Posts Tagged ‘rental’

Forget About “Car Share” – What You Need to Do is Rent a Ferrari from Club Sportiva – An “Experience Beyond Ownership”

Tuesday, December 2nd, 2014

Here’s a Club Sportiva delivery back in the day, on Market Street:

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An “experience beyond ownership,” whatever that meant.

Now here’s another on 19th Avenue, just recently:

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So what, your wife spends $1000-something bucks to have two bros deliver a Lambo to your office on a Friday afternoon and then you’ll be a big macher for the weekend?

I’ll tell you, this business makes no sense in Frisco.

The Lazy Stokers of Golden Gate Park

Friday, November 14th, 2014

So lazy!

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The Most Airbnb People You Could Possibly Imagine, Alamo Square Area, Western Addition, USA

Monday, August 11th, 2014

(Not That There’s Anything Wrong With That.)

This has been a remarkable change, over the past half-decade.

You see them, all over the place, every day, coming and going, taking photos of buildings, looking at maps, asking where “the Seven Ladies” are, asking where the “Full House house” is, and rolling luggage up and down the street, you know, that kind of thing.

Sometimes I don’t know if they’re Airbnb people, but other times, like this time, it’s easy to tell: 

Click to expand

I don’t have a generalized beef against tourists – that makes me different from the typical Western Addition NIMBY.

In any event, this is what Airbnb looks like IRL on the street.

Nest of “Scoot” Rental Scooters Parked in a Public Space in the Western Addition – Is This Kosher? – Is This SFMTA-Approved?

Thursday, August 7th, 2014

I know not, Gentle Reader.

I guess they leave these scooters about and you find them with your cell phone and then drive away?

OK fine. I’ve just never seen a nest like this before.

Maybe next time I come through, there’ll be 30 parked in a row and there’ll be Hertz and Avis rental cars in there as well and the Western A will become a rental car haven.

One supposes SFGov is cool with this…

 

Will This Fall’s Half-Billion Transit Bond Allow Your Landlord to Raise Your Rent, Costing You Thousands? – “Pass-Throughs”

Friday, August 1st, 2014

I don’t know.

But check this out:

“Ordinance calling and providing for a special election to be held in the City and County of San Francisco on Tuesday, November 4, 2014, for the purpose of submitting to San Francisco voters a proposition to incur the following bonded debt of the City and County: $500,000,000 to finance the construction, acquisition, and improvement of certain transportation and transit related improvements, and related costs necessary or convenient for the foregoing purposes; authorizing landlords to pass-through 50% of  the resulting property tax increase to residential tenants under Administrative Code Chapter 37…”

All right kids – you do the math. Start with $850,000,000 and divide that up among the denizens of the 415 / 628.

I don’t know how to do that but when I tried, I came up with a $30 a month rent increase for you, Gentle Reader, for the next 7-10 years.

Would the average landlord take the trouble to do a pass-through? IDK. I’m thinking the typical rent-controlled renter in SF doesn’t have to deal with pass-throughs currently. But maybe this big old honking bond would be the trigger for a wave of passthroughs?

Here’s what former SFGov employee Howard Wong has to say:

Arguments against MUNI infrastructure improvement bond

What does the ballot measure do:

Raises property taxes and rents (50% pass-through) to pay for General Obligation Bonds of $500 million, with $350 million in interest payments, for a total debt load of $850 million.

Funds “may be allocated” for transit and roads—carte blanche authority for unspecific projects.

If the Bond is rejected by voters, property taxes and rents would be reduced for everyone—not just for rich companies and the wealthy.

To read the Ordinance’s legal language is to oppose the Bond Measure.

http://www.sfgov2.org/ftp/uploadedfiles/elections/ElectionsArchives/Meeting_Information/BSC/agendas/2014/November/1-B%20Transportation%20Road%20Improvement%20GO.pdf

The SFMTA wants more money, certainly. But the question is what will the SFMTA do for us in order to get the money, right? Otherwise, we’re just shoveling more coal into a broken-down machine. Why not use the bond as a carrot to get the SFMTA to reform?

Perhaps our SFMTA doesn’t deserve this bond?

Anyway, if I were promoting this bond, I’d figure out what the odds are that landlords would pass through 50% of the burden and also how much rents would be increased, on average, and for how long. And then I’d say, well this is what the SFMTA is going to do with your money and this is how much it will cost you, the renter, or you, the owner.

Is this massive transit bond a good idea?

I don’t know.

What’s Coming to San Francisco Next Week? “Crowdfunded Supercars” from Blancfleet.Com

Tuesday, July 22nd, 2014

Sadly, most supercars you see in San Francisco aren’t properly registered in California. The reason mostly has to do with CA use tax, which comes due the second you start “using” your new ride by driving it around.

So some people end up paying $10, or $20, or $30 per mile during the short time  they own and drive a Ferrari, for example.

So other people simply dispense with paying CA use tax, because it’s so pricey.

Here’s an alternative – Blancfleet. They say they’re opening up next week in the Bay Area.

“Blancfleet is the world’s first supercar sharing platform where car enthusiasts crowdfund and timeshare the supercars they love. Timesharing allows car enthusiasts on Blancfleet to spread the cost of owning, operating, and insuring a supercar with other car enthusiasts. On Blancfleet, there are no annual membership fees, no refueling requirements, no car insurance requirements, no car maintenance fees, no car storage fees, and no security deposit requirements. Timesharing also allows members to enjoy supercars with unlimited miles”

More deets here and here.

Is this a good idea for you? IDK. But it will be refreshing to see valid CA license plates on these cars. And if you’re tempted to buy a car like one of these, consider that lots of times people just end up selling a few months later ala the Porsche GT2 that Paul Walker died in - that car traded hands many, many times before it was destroyed.

Maybe you don’t want to buy a car, maybe you just want to rent.

Maybe.

New “Upshift” Company Delivers a Rental Car to You – It’s the “Uber of Carshare” – It’s Bicycle-Assisted Car Rentals

Friday, July 4th, 2014

Upshift is here, or at least it’s here in the Russian Hill and Nob Hill areas.

Here’s how it works:

“1. TAP A BUTTON – Anywhere in San Francisco. Get a car for the day with one tap. It’s that easy.

2. GET A CAR DELIVERED – Get a Small, Medium, Large, or Luxury vehicle delivered in 60 minutes. You drive it for the day & our driver rides off on a bike! Introductory rates from $49/day.

3. LEAVE IT ANYWHERE – Drop it off wherever you like in the city. We’ll come pick it up. That’s it. You’re done.”

So your rent-a-car will arrive double-parked at your front door with a green Bianchi or whatever on top and an inner-city sweathog inside. The Upshifter will simply hand you the keys and then pedal away.

Thusly:

(I’ll note that bicycle theft is an issue in San Francisco, just saying. Who’ll be the first Upshifter to lose his/her ride?)

All right, all the deets:

“Upshift is an exclusive, members only car club. Get the freedom of owning a private car with the luxury and convenience of a car service. Push a button, get a hybrid, SUV, or luxury car delivered. You drive it for a day. We pick it up when you’re done. No need to return to the same location as long as it’s in our zone (includes all of the core areas of San Francisco). We professionally operate a fleet of cars out of a single garage. Cars can only be taken out by the day only to start. Subscription pricing and recurrent bookings (eg, deliver a car every Tuesday at 7 am) for regular usage needs. The main limitation of carshare today is parking, not vehicle cost.”

Founded by Ezra Goldman. Who’s that?

“MCP, @MIT & PhD dropout. Co-founded a bikeshare in 1999. Piaggio shared EV scooters at MIT Media Lab in 2006. 2 years managing a startup in Copenhagen”

Upshift is the Uber of Carshare

Upshift makes getting out of town easy. Just push a button on your phone, get a car for the day delivered to your door, and get out of town. We’ll pick it up again anywhere in the city when you’re done, even at a different location from where we delivered, enabling a “one way” service. Payment is all done through your Upshift account, with no cash or card transactions and no paperwork.

Your next car fits in your pocket. And someday, it will drive itself to your door.

Upshift provides club members great cars on demand at the push of a button. We’ll pick up and drop off anywhere in the city- even in two different locations for one way service. Upshift provides more convenience and flexibility than car leasing with less cost, commitment and hassle.

We have spent over 2 years developing the model and getting backing from the world’s best carshare, autotech, and insurance experts around the world. Carsharing takes 9-13 cars off the road for each car we put on the road, unlocking new park space for more livable cities. We enable a transition to a car-free urban lifestyle, taking 1M cars off the streets, to save 10B pounds of CO2 per year by disrupting the car leasing market.

Upshift Twitter

Upshift FaceBook

Well, welcome to town, Upshift.

OMG, It’s Carmageddon! Forget About Parking In Front of Your House Anymore If the SFMTA’s “Car Share Vehicle” Program Comes to Your Block

Monday, June 30th, 2014

It’s a mere formality now, this plan from July 11th, 2014 to give a metric ton of street parking spaces over to ZipCar and the like.

Here’s where some public parking spaces will soon be privatized

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Hey look, even spaces on the side of the block where I live.

Like, I don’t care, but man the NIMBY’s are not going to be happy with this, NOT ONE BIT! If the spaces get used too much, it’ll piss off the NIMBYs. But if the spaces get used not that much, it will also piss off the NIMBYs.

What’s next, spaces reserved for Avis and Hertz cars? Perhaps. Why not?

If you stop in one of these spaces in your private car, you risk a ticket. If you go and actually park in one of these spaces, you know, like you’ve been doing the past two decades, well, you’re going to get towed, with extreme prejudice. And that will run you $500-$1000. So, respect!

As with every other program SFGov does, some of us will win and some of us will lose.

Oh well.

Oh, hey, what about street cleaning? Is ZipCar going to get a pass on this or will they send somebody out to move the cars for two hours (ala Kramer in Seinfeld) or will something else occur? I know not.

[UPDATE: Oh, here we go:

“Anytime we change [Jay Primus means take away when he says change but oh well] parking, there is opposition,” he said. “The challenge for the MTA and the car-sharing [he means car rental, cause you know they are rental car cos.] companies is to get awareness of the benefits of car sharing. Academic research shows that … [yada yada yada.] But we know that communicating that will be a challenge.”

Oh Jay Primus, you are a Golden God! But we, the unwashed masses are so, so ignorant! Oh Dr. Primus, please make us “aware.” Oh Dr. Primus, please educate us! And keep up the great work with MUNI – no changes please, it’s already perfect!]

OMG, Airbnb is Having a Sale – Airbnb Virgins Can Now Get One Night Free

Monday, January 13th, 2014

Or in other words:

“Book your first trip between January 13 – 17 for travel by March 31, and one night of your stay of at least two nights is on us (value up to $300).”

All the deets:

“Airbnb offers one night’s stay to all qualifying guests worldwide

Declares 2014 the “Year of the Yurt” and shares top trending destinations

SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. 13, 2014 /PRNewswire/ — Airbnb, the world’s leading community-driven hospitality company, today introduced a new offer to cover one night of travel for qualifying guests (details available at www.airbnb.com/onenight). First-time Airbnb guests who book a trip between January 13-17 for travel by March 31, for stays of at least two days, will receive a one night discount (up to $300) on their trip. With the start of the new year, Airbnb also shared the top trending destinations for 2014 – with Andorra grabbing the top spot.

“Every year people resolve to travel more, this year Airbnb wants to make that dream a reality for people all over the world,” said Amy Curtis McIntyre, CMO, Airbnb. “In 2014 we’d like to help travelers everywhere embrace the adventure and stay at one of Airbnb’s 500,000 properties worldwide.”

Airbnb is home to some of the most diverse properties on the planet and 2014 is clearly the “Year of the Yurt.” Yurts are the most popular type of property on the site followed by Treehouses, Caves, Cabins, and Boats. Yurts should watch out for Tipis as they have seen the highest year over year growth in popularity.

Over 10 million guests have stayed on Airbnb throughout its five-year history. The peak night was on New Year’s Eve 2013 with over 250,000 guests; globally a guest on Airbnb checks in every 2 seconds.

Terms & Conditions:
The discount is valid only for guests who have never completed a booking on Airbnb. To receive the discount, you must book via the Airbnb website with promo code ONENIGHT and successfully complete Airbnb’s Verified ID process prior to booking. You must complete a booking (including host acceptance) using the code between 12:00am PST (California time) on January 13 and 11:59pm PST (California time) on January 17. The discount applies to one night of your stay up to a maximum of USD$300. The cost of “one night” is calculated by averaging the base reservation rate for each night, excluding taxes or other fees charged by your host, such as cleaning fees. Your stay must be at least two nights in length at the same listing, and must begin no later than 11:59pm PST (California time) on March 31, 2014. Limit one discount per new user. The offer is valid for a single use and is not transferrable to another user or redeemable for cash. If your booking later qualifies for a refund, the maximum refund you may receive is the amount you actually paid. The code cannot be used for bookings made through Airbnb’s mobile apps. The code may not be combined with another Airbnb coupon or discount code. Host payouts will not be affected by permissible guest use of the code. Airbnb reserves the right to any remedy, including denial of the discount or cancellation of your account or reservations, if fraud, tampering, violations of Airbnb’s Terms of Service or technical errors are suspected.

About Airbnb: Founded in August of 2008 and based in San Francisco, California, Airbnb is a trusted community marketplace for people to list, discover, and book unique accommodations around the world – online or from a mobile phone. Whether an apartment for a night, a castle for a week, or a villa for a month, Airbnb connects people to unique travel experiences, at any price point, in more than 35,000 cities and 192 countries. And with world-class customer service and a growing community of users, Airbnb is the easiest way for people to monetize their extra space and showcase it to an audience of millions.

SOURCE Airbnb”

Bay Area Bike Share Declared a Huge Success by … Bay Area Bike Share

Tuesday, December 3rd, 2013

Let’s see here:

“wildly popular”

“Maddox took the opportunity to trumpet the program’s successes”

“Bike Share is popular”

But this assumes that the program costs nothing, right?

And this assumes the program is well-run, right? Is it? IDK

What I do know is that for the amount of money we’re talking about here, we could buy over 100,000 bikes and not just rent them out but simply GIVE THEM AWAY.

We’re talking about bikes that would be much lighter and have many more gears.

(I realize that giving away bikes isn’t what BABS is about, but that’s a comparison.)

What BABS is is a jobs program, one that pays workers the whopping total of $13.50 per hour.

That’s one of my beefs.

Here’s another – what does this even mean?

“In order for the program to ‘break even’ operationally, Maddox said, the program would need to expand to 2,500-3,000 bikes in total inside of San Francisco.”

You know, I went to the colledge, but I can’t for the life of me understand what “break even” means in this context.

Anywho, here’s the latest. But please remember, that the people behind this bike share program have never ever ever violated any labor laws and they’re, well, they’re the most perfect non-rent seekers ever to cut a deal with SFGov, so don’t dare to ask any questions about their Wonderful One-Hoss Shay:

“Bay Area Bike Share off to a strong start

Pilot Program prepares for full expansion in 2014

SAN FRANCISCO, Dec. 3, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — With over 178,000 miles traveled since the launch of Bay Area Bike Share, a distance that would allow a bicyclist to circle the Earth more than seven times, ridership in the popular regional bicycle sharing program continues to grow.

(Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20131203/SF26953-INFO)

The three-month-old system has now racked up more than 80,000 rides with over 3,200 annual members and more than 10,000 casual members since the program began on August 29.  More area residents and visitors continue to sign up every day, increasing momentum for the program.

“The Bay Area Bike Share program is transforming the way people travel in our region,” said Jack Broadbent, executive officer of the Air District.  “These bicycles offer an important connection for that last mile of transportation between public transit and final destinations.  The success of this program will result in long-term health and quality-of-life benefits for our region.”

The bike sharing system launched this summer with 700 mint green colored bicycles, available 24 hours a day, seven days a week at 70 stations in five cities along the Caltrain commuter rail corridor — San Francisco, Redwood City, Palo Alto, Mountain View and San Jose.  A full expansion of the pilot system in 2014 will boost those numbers to 1,000 bicycles at 100 stations.  Bay Area Bike Share is the first bike share system in the country to launch as a regionally integrated system serving cities spread out over 50 miles.

Offered as a “first and last mile solution,” as well as a stand-alone transportation option, the aim of the pilot program is to test the effectiveness of bike sharing in the region.  The program encourages Bay Area residents and visitors alike to make short trips by bike, both in conjunction with public transit and for non-transit linked trips, resulting in reduced air pollution in and around the areas served.

Significant emission reductions from the transportation sector will help protect public health and ensure the Bay Area meets state and national air quality standards while reducing greenhouse gases.

Annual Memberships: Bay Area Bike Share offers two types of annual memberships. The Pacesetter Membership ($88), includes unlimited rides up to 30 minutes each. The Frontrunner Membership ($103), also includes a t-shirt and two 24-hour memberships. For more information, please visit bayareabikeshare.com/membership.

Corporate Partnerships: Bay Area Bike Share has just launched a corporate membership program, where businesses and organizations of all sizes can offer discounted and subsidized annual memberships to employees. There are five levels of partnership that are based on company size, number of participating employees and company contribution. For more information, please visit bayareabikeshare.com.

The cost of the full pilot totals $11.2 million, and is funded using Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality ($7.1 million), Transportation Fund for Clean Air ($2.8 million) and other local funds ($1.3 million). The program is managed by the Air District in partnership with the Metropolitan Transportation Commission and local partners.

In addition to the Air District and MTC, the pilot project is a partnership among local government agencies including the City and County of San Francisco, SamTrans, Caltrain, San Mateo County Transportation Authority, the County of San Mateo, the City of Redwood City and the Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority.

Bay Area residents and visitors can learn more about the bike share system at:
      –       www.bayareabikeshare.com
      –       www.facebook.com/bayareabikeshare
      –       www.twitter.com/sfbaybikeshare

The Bay Area Air Quality Management District is the regional agency responsible for protecting air quality in the nine-county Bay Area. For more information, visit www.baaqmd.gov.

SOURCE  The Bay Area Air Quality Management District

Photo:http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20131203/SF26953-INFO
http://photoarchive.ap.org/
The Bay Area Air Quality Management District

CONTACT: Tom Flannigan, 415.749.4948

Web Site: http://bayareabikeshare.com

Let’s review:

I own more bikes than you do.

I have more miles