Posts Tagged ‘richmond’

Drip Drip Drip – “SF Archbishop Star of Sea Emotional Abuse Priest Scandal Grows Bigger” – Drip Drip Drip

Monday, April 27th, 2015

Well here it is, a compendium, below.

I’ll tell you, right about now is generally when the board of directors of a typical organization would be holding an emergency meeting to assess, and then take action. But my experience in such matters is limited to non-Catholic orgs. Would these matters indeed go all the way up to the Pope, the Bishop of Rome, Italy? IDK.

On It Goes

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More Trouble for Bay Area Catholics – Unearthed Lawsuit Against Father Illo for Intentional Infliction of Emotional Distress

Saturday, April 25th, 2015

Here’s today’s allegation:

“The facts of the 2005 lawsuit against Father Illo, which required him to pay $14,000 for therapy for the young girl he traumatized, are as follows:

An 11-year-old girl came to Father Illo in confidence to report an incident of sexual abuse by one of the priests in Illo’s parish in Modesto.

Upon listening to the child’s report of abuse, Fr. Illo responded by yelling at the child, calling her a liar and calling the character of the child’s mother into question.

Fr. Illo then invited the offending priest into his office, where the two of them further confronted the child.

It was only after Fr. Illo invited his secretary in the room and she found the child in a hysterical state that she was removed and the mother was called.

Fr. Illo has a sworn duty to immediately report all allegations of abuse to the police.

As part of the case, church documents detailing an internal canonical investigation were subpoenaed. This report raises questions about Fr. Illo’s leadership and referring to his personality as being “dictatorial, manipulative and insensitive.” The report recommended counseling for Fr. Illo. 

Controversy has dogged Father Illo since he was appointed by San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone to Star of the Sea Parish and School in late 2014.  After taking charge of the San Francisco parish he banned altar girls, saying only boys can be altar servers. The move sparked criticism along with his statements to parents that he planned on replacing the school’s teachers with nuns from Dominican Sisters of Mary, Mother of the Eucharist order the same nuns that walked out on students at Marin Catholic High School last week to protest an event to prevent bullying of LGBT youth.”

I’ll tell you, this school must look like a dream come true to a lot of parents who rolled snake-eyes in SFUSD’s kindergarten “lottery,” but signing your kid up there sure seems like it comes with a lot of baggage…

Hipsters Spotted _West_ of Masonic on Clement

Tuesday, April 21st, 2015

This is eastern Clement, but still:

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One thing is for certain: there is no stopping them; the hipsters will soon be here. And I for one welcome our new “effortless cool” overlords. I’d like to remind them that as a trusted blogging personality, I can be helpful in rounding up others to toil in their underground Etsy caves.

Clement Street on a Clement Day: Home of the Inner Richmond Pocket Farmer’s Market – Sunday Sunday Sundays

Friday, March 6th, 2015

It’s a little small, huh, on a dreaded sunny day, of Winter 2015.

But the people who like it like it, certainly.

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Agricultural Institute of Marin is partnering with the Clement Street Merchants Association to bring the Inner Richmond San Francisco’s newest farmers market! Join us every Sunday from 9am to 2pm, on Clement Street between 2nd and 4th Avenues, year-round…”

If San Francisco Had a City-County Border, This Would Be It

Wednesday, March 4th, 2015

Starting from the southeast, take Army/Cesar Chavez to Clipper and around Twin Peaks and up 7th Avenue and then jink over to like 11th Avenue (whatever it takes to get the dry rub chicken places of the Inner Sunset inside the City Limits – they seem pretty lively at night) and then up through GGP and the Richmond District up to the Presidio, where there’s a nice jag at 7th Avenue and then back east along West Pacific at the border and then up north along the Lyon Street Steps and then around Palace Drive all the way to the Bay and then you capture the waterfront all the way down to just north of Warm Water Cove:

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(Sorry.)

Oh, Divisadero doesn’t mean division, BTW.

How the Magic Word “VisionZero” Has NOT Changed the SFMTA’s Half-Assed Approach to Transportation Safety: “Focus On The Five”

Tuesday, February 17th, 2015

Here’s the SFMTA’s official six-figure-a-year spokesperson on the topic of when pedestrians can cross a street, from just last year:

“They can start whenever they want,” Rose said.”

Of course this is wrong, as even Paul Rose himself would admit now, after being corrected.

So, why did he say that? Because he, like his employer, has a half-assed approach to safety, and, one supposes, he, like his employer, is mired in politics.

Now do you suppose that Paul Rose was at all interested in examining why he told the peds of San Francisco that it was A-OK for them to violate CA state law? Oh no, not at all. And do you think he checked with anyone before he spouted off? Prolly not.

Like I say, a half-assed approach.

Now we’re in 2015, the era of SF VisionZero 2024, which has the goal, one that nobody actually believes in, but they have to pretend that they do believe in it, of having no more transportation deaths in San Francisco County starting in 2024 and continuing in perpetuity.

It’ll look a little something like this, supposedly:

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Now do you see the beauty in this? By the time SFGov fails to achieve this impossible goal, all the people who glibly made the promise will be out of office, right? How convenient.

The big problem with the approach that SFGov is taking is assuming that traffic deaths are a street design issue, as opposed to a human behavior issue. So most of the emphasis appears to be upon SFGov spending more money, which of course SFGov loves to do anyway.

And the part of VisionZero SF that’s focuses on behavior seems misplaced, for political reasons.

For example, there’s this:

Focus on the Five – Using multi-year collision data, the San Francisco Police Department (SFPD) is focusing on enforcing the five violations that are most frequently cited in collisions with people walking. The goal is to have half their traffic citations be for these five violations.”

So if the SFPD started handing out tickets for jaywalking, you know, in a big way, that would certainly help with traffic safety, over the long term, to at least a slight degree, but that would take the SFPD away from its “Focus On The Five” goal.

The problem with Focus On The Five is that it ignores Vehicle Code violations on behalf of pedestrians, one supposes for political reasons. In fact, the cause of most pedestrian and cyclist deaths last year in San Francisco was the behavior of the pedestrians and cyclists themselves.

And what’s this talk about “automated enforcement?” How about this, how about hooking up all of the SFMTA’s vehicles to an automated enforcement mechanism that would detect speed limit, stop sign and red light violations using on board sensors and GPS? Then, after Ed Reiskin parks his government-paid SFMTA car or an operator parks her bus, SFPD tickets would be issued, you know, daily. Whoo boy, what are the odds of something like that happening?

So that’s SF VisionZero 2024, a buzz-phrase that means absolutely nothing.

 

 

Advice for Newcomers: Here’s Why the Rent’s Cheaper Out in the West Side, Out in The Avenues, in The Sunset and The Richmond

Tuesday, February 3rd, 2015

So I don’t get this bit about The Avenues, this little ditty that’s all about informing supposed “misinformed newcomers,” ’cause it’s coming from the greatest Misinformed San Francisco Newcomer of all: Gannett Co. Inc’s The Bold Italic, a blog about the SF Bay Area and, oddly, Los Angeles too, a little bit.

I’ll tell you, I know all about the Richmond and Sunset Districts. I’ve actually lived out there, believe it or not, during part of my quarter-century in the City and County (but mostly the City) of SF. And, I’ll tell you, these quite similar areas have their good points, but also they have their bad points.

And one, just one, of these bad points is the Avenues are cut off from the rest of the city, owing to geography. And this fact isn’t helped by our famously-horrible transit system (which might at some point get better, like a BART subway to La Playa or something) but also our poorly-designed network of roads (which is congested already, by design, and is only going to get slower, by design). Things are so bad out there that bike riders are tempted use streetcar-only tunnels to get back to the City Proper.

And then there’s the fog issue, which isn’t going away no matter what. Some people living out there claim it doesn’t really exist. But it does, I knows it.

And then there’s the concomitant ironic naming issue. Let’s start with The SUNset District. Cover your eyes, avert your gaze, West Bay residents:

“If you start at the Bay Bridge and head west along most major streets in San Francisco, you’ll eventually get to a magical land of misery known as the Sunset. The name is a joke, and perhaps even a way to trick tourists: The sun rarely visits the Sunset, not even when it sets. The primary weather element in the Sunset is fog—thick, endless, depressive clouds of it that wash up from the ocean to completely saturate the land. I lived in the Sunset for a single, terrible year. Before I moved there, I used to be one of those snobby city-dwellers who’d look down on suburbanites who couldn’t handle San Francisco’s famously capricious climate. I’d heard the Sunset’s weather wasn’t great, but hey, how bad could it be?

It was bad. Too bad for me; after our lease was up, my wife and I moved to the suburbs. Looking back, what bothered me most wasn’t the terrible climate—though I did hate it—but the vast difference between the Sunset’s weather and the weather everywhere else. Whatever meteorological patterns applied in normal parts of San Francisco didn’t seem to apply to the Sunset, which meant that forecasts for the city held no sway there. If the weatherman said it was going to be 80 and sunny, it was probably 55 and cloudy at my house.

And now, let’s move on to The Richmond District:

“Did the sand dunes in the northwest corner of the city look like Richmond, Australia? One story for the naming of the district is that early settler George Turner Marsh thought so, and named the area around his home such. (Other sources credit a neighborhood booster named George Fletcher for suggesting the name.)”

I’ll tell you, the average daytime temperature in Richmond, Victoria [not the other Richmond in NSW, which is prolly even hotter], Australia these days is 84 degrees freaking Fahrenheit – isn’t it ironic, dontcha think?

So, transportation and climate are just two reasons why rents are lower Out There in The Outer Lands, in the Great Sand Waste, you know, in comparison with the City Proper.

I could go on and on, and, as a matter of fact, I have, and it pisses some people off. Sorry. I just don’t understand why certain people are so defensive about where they live.

So enjoy your pride, Avenues People…

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…but please don’t mislead those “misinformed newcomers,” as you call them.

Especially if you yourself is a well-financed but struggling start-up blog hailing from a Fortune 500 company out of Northern Virginia…

Cat, Grow, and Halfway: Know Your Sunset and Richmond District Houses – Fogbelt Paradise

Friday, January 30th, 2015

Most of San Francisco’s murders take place in the giant “S” that snakes from the Twitterloin through SoMA, through Hayes Valley, through La Mision, and then on down to Bayview / Hunters Point and Visi Valley.

Year after year.

But occasionally we get murders out in San Francisco County, in the Avenues, the suburbs. And those tend to be associated with your cat houses, your grow houses, and your halfway houses.

Most of the time, except for a few dreaded sunny days, these houses operate in the shadows, in the enveloping fog, quietly chugging out money for a select few.

Chugga chugga chugga chugga chugga chugga:

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It’s a kind of paradise, I suppose, for a select few.

(Somebody ought to Kickstart a 40-minute film called Sunset Vice, as if it were one episode of a police procedural shown on network TV…)

8000 Cal, 94121: What the End of California Street Looks Like at the Lincoln Park Steps – Big Art

Tuesday, January 13th, 2015

The Richmond District Blog has the deets.

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I gotta say, I approve of quiet groups who actually do things. You know, LESS YAMMER, MORE HAMMER

Well, Here It Is, The Richmond District’s New Academy: The SF Baseball Academy – Inside of the Old Bridge Theatre

Thursday, January 8th, 2015

Here it is, this mothership is fully operational – the open house was last month.

The marquee, oddly, used to sing the praises of Supervisor Mark Farrell, until recently:

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Read all about it from this bit in the San Francisco Chronicle. Noteworthy:

“He hit a bit of a rough patch while in college. On a visit home for the holidays in 2007, he got embroiled in the infamous “Baker’s Dozen” incident, in which a group of visiting Yale students got into a fight with some hometown boys at a New Year’s party. Though he was a latecomer to the fisticuffs, Aicardi was named in a civil suit seeking damages, along with his brother Richard. In the end, no charges were filed against him and the matter was settled privately...”

In other words, settled privately for big bucks. I’ll just add that the straight-shooting Matier and Ross team had a different take on the “I’m 20 deep and my boys are coming” incident, where jelly and beer were mixed in a quite unappealing fashion. If somebody wanted to say, well, I’ve made a public apology and I’m struggling to move on, ala Sheriff Ross Mirkarimi, well, it’s never too late to do something like that, whether you claim you’re barred from doing so or not. Moving on…

I used to turn the lights on at an old Landmark theatre and the all the fuse panels looked a little like this – I’ll tell you, the monthly electricity bill was through the roof, it was a major expense. I’m sure it was similar at the Bridge. Like, even if somebody gave the building to you for free, would it be worth the time and money to operate it as a theatre? I don’t think it was.

So maybe this academy will make money or maybe it’s more a labor of love. We’ll see.