Posts Tagged ‘San Francisco Arts Commission’

Gavin Newsom Calls for More Giant Glittering Sidewalk Eggs: “Market Street Should Have 100 of These Damn Things”

Friday, December 10th, 2010

San Francisco’s most productive journalist these days has got to be Steve Rhodes – the man is out there in the field reporting on things All The Time.

As it was last night, when S.R. was on hand to catch Mayor Gavin Newsom encountering the debut of The ARTery Project,” which is:

“An exciting series of art events, fairs, installations and performances taking place along Market Street between UN Plaza and 6th Street.”

O.K. then.

Gavin experiencing the sidewalk eggs of famous Robert James:

Via Steve Rhodes

And let’s let Steve tell us what Gavin was saying last night:

Market st should have 100 of these damn things. I can say that now that I only have 30 days.”

A few minutes later shaking a man’s hand: “It is good to see art out here”

There’s still more to do.

O.K. then.

I think I missed all that fuss, passing by a little while later. (You could tell something arty was going on just by the number of art student-types milling about the Mid Market.)

All the deets, below.

Sidewalk egg and sign, Market Street, USA:

Lights on Market Street:

Join the San Francisco Arts Commission on Thursday, December 9 from 5-7 p.m.for the launch of The ARTery Project, which kicks off its exciting series of events with the debut of three site-specific light installations by artists Jim Campbell, Theodore Watson and Paul Notzold and art openings at the luggage store, Central City Hospitality House Community Arts Program, and Gray Area Foundation for the ArtsClick here for more information.

Calling All Artists: Win $6000 by Illustrating San Francisco’s 3rd Street Corridor

Thursday, March 11th, 2010

From San Francisco City Attorney Dennis Jose Herrera comes news of the Bayview Merchants Association‘s Third Street Corridor Project – how would you like to earn $6000 just for creating 6-10 iconic images illustrating the Lower Third?

Get all the deets below. And after you get paid, be sure to forward ten percent to me, your new agent. (Affirm our agreement by reading this sentence - welcome aboard.) But get cracking, as your first deadline is March 22nd, 2010.

You can’t win if you don’t play!

Introduction to the Project

The 3rd Street Corridor project is searching for local artists to create a series of 6-10 iconic images to represent the Bayview Hunters Point District of San Francisco. These images will be stylized illustrations of local landmarks that capture the spirit of this part of the city and will be used on a series of street banners and other collateral such as T-shirts. An example of a similar campaign is artist Michael Schwab’s series of prints for the Golden Gate National Parks.

Final selections for scenery will be communicated to the artist at the time of the commission. These scenes may include:

  • Bayview Opera House
  • T-Line
  • Quesada Gardens
  • View of Downtown from 3rd
  • Shipyards
  • Candlestick Park
  • Local Art and Murals
  • MLK Municipal Pool
  • Bayview Library
  • Industrial Buildings

Candidate Selection

The ideal candidate for this commission will be a local artist who lives and/or works in the Bayview Hunters Point District of San Francisco and can bring his or her personal style into the project and offer an authentic view of these neighborhoods. The artist must also be able to work within the established color palette of the 3rd Street logo (red, yellow, green and black- see samples for reference). To be considered for this project please submit three (3) JPEG images of your past work that best communicates your style. If you are selected as a finalist you may be commissioned to create one sample illustration before the final contract for the rest of the series.

Compensation

The selected artist will receive a $6,000 stipend for the final series of images. Artwork and reproduction rights will become property of the Third Street Corridor Project. In the event that finalists are asked to create a sample illustration as part of the selection process then they will be compensated $500 for their time.

Application Deadline

To be considered for this project, please email three JPEG samples of your work, a brief description of your background and a written statement of why you think you would be an ideal candidate for this project to bayviewmerchantsassociation@gmail.com no later than

MONDAY, MARCH 22, 12:00pm.

Project Schedule

March 22: Artists application deadline.

March 24: Artist finalists selected.

Mid April: Final selection of artist. Work on final illustrations begins.

May 24: Final illustrations complete.

June 11: Public unveiling of art on 3rd Street.

Questions/Details?

Call Ben Kaufman, Outreach Coordinator of the Bayview Merchants’ Association, at 415-647-3728 x407 if you have any further questions.

Upper Crust Sculpture from Patrick Dougherty in Civic Center Continues – Docent Tour Today

Tuesday, December 1st, 2009

Luis R. Cancel, director of Cultural Affairs for the San Francisco Arts Commission, would like you to know that Patrick Dougherty’s Upper Crust, which was supposed to end yesterday, has been extended through February. Here’s what it looks like.  

And there’ll be an official, one-hour First Tuesday of the Month Docent Tour to explain What It All Means starting at noon today, Tuesday, December 1, 2009. Just head to Civic Center and find the group of people looking up at the eucalyptuseses.

Like these. Those branches added to the trees? That’s part of Upper Crust.*

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via Shapeshift

(Hey, whatever happened to our Civic Center Victory Garden this past summer? We had one last year, right? Isn’t this kind of thing a “growing movement” or whatever? So what gives? Speaking of which, when is the Great Lawn of Civic Center going to come back? We lost it ’cause of Victory Garden ’08, but now we have no garden and no lawn, we’re left with just a plane of plain gravel. Mmmm…)

Anywho, if you can’t make it to the tour, SFMike’s Civic Center Blog has lots and lots of info.

All the deets after the jump.

*I was s’posed to tell you about this exhibit last year, but the official photos that I was going to post (from a City-favored “woman/minority-owned business contractor” or something) were unusable in a unique, headache-inducing OMG-Canon-SLR-with-a-bright-flash-but-the-body-is-not-in-Manual-Mode kind of way, so I forgot about the whole thing. My bad. Could I provide The City with list of hungry-for-work women/minority-owned small businesses that would have done a competent or better-than-competent job? Oh yes, easily. Oh well.

(more…)

Language of the Birds in North Beach Recognized as One of America’s Best Public Artworks

Monday, July 6th, 2009

Have you seen this one yet? Read all about it, below.

Click to expand:

3058958219_7e23cdd67e_b copy

via Steve Rhodes

The San Francisco Arts Commission’s The Language of the Birds Recognized as One of America’s Best Public Artworks at the 2009 Americans for the Arts Convention in Seattle.

San Francisco, CA, June 26, 2009– Luis R. Cancel, director of cultural affairs for the San Francisco Arts Commission, is pleased to announce that The Language of the Birds, a permanent site-specific sculpture by San Francisco artists Brian Goggin and Dorka Keehn located at the intersection of Broadway and Columbus avenues, was selected as one of the best public artworks in the United States at the 2009 Americans for the Arts convention held in Seattle from June 18–20. During the annual Public Art Year in Review session, two independent art experts, artists Janet Echelman and Mildred Howard, presented 40 of their top choices for the most innovative permanent or temporary public artworks created or debuted in 2008. The Language of the Birds was chosen from more than 300 entries from across the country.

“Since its dedication in November, The Language of the Birds has brought excitement and poetry to a dense urban streetscape, transforming one of the City’s busiest intersections into a destination. The artwork also set a new precedent as the first solar power-offset public artwork in California,” stated Luis R. Cancel. “We are proud to receive this honor as it brings national attention to San Francisco’s community of pioneering local artists and exemplary Public Art Program, which is deeply committed to enriching our City by commissioning new artworks of the highest standards.”

In addition to Brian Goggin and Dorka Keehn, San Francisco-artists JD Beltran and Scott Minneman’s recent project Downtown Mirror located in downtown San Jose and Teresa Camozzi’s Now Becomes Memories, Tomorrow Becomes Now at the Haggard Library in Plano, Texas also received recognition at the Public Art Year in Review session.

According to Supervisor David Chiu, “The Language of the Birds has become an iconic landmark for District 3 where locals and tourists alike stop to marvel at the installation. I congratulate Brian Goggin and Dorka Keehn along with the other San Francisco-based artists on achieving such an honor. Their work has helped distinguish this City as a world-class destination for arts and culture.”  

For nine years the Americans for the Arts, the nation’s leading nonprofit organization for advancing the arts in America, has recognized public artworks.  The artists and commissioning organizations involved in creating and citing the recognized public artworks will receive letters of recognition and congratulations from Americans for the Arts President and CEO Robert L. Lynch.

For more information about The Language of the Birds, visit the “Press Release” section at www.sfartscommission.org/pubartcollection or contact Kate Patterson at kate.patterson@sfgov.org.

ABOUT THE SAN FRANCISCO ARTS COMMISSION AND THE PUBLIC ART PROGRAM
Established by charter in 1932, the San Francisco Arts Commission is the City agency that champions the arts in San Francisco. Led by the belief that a creative cultural environment is essential to the City’s well-being, the Arts Commission programs permeate all aspects of City life. Programs include: Civic Art Collection, Civic Design Review, Community Arts & Education, Cultural Equity Grants, Public Art, SFAC Gallery, Street Artist Licensing, and summer in the City Concert Series.
The Arts Commission’s Public Art Program was established by the City Arts Enrichment Ordinance in 1969, as one of the first of its kind in the country. The Public Art Program seeks to promote a diverse and stimulating cultural environment to enrich the lives of the city’s residents, visitors and employees. The Program encourages the creative interaction of artists, designers, city staff, officials and community members during the design of City projects in order to develop public art that is specific to the site and meaningful to the community.