Posts Tagged ‘restaurants’

Shabby, Rusted Japantown – We’d All Have Been MUCH Better Off Without REDEVELOPMENT, Ch. CCLIX – Concrete And Clay And General Decay

Thursday, August 17th, 2017

Our J-Town is sort of a mess, not that I’m complaining, not that I’m calling for a “Fix-It Team” to drop everything and work on the solitary issue, that I, the monomaniacal activist, care about, no not at all. Let me explain.

All this Redevelopment stuff, all this concrete put in in the 1960’s is not up to snuff earthquake-wise – the garage, the east mall, the west mall, just entire blocks of Redevelopment. How on Earth can you bring things up to 2017-era minimal standards without spending a metric shit-ton of (non-existent) money? Well IDK.

And if even if you had the money to spend, how long would it take? How many years? What they’ve been talking about, for years/decades is an entire redo, a Re-Redevelopment, which would entail kicking out all the shops and restaurants, the bustling successful ones along with those just scraping by, and have them go … go where exactly? How about excessively wide Webster Street? I’m talking about the actual street itself – take out a couple lanes and the median and set up temporary shops, you know, Hayes Valley-style. That was a proposal.

And then, tens of millions of dollars (and who knows, nine figures?) could be poured in to seismic up.

(And to pay for this, there would have been a $100k tax on condos, so good luck with that – do you want to build up Japantown with slivers filled up with 500-1000 new condo units? Well, that’s what some people wanted.

Anyway, the moral of the story is for SFGov to not be so goddamned confident with future projects. Kind of like, “Don’t Just Do Something, Just Stand There.” And maybe we should instead spend our money on fixing up our Mistakes From The Past.

JMO.

And now, Japantown, a land of Wind and Ghosts:

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And car break-ins, of course, for tourists and locals alike. The expensive signs make everything better though, some feel:

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So you want to build a bridge, young Designers and Architects and Planners, but you don’t want to maintain it, that’s Someone Else’s Problem? You want to get it on to Make the Baby, but you don’t have the Staying Power to take care of the Baby. It sure as Hell looks that way:

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But newish banners – that’s the solution, so far:

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In the meantime, Concrete and Clay. 

And General Decay

FIN

How Sacramento Handles Letter Grades in Restaurant Windows – And How the GGRA Doesn’t Want It, At All

Tuesday, October 18th, 2016

Here’s how Sack-Town does it:

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You can see the three varieties in the bottom of the image. This is some pretty weak tea.

Fun Diego has a much better approach – real letter grades.

And Frisco, well, the Golden Gate Restaurant Association thinks all its members are above average, so it hasn’t deigned to allow SFGov to impose a letter grade requirement on food places in the 415. So why does the GGRA have such pull? IDK, that’s just the way things are.

Stanford tried showing us the way, but horrible restaurants hold sway.

Oh well.

CURFFL! – It’s Why Your Restaurant Doesn’t Have a Bathroom – Signs Say “PUBLIC RESTROOMS NOT AVAILABLE”

Friday, July 8th, 2016

Read it and weep, or hold it in, or move on:

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NEW REQUIREMENTS: New Buildings Any building constructed after January 1, 2004 must have restrooms for customers or guests, if; (a) It contains a food establishment that provides space for food consumption on the premises, or (b) It contains a food establishment 20,000 square feet or more in size.1 Existing Buildings Any building constructed between July 1, 1984 and January 1, 2004, that contains a food establishment more than 20,000 square feet in size must have restrooms available for customers (at least one for men and one for women). Buildings constructed before July 1, 1984 that contain a food establishment greater than 20,000 square feet in size, but do not have space for on-site food consumption, are not required, by this legislation, to provide restrooms for patrons, guests, or invitees (check local codes.) (When determining the size of a food establishment that is part of a service station, do not use the gas pump area of the property.) Any building constructed before January 1, 2004 that contains a food establishment that provides space designated for on-site food consumption must have at least one restroom for customers or guests on the property or in the food establishment with the following exception: Operators of food establishments in buildings constructed before January 1, 2004 that are less than 20,000 square feet in size and that have space designated for food consumption, but do not have restrooms for patrons, guests, or invitees, must post a sign in a public area stating that restrooms are not available. Toilet facilities constructed after January 1, 1985 that are accessible only from food preparation or storage areas shall not be used by customers (Section 114105).

Does San Francisco Really Have a “French Quarter?” Not Really, Despite What Microsoft Says

Friday, March 27th, 2015

Well, here it is, from the Bing Maps:

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(IDK, this is less offensive than “Uptown Tenderloin,” one supposes, you know, coming from San Francisco’s non-profit profiteers.)

French Quarter sounds a bit, grandiose?

Here’s the cure, as usual, from wilds of the Internet:

Ha. No one here knows by that name. There’s not a distinct boundary for the collection of French-serving restaurants and businesses near the French Consulate, the church and school of Notre Dame des Victoires on Bush Street. But apparently it’s been dubbed by some hotel marketing person as the “French Quarter.” Belden Alley and Claude Alley intersect with Bush Street, and each have some French cafes. On Bush/Grant Ave. is the Cafe de la Presse — a coffee house with French and international newspapers, and restaurant. There’s Cafe Claude on Claude and some other bistros. Plouf! is an excellent mussel house on Belden…”

All right, keep on Binging, Microsoft.

Day Two of SFO’s Great Airport Restaurant Strike of 2014 – Passengers Should “Bring Their Own Food?”

Friday, December 12th, 2014

Here’s yesterday’s press release about the big strike at SFO, and this morning’s is below.

And, for equal time, here’s what SFO has, which is nothing so far.

“For Immediate Release: December 12, 2014 – Contact: Laurel Fish, UNITE HERE Local 2

The Storm Continues: SFO Restaurant Strike Enters its Second Day

Dozens of Airport Eateries Partially or Completely Closed

 Passengers Alerted to Bring their Own Food

Union Files Charges with Federal Government Against Illegal Behavior

(Burlingame, CA)—The strike by nearly 1,000 restaurant workers at San Francisco International Airport entered its second and final day today, with most concession outlets experiencing partial or total shutdown.

After working without a contract for more than a year—in a region suffering from some of the worst economic inequality in the country—restaurant workers launched a two-day strike yesterday to win an agreement protecting job security and health coverage.

“These restaurant companies have forgotten that my coworkers and I are the ones who make them so successful” said Molly Gomez, a server who works at Gordon Biersch, which is operated by HMS Host. “We walked off the job to remind them of that, and to draw our customers’ attention to the fact that we deserve better.”

UNITE HERE Local 2, the hotel and restaurant workers union, issued a traveler’s advisory, urging anyone flying from SFO to bring their own food to the airport. With scores of outlets shuttered, food and beverage options for travelers are very limited.

Meanwhile, Local 2 announced that it is filing charges with the federal government against the SFO restaurant group – known as the Airport Restaurant Employers Council – for illegal coercive behavior against employees.

Media availability is located at Terminal 3 on the Departures Level of SFO.

UNITE HERE Local 2 is the hotel and restaurant workers union of San Francisco and San Mateo Counties. It represents over 12,000 workers in the region’s hospitality industries. Visit www.unitehere2.org for more information.

And here’s the list of eateries:

Andale Taqueria
Boudin’s Bakery
Buena Vista Café
Burger Joint
Cat Cora Cocktail Lounge
Dogpatch
Ebisu
Emporio Rulli
Firewood Café
Firewood Grill
Fraiche Yogurt
Go Bistro
Gordon Biersch
Guava & Java
Just Desserts
Klein’s Deli
Lark Creek Grill
Legends of San Francisco
Lori’s Diner
Max’s
Mission Bar and Grill
Napa Farms Market
Peet’s Coffee & Tea
Perry’s
PIQ
San Francisco Soup Co.
Sankaku
Soup & Salad Works
Subway
Plant Café / Pinkberry
Tomokazu
Urban Tortilla
Wakaba
Willow Creek Grille
Willow Street Pizza
Yankee Pier

What’s Across the Street from Sweet Maple? Sweet Lime, Natch – Both Have Four Yelp Stars – How Sweet It Is

Wednesday, August 6th, 2014

Sweet Lime – 2100 Sutter: 

Sweet Maple – 2101 Sutter:

Isn’t it ironic, dontcha think?

It’s like rain on your wedding day
It’s a free ride when you’ve already paid

Simple San Francisco-Based “Foodspotting” App Gets Sold to OpenTable for $10,000,000

Tuesday, January 29th, 2013

Foodspotting has been sold.

Seems like there’s not a whole lot of money to go around considering all the people involved, but you’d have to call this a pretty successful app.

Investors:

  • BlueRun Ventures (Jay Jamison)
  • Felicis Ventures (Aydin Senkut)
  • 500 Startups (Dave McClure)
  • High Line Venture Partners (Shana Fisher)
  • Zelkova Ventures
  • 2020 Ventures
  • Dave Morin, Founder and CEO of Path
  • Steve Lee, Group Product Manager for Location Based Services at Google
  • Derek Dukes, Founder and CEO of Dipity
  • Dan Martell, Cofounder of Flowtown

“OpenTable to Acquire Foodspotting

SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. 29, 2013  — OpenTable, Inc. (NASDAQ: OPEN), the world’s leading provider of online restaurant reservations, today announced that it has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire Foodspotting, an app for finding and sharing great dishes at restaurants, for approximately $10 million in cash pursuant to a stock purchase agreement. The completion of the acquisition is subject to the satisfaction of customary closing conditions.

“We’re proud to welcome the talented Foodspotting team to the OpenTable family,” said Matt Roberts, Chief Executive Officer of OpenTable.  “The Foodspotting team is as passionate about dining as we are, and we’re looking forward to leveraging their unique expertise in the areas of imagery and social sharing to enrich the OpenTable experience for diners and restaurants in new and exciting ways. By adding more visually compelling content to help people decide where to dine and discover dishes they’ll love, we hope to make it even easier to find the perfect table for any occasion.”

“We’re so happy to have found a home for Foodspotting where our community can continue to thrive while our entire team continues to focus on creating great dining experiences,” said Alexa Andrzejewski, Co-founder and Chief Executive Officer of Foodspotting, who will be joining OpenTable as a lead user interface designer.  “While working with OpenTable as partners we realized we could create more intelligent, seamless and beautiful experiences if we had the opportunity to integrate our products more deeply.  We look forward to contributing our mobile, social and design expertise in ways that will delight both diners and restaurants.”

By enabling OpenTable to deliver a richer visual and social experience for diners and provide its restaurant customers with new opportunities to showcase their offerings, the acquisition supports the Company’s focus on continuing to enhance the ways it helps diners discover and book the perfect restaurant table.  OpenTable recently added dish photos through a collaboration with Foodspotting, giving diners a small taste of the kind of enhancements that will be coming once the Foodspotting team is on board.  In addition to welcoming the Foodspotting team to OpenTable, the Company plans to maintain the Foodspotting site and mobile apps on a standalone basis.

About OpenTable, Inc.
OpenTable is the world’s leading provider of online restaurant reservations, seating approximately 10 million diners per month via online bookings across more than 26,000 restaurants. The OpenTable network connects restaurants and diners, helping diners discover and book the perfect table and helping restaurants deliver personalized hospitality to keep guests coming back. The OpenTable service enables diners to see which restaurants have available tables, select a restaurant based on verified diner reviews, menus and other helpful information, and easily book a reservation. In addition to the company’s website and mobile apps, OpenTable powers online reservations for nearly 600 partners, including many of the Internet’s most popular global and local brands. For restaurants, the OpenTable hospitality solutions enable them to manage their reservation book, streamline their operations and enhance their service levels. Since its inception in 1998, OpenTable has seated more than 385 million diners around the world.  The Company is headquartered in San Francisco, California, and the OpenTable service is available throughout the United States, as well as in Canada, Germany, Japan, Mexico and the UK. OpenTable also owns and operates toptable, the leading consumer destination site for restaurant reservations in the UK.
OpenTable, OpenTable.com, OpenTable logos, toptable and other service names are the trademarks of OpenTable, Inc. and/or its affiliates

 

“Foodspotting is a visual guide to good food and where to find it. Instead of reviewing restaurants, you can recommend great dishes and see what others recommend wherever you go.

We started Foodspotting in 2009 when we realized that there were many restaurant review apps, but there was no easy way to find or rate specific dishes. We set out to create a new kind of local guide that is unique because:

It’s about dishes, not just restaurants.

Find whatever you’re craving, see what’s good at any restaurant and learn what foodspotters, friends and experts love wherever you go.

It’s visual.

Browse photos of nearby dishes and see what looks good. We want to make finding good food as easy as looking in a bakery window.

It’s positive.

Recommend dishes by snapping photos or simply saying “Loved it!” We don’t allow negative ratings because we’re all about foods people love.

Our goal is to cover the earth with amazing food sightings, from our childhood hometowns in Pennsylvania to food capitals like Tokyo. Since launching Foodspotting in January 2010, over 2.5 million foods have been spotted around the world, but we’re counting on you to represent your city by sharing your favorite local dishes.

How it Works

To find great dishes:

  • Look up your location or move & scan the map to fine tune it.
  • Find your favorite restaurant to see what foodspotters & friends love there.
  • Search for a particular dish that you’re craving by name (noodles) or type (red velvet).
  • Follow friends and experts like Chow or Travel Channel to see what they love.
  • Bookmark foods you “Want” to try and recommend dishes you’ve “Tried” and “Loved.”

To share great dishes:

  • Share a great dish by uploading a photo or simply saying you “Loved it!”
  • Connect Instagram and tag your photos #foodspotting. Be sure to include location!
  • Keep track of what you want, try and love and organize dishes using Guides.
  • Become a dish expert by spotting 5 or more foods in the same category.
  • Earn reputation points for making quality contributions to the community.

About the Company

In January 2010, Foodspotting launched the first and leading mobile app for finding and rating dishes. Today, you can use Foodspotting to see what foodspotters, friends and experts like Chow, Travel Channel and Wolfgang Puck love wherever you go.

Featured as App of the Week in both the iPhone and Android app stores, Foodspotting has received attention from The Today Show, The Cooking Channel and Inc Magazine and was named one of Time Magazine’s 50 Best Apps of 2012 and a Top Travel Application by Travel + Leisure. Foodspotting is backed by Blue Run Ventures, Felicis Ventures, High Line Ventures, 500 Startups and Zelkova Ventures as well as a syndicate of angel investors including Dave Morin.

Based in San Francisco, Foodspotting has built a worldwide community of foodspotters who love to find and share interesting dishes wherever they go.”

So, Mayor Ed Lee Wants Restaurant Health Scores on Yelp But Not Posted On-Site the Way LA and NYC Do It?

Thursday, January 17th, 2013

Does area Republican and Mayor Ed Lee backer Ron Conway own a piece of Yelp? ‘Cause that’s all that I can think of after seeing this doozie of a press release, below.

So let’s stop the party for a second here, Yelpers:

First, tell me this, tell me why San Francisco doesn’t require restaurants to post their latest Health Department scores “prominently” for tout le monde to see.  You know, the way the do it in New York City and Los Angeles:

Instead, you want people to log on to Yelp and read the Yelp ads?

Is that “leadership?”

No it’s not, Interim Mayor Ed Lee.

Hey, wasn’t it your political faction what put the kibosh on the effort to require the posting of grades where they belong?

Yes it was.

Wasn’t that kind of an “Open Data movement” kind of a thing back then?

Yes it was.

Hey, Ed Lee! Why not require San Francisco restaurants to post their scores where people can see them?

That’s what most diners want, right?

Check it, right from the Frisco Zagat:

“An overwhelming 83% of San Francisco surveyors say they agree that restaurants should be required to conspicuously post a letter grade reflecting the results of their health department inspection (as recently passed in NYC, taking a cue from LA).”

All right, here it is, the press release from Fantasyland.

(NB: “Haters” aren’t born, they’re made.)

“WASHINGTON, Jan. 17, 2013 — Today Mayor Edwin M. Lee, Chairman of the US Conference of Mayors Technology and Innovation Task Force, and Yelp CEO and Co-founder Jeremy Stoppelman announced the initial integration of city-provided restaurant health score information on the site that connects people with great local businesses. San Francisco will lead the charge on this innovative effort to make valuable government data more easily accessible to the public; New York City restaurant grades will also be added as business attributes in the weeks ahead.

(Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20050511/SFW134LOGO)

Working with the technology departments of San Francisco and New York, Yelp’s engineering team designed the Local Inspector Value-entry Specification (LIVES) which enables local municipalities to accurately upload restaurant health inspection scores to Yelp’s database. Consumers in SF and NYC will be the first to benefit from this partnership upon the full rollout in the weeks ahead. Philadelphia is also expected to participate along with other municipalities that adopt the new specification.

“This new partnership with Yelp to offer restaurant health inspection scores on its site is another significant step in the Open Data movement,” said Mayor Lee. “By making often hard-to-find government information more widely available to innovative companies like Yelp, we can make government more transparent and improve public health outcomes for our residents through the power of technology.”

“Increasing the transparency and accessibility of important public information is another example of how San Francisco, New York and other municipalities are leading the charge in bettering citizens lives by fostering innovation,” said Jeremy Stoppelman, CEO and Co-founder of Yelp. “It’s exciting to be a part of an important initiative to disseminate valuable health department information to the 84 million unique visitors that turn to Yelp each month on average.”

According to a study in the Journal of Environmental Health(1) (March 2005), Los Angeles County’s decision to require restaurants to display hygiene grade cards on their entrances led to a 13 percent decrease in hospitalizations due to food borne illness. The study also demonstrated that the mandatory public display of these health grades improved the overall average score of restaurants in Los Angeles by incentivizing improved best practices across the local industry. As a leading website and app for dining decisions, Yelp’s open data initiative LIVES stands to empower consumers and improve the quality of life within the cities that participate in the program.

Details about and screenshots of the LIVES implementation can be found at yelp.com/healthscores.

About Yelp

Yelp (NYSE: YELP) connects people with great local businesses. Yelp was founded in San Francisco in July 2004. Since then, Yelp communities have taken root in major metros across the US, Canada, UK, Ireland, France, Germany, Austria, The Netherlands, Spain, Italy, Switzerland, Belgium, Australia, Sweden, Denmark, Norway, Finland, Singapore and Poland. Yelp had a monthly average of 84 million unique visitors in Q3 2012(2). By the end of Q3 2012, Yelpers had written more than 33 million rich, local reviews, making Yelp the leading local guide for real word-of-mouth on everything from boutiques and mechanics to restaurants and dentists. Yelp’s mobile application was used on 8.2 million unique mobile devices on a monthly average basis during Q3 2012.

(1) Source: Journal of Environmental Health,http://kuafu.umd.edu/~ginger/research/JEH-final.pdf

(2) Source: Google Analytics

Examples of LIVES implementation:
http://www.yelp.com/biz/cocobang-san-francisco
http://www.yelp.com/biz/delessio-market-and-bakery-san-francisco-2
http://www.yelp.com/biz/eats-san-francisco

Media contacts:

Christine Falvey
Mayor’s Office of Communications
christine.falvey@sfgov.org
415-554-6131

Stephanie Ichinose
Yelp, Inc
stephanie@yelp.com
415-908-3679

SOURCE  Yelp

Photo:http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20050511/SFW134LOGO
http://photoarchive.ap.org/
Yelp

Attention Shoppers: Grocery Stores to Start Charging for Bags October 1, 2012 – BYOB – Bring Your Own Bag

Monday, August 13th, 2012

This new tax is a done deal.

Check it: 

Click to expand

Divisadero Update: The Former Auto Body Garage at 834 Divis is Now a Parking Garage, $225 Per Month

Thursday, June 7th, 2012

I don’t know, seems a bit of an awkward place to pahk thah cah in the DivCoNoPaWesternAddition, but this new yellow and blue sign from CALIFORNIAPARKING doesn’t lie:

Click to expand

Ah, how things have changed

“Western Edition
Near: The Independent Pandhandel, Haight Ashbury Area, restaurants 
834 Divisadero St.”

Will the place become the Barrel Head Brewhouse sometime soon? I know not.

Ivan Hopkinson
Managing Partner
838 Divisadero Street
(415) 745-1570
ivan@barrelheadsf.com

But anyway,  this 50-foot-wide building from 1916 is what you get for your hard-earned $2.3 million these days:

“Concrete auto repair building on 2 floors. 50 foot frontage on Divisadero St. Lease is up very soon. NC-2 zoning with potential for many commercial uses. Schematics available for a adding 4 residential units above the existing building. VACANT.”