Posts Tagged ‘restored’

Gold Mountain Mural in North Beach is Gone, Long Gone, Owing to Graffiti Vandals – Why We Can’t Have Nice Things

Friday, March 9th, 2012

The news of this mural going away had escaped my attention the past couple of months.

Here’s what it looked like before….

…and here’s what it looks like now:

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Here are your reading notes:

Gen Fujioka of the Chinatown Community Development Center is involved with promoting the horrible Central Subway to Nowhere.

Artist Ann Sherry is fortunate to get a five-figure commission for anything, so I’m not sure why she’s so perpetually cranky. 

It’s not smart to put up images of authority figures (you know, people in military of police uniforms) in a sort of wild part of town

I don’t know, maybe this was a bad idea from the start?

I don’t know, maybe San Francisco government has lots of bad ideas, you know, from the start?

What can we learn from this episode?

The Longest-Lived Mural Graffiti in San Francisco – Epoxy Plus Paint Equals Forever

Tuesday, March 16th, 2010

Here’s what the little monsters know – they know that if they tag a big old transformer box or what have you, then it’ll simply get painted over by the City or a property owner, sometimes with a quickness. But painting over a mural, such as the one called Gold Mountain at Romolo Place in North Beach near the intersection of Columbus and Broadway, well that throws all the stakeholders into paralysis and so scribblings will remain for tout le monde to see.

Ideally, you’d have the original muralist come over and do a touchup for free. Ideally. But the long-lived tagging on Gold Mountain has epoxy in it, so it’s really hard to take off of the wall without erasing everything. And then after you do a fix-up another tagger will come along, despite your use of anti-graffiti coatings and whatnot.

Here, take a look at the mural on Romolo from six-plus years ago – nice and clean.

But WholeWheatToast‘s photo from 2008 looks just like every other recent photo that you can find online:

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Here’s the current shot from Google Maps. (Note that Google’s face-blurring privacy program doesn’t distinguish betwixt real people and paintings of people.)

And the pic on MapJack looks the same as well. Oh well.

Now honestly, I’m not sure how much good putting up video cameras would do unless you had somebody to watch a live feed 24-7. I mean the value of showing the SFPD grainy night-time footage of some skinny, 5′ 8″, hoodie-wearing hood isn’t much, right?

For all I know these tags are still there today, with more added on, possibly. I’ll check it out the next time I’m in the area.

(San FranciscoThe City That Knows How®… to sit around and dawdle. Oh well.)

Leaving you with what the Chinatown Community Development Center has to say about all this:

“Gold Mountain Mural Restoration

The Gold Mountain Mural is located at Romolo Alley, near Broadway and Columbus, on the side of the Swiss American building owned and managed by Chinatown CDC. It is the joint effort of Ms. Ann Sherry, the muralist, and Chinatown CDC depicting the lives of Chinese Americans in San Francisco. It was created in 1994, and once restored in 2004 due to heavy tagging. At that time, to honor her, we added the image of our local heroine, Ms. Betty Ann Ong. Ms. Ong is the American Airline stewardess who was the first one to contact ground crew informing them of the plane being hijacked on that fatal flight into the World Trade Center on 9/11.

Recently, this historic mural caught the eyes of the President of the National Museum of Murals and Mosaics in Philadelphia, and will be featured in their online museum website.

Once again, due to tagging, we will start restoring the mural in the near future. We have so far secured some funding to install surveillance cameras to safeguard the mural. Once restoration is complete, we will daily monitor the mural and assist the SFPD to apprehend taggers. (Volunteers interested to help can contact Cathie Lam at 415-984-1461.)

The Only Way to Tour San Francisco is on Top of a Giant Yellow Fire Truck

Friday, July 24th, 2009

Fat Tire Planet wants to drive you around town in their open-top fire truck from the 1960′s. Fair enough.

Will the ride up Anza Hill (did I date an Anza Hill in college? Something close to that.) on bloody Masonic Avenue in the western Western Addition / NOPA area inspire you to stand up and raise your arms in the air like you just don’t care? Possibly.

Yes, this 1968 Howe Defender 90 just might feel like a roller coaster on the hilly streets of San Francisco. As seen near Mervyn’s Heights:

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But Hannah Kenney of  Corte Madera (Marin County), CA has a beef with this four-decade old piece of rolling Maker Faire. Actually, she’s developed a lot of beefs driving around by herself when she ventures south of her wealthy suburban enclave way up in the North Bay. Her concerns:

– The flood of bicycle tourists into Sausalito who tend to create traffic concerns all over the city and Marin.  

– Those little motorized yellow two-seatersthat are difficult to spot in your rearview and side-view mirrors are louder than cars, aggravating to pedestrians and are often driven by people who don’t seem to understand the rules of the road here. How are those even legal?  

– I recently had the displeasure of being stuck on Divisadero next to a lumbering yellow fire enginethat had been repurposed as a tour bus - not the quaint older type, but a modern truck: FatTirePlanet.comIn an eco-friendly town such as San Francisco, how is it possible that we [sic] can provide permits of operation to such an unnecessary mode of transport that certainly damages the environment?  

See? All you tourists are warned – stay off of  bicycles, two-seaters, and “modern” fire trucks when you visit the area.

But if you must ride on a firetruck tour, please, by all means, keep it quaint.

That is all.

HISTORY & FEATURES Prairie Prince, Pete Misthos and Morgan Raimond to lovingly restore Engine#1 to her current glory!

Engine #1 is a 1968 Howe Defender 90, used by the Contra Costa County Fire Department until her pump seized in the mid 1990s. Fat Tire Planet owner Cyrus Forootan bought her at auction in 2000, and spent 4 years working with local artists

Features include:

  • Maximum capacity of 30 people
  • Convertible, open-air 360° view
  • Comfortable padded seats
  • State-of-the-art sound system – Enjoy our music selection or bring your own!
  • Ample locked storage
  • Full catering & DJs available
  • Locally-owned and operated
  • Fully licensed and insured
About Fat Tire Planet Fire Truck Tours

Ready for a magic carpet ride?

Hop on board Engine #1, the Biggest Hot-Rod Convertible in California – Bright yellow, surrounded by red flames, she embodies the creative eccentricity of San Francisco!

Engine #1 breaks the mold of traditional touring – passengers can take in the sounds, smells and spectacular views of the city from her open-air seating deck.  No other tour vehicle can come close to bringing the most beautiful city in the United States to LIFE!

All year long, weather permitting, the fire truck is available for private parties and charters.  We have blankets, you BYOB.  Minimum 15 passengers @ $30/ person for 3 hours for charters.

During the summer season (May-October), we specialize in San Francisco city tours on a customized yellow open air fire truck with an awesome sound systemand an amazing flame job.  We can accommodate up to 25 people.

The Charming Historical Street Cars of San Francisco’s Embarcadero

Wednesday, February 18th, 2009

This is what rush hour looks like on San Francisco’s famous Embarcadero waterfront road.

These electric trolleys operated by MUNI are from all over the world.

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via Whole Wheat Toast

A Pacific Electric Railway Red Car Trolley on the Streets of San Francisco

Sunday, January 25th, 2009

San Francisco’s MUNI has it’s very own Pacific Electric Railway Red Car, #1061. The Red Car system of Los Angeles County died out, as detailed in the movie Who Framed Roger Rabbit, so the Market Street Railway decided to re-use the red-and-orange paint scheme as an homage. 

This particular PCC railcar was never in L.A. It spent most of its life in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The real El Lay vehicles were double ended – this one has a front and a rear.

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No matter, people love it anyway. Look for it on Market Street’s F-Line.