the Embarcadero Center and Golden Gateway complex, Hunters Point Hill, Yerba Buena Center, the Giants AT&T Ballpark, and the development of over 10,000 units of affordable housing. Current efforts include large-scale master-planned developments in Mission Bay, Treasure Island and Hunters Point Shipyard, neighborhood revitalization in the Bayview and South of Market, funding for the reconstruction of the Transbay Terminal, and the rebuilding of some of the City’s most dilapidated public housing projects.

San Francisco focused public investment in the City’s emerging neighborhoods is leveraging private investment to create new industries, jobs, and housing. In Mission Bay, the redevelopment of this former railyard has already created over 3,100 new homes (674 affordable) and 1.7 million square feet of office and biotechnology space centered around the UCSF research campus. SFRA’s investment of $110 million in public redevelopment financing for infrastructure to date has leveraged over $2.0 billion in private development and created over 10,000 permanent new jobs. Without continued redevelopment financing of infrastructure, the remaining 2,900 units of housing, (including more than 1,100 additional affordable units to be financed with tax increment), 2.7 million square feet of commercial development, and completed infrastructure for the UCSF Medical Center will be jeopardized, along with 20,000 additional permanent jobs.”