Posts Tagged ‘ride’

“Warbiking San Francisco?” – RSA Convention Goer Rides a Bike in SF to Show Insecure WiFi Networks

Thursday, February 27th, 2014

What does this teaser video mean to you?

“James Lyne “war-bikes” the city of San Francisco with special WiFi equipment to find out just how much information its citizens are giving away. Join us at RSA Conference booth #2701 to hear a live talk from James Lyne and Chester Wisniewski on their findings.”

If You Want to Get From the Panhandle to Downtown Quickly, Forget About the Wiggle and Just Take Oak

Friday, February 7th, 2014

Thusly:

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If you want. There’s really only one block that’s kind of steep, but think of all the stop signs you won’t have to blow through.

They used to have a kind of bike lane on the left side of Oak but it’s gone now.

But the right side looks all right and traffic doesn’t move all that fast so it works.

(Coming back is a different story, much steeper going uphill on neighboring Fell and Page.)

Happy trails.

The Cyclists of the 280 – Legally Riding Your Bike on “The Most Beautiful Freeway in the World,” San Mateo County

Monday, December 2nd, 2013

Yes, the 280, the Junipero Serra, aka the Most Beautiful Freeway in the World.

Anyway, Brocephus here is using his bike on an onramp heading north.

And it’s legal. Check it:

Riding Your Bike on the Freeway in California: It’s Not as Illegal as You Might Think – As Here, on the 101 in Marin County

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Enjoy!

Bicycle Fatality on the I-80 at University in Berkeley Raises the Question: Can You Ride a Bike on a Freeway?

Saturday, June 1st, 2013

Consider this morning’s news:

Katie Utehs ‏@katieutehs2h - All lanes of eastbound 80 blocked for bicycle vs. collision at University. @ktvupic.twitter.com/iIHtmZJ8bw

Is it legal to ride a bike on the freeways  of California?

No, not on the very urbanized part in Berkeley I don’t think.

But bike riding is legal on other certain stretches of freeway.

The details:

“We’re not talking about temporarily closing down a freeway to cars on Father’s Day like they did in Pasadena a while back, to the horror of Rob Anderson.

And we’re not talking about an illegal bicycle romp in traffic the way the Crimanimalz do it on the 405.

We’re talking about you legally riding your bike on the right side of some of California’s 4000 miles of freeway.

Well, according to the California Department of Transportation, maker of melty orange and blue cupcakes, sí, se puede. Yes, you can ride your bike on about 1000 miles of California freeway.

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For proof, check out this white sign in Marin County on the 101 South. You see? It says “BICYCLES MUST EXIT” so that means, assuming you didn’t ignore any ”Bicycles Prohibited” sign, it’s all good for you to be on this stretch of freeway. Q.E.D. Res Ipsa Loquitur.

Here’s the CalTrans version:

Of the more than 4,000 miles of freeways in California, about 1,000 miles are open to bicyclists. These open sections are usually in rural areas where there is no alternate route. California Vehicle Code Section 21960 says Caltrans and local agencies may prohibit bicyclists from traveling on freeways under their jurisdiction and that they must erect signs stating the prohibition. There are no signs permitting bicyclists on freeways. When a bicyclist is legally traveling on a freeway, he/she may be directed off the freeway at the next off-ramp by a sign that says “Bicycles Must Exit.” The freeway will be posted at the next on-ramp with a sign that says “Bicycles Prohibited.”

And here’s the Vehicle Code:

21960.  (a) The Department of Transportation and local authorities,
by order, ordinance, or resolution, with respect to freeways,
expressways, or designated portions thereof under their respective
jurisdictions, to which vehicle access is completely or partially
controlled, may prohibit or restrict the use of the freeways,
expressways, or any portion thereof by pedestrians, bicycles or other
nonmotorized traffic or by any person operating a motor-driven
cycle, motorized bicycle, or motorized scooter.  A prohibition or
restriction pertaining to bicycles, motor-driven cycles, or motorized
scooters shall be deemed to include motorized bicycles; and no
person may operate a motorized bicycle wherever that prohibition or
restriction is in force.  Notwithstanding any provisions of any
order, ordinance, or resolution to the contrary, the driver or
passengers of a disabled vehicle stopped on a freeway or expressway
may walk to the nearest exit, in either direction, on that side of
the freeway or expressway upon which the vehicle is disabled, from
which telephone or motor vehicle repair services are available.
(b) The prohibitory regulation authorized by subdivision (a) shall
be effective when appropriate signs giving notice thereof are
erected upon any freeway or expressway and the approaches thereto.
If any portion of a county freeway or expressway is contained within
the limits of a city within the county, the county may erect signs on
that portion as required under this subdivision if the ordinance has
been approved by the city pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section
1730 of the Streets and Highways Code.
(c) No ordinance or resolution of local authorities shall apply to
any state highway until the proposed ordinance or resolution has
been presented to, and approved in writing by, the Department of
Transportation.
(d) An ordinance or resolution adopted under this section on or
after January 1, 2005, to prohibit pedestrian access to a county
freeway or expressway shall not be effective unless it is supported
by a finding by the local authority that the freeway or expressway
does not have pedestrian facilities and pedestrian use would pose a
safety risk to the pedestrian.

The Time-Honored Tradition of Practicing for Your Motorcycle Driving Test at the DMV, Even Though Its Agin the Law

Tuesday, February 19th, 2013

Like this:

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And you can’t ride your bike through the parking lot neither, but I do that all the time.

Oh Fell Street DMV, will you ever win?

Riding Your Bike, Slowly, on the Sidewalks of San Francisco: The Victimless Crime

Thursday, December 20th, 2012

Like this – dude was going black after block:

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Sky-View Tour, Western Addition, USA

Friday, November 9th, 2012

Little squirt looks a bit bored back there, but most of these tourists seem to enjoy taking the 2-hour Sky View Tour of San Francisco.

Now, do these tour buses really make Alamo Square “the Wild West?” No, not at all. So, why did former Interim Supervisor Christina Olague say such a thing?

Well, because she was running for election and she didn’t want to piss-off the hyper-sensitive homeowners of the Western Addition.

Did that work?

Non.

Oh, and are the diesel engines much louder than any loudspeakers that non-tourists might hear?

Oui.

So, here they come, day after day:

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Do you hate tourists?

I don’t.

OMG, It’s “Zeppelin Flight Timelapse: San Francisco, California!” – Video of Cruising Low and Slow Over the 415

Wednesday, October 3rd, 2012

Here’s what the Bay Area’s big Zeppelin looks like from San Francisco…

…and here’s what San Francisco looks like from the Bay Area’s big Zeppelin:

Ah, mem’ries:

Passing by Coit Tower:

A close up view, click to enlarge. Can you see pilot Fritz Guenther and his Peltor brand headphones? Sure you can.

And an adorable piggly tail in the back:

There we go, back to normal:

OMG, Ride the E-Line “Twin Torpedos” for Free This Weekend! Volunteer to be a Temporary Streetcar Docent

Monday, October 1st, 2012

How would you like to volunteer as a docent helping out with the new-school / old-school E-line on October 6-7, 2012?

First, some background about how busy the 415 will be this weekend:

“Looking at what’s scheduled for that weekend, there might not be room in the city for many more people, much less cars. First, there’s the free Hardly Strictly Bluegrass Festival in Golden Gate Park, a three-day event that drew about 800,000 people last year. That Sunday afternoon, the 49ers play the Buffalo Bills at Candlestick Park, while the Giants are hoping for weekend playoff games at AT&T Park, all guaranteed sellouts. About 60,000 people typically attend the Castro Street Fair, scheduled for that Sunday, while thousands more will jam North Beach for the annual Italian Heritage Parade at 12:30 on the same day. A different crowd will probably be at the Burning Man Decompression street fair, also that Sunday afternoon. To add to the fun, two mega cruise ships are expected to dock at Pier 35 over the weekend, disgorging thousands more tourists. Then, of course, there’s Fleet Week, which brings thousands of sailors and as many as a million visitors to the waterfront for the weekend.”

So you’ll be needed to help out all the visitors moving around on the Twin Torpedos, streetcars 1006 and 1008:

“We need several more docents to work the stops along the E-line on October 6 and 7, helping riders find the right platform and providing information about the service. We have docent books prepared by Paul Lucas, so it’s easy to learn what to do. If you’re interested, send us an email and we’ll get back to you.”

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Act now.

Today on KQED-FM at 10:00AM: “Critical Mass, 20 Years Later” – Michael Krasny – Commute Clot Anniv.

Monday, September 24th, 2012

Well, today’s the start of San Francisco Critical Mass Week 2012.

Michael Krasny of KQED Forum will kick things off with a one-hour show on the history of Critical Mass.

And then festivities will end, of course, this Friday with the big 20th Anniversary Ride the evening of September 28th, 2012. (Not that you’d know it from the San Francisco Bicycle Coalition website’s ”Chain of Events” section, where all info about CM* is now censored.)

Suddenly surrounded by bicycles:

All the deets:

“It started with a bike ride in San Francisco on Sept. 25, 1992. About 50 people cycled in a pack along Market Street, hoping to earn some respect from drivers who sometimes ignored them or edged them off the road. They called it the “Commute Clot.” Today it’s known as Critical Mass, a movement that’s spread worldwide. Supporters say it promotes cycling and the rights of bicyclists. But critics say it is illegal, clogs traffic and antagonizes drivers. We talk about Critical Mass’ 20th anniversary, and its effects on the city.

Host: Michael Krasny

Guests:

Chris Carlsson, co-founder of Critical Mass who was part of the first ride on Sept. 25, 1992, and has since participated in Critical Mass rides in Milan, Vancouver and Porto Alegre, Brazil

Hugh D’Andrade, founder of SFCriticalMass.org

Rob Anderson, blogger on transportation issues and author of the blog District 5 Diary

Tune in at 10:00 on your radio or on your device, Listen Live.

*The SFBC raises money through fees but it also gets mucho dinero directly from SFGov. So that’s why it endorsed Ed Lee for Mayor even though SFBC’s members generally did not and still do not like Ed Lee. Similarly, Chrstina Olague, Mayor Ed Lee’s hand-picked recruit for District 5 Supervisor, gets endorsed over Julian Davis even though SFBC members actually favor JD. The SFBC is basically a quasi-government agency now, so it’s very afraid of seeming to say something negative about certain members of the City Family. It’s also afraid of hurting the chances of its officers someday getting jobs / health care directly with SFGov / SFMTA. Anyway, that’s why the SFBC is basically a SFGov kiss-ass these days. It will lobby San Francisco government, certainly, but that’s about as far as it wants to go. (Think about it – who would the SFMTA endorse for Mayor?)