Posts Tagged ‘san francisco citizen’

OMG, Now You Can Read “The Real Ed Lee – The Untold, Untold Story” Book Online With Searchable Text – Just Click the Link

Thursday, November 3rd, 2011

Apparently, there aren’t enough printing presses available in the Bay Area to keep up with the enormous demand the public has for The Real Ed Lee – The Untold, Untold, Story.” 

(Uh…, moving on.) 

Anyway, the upshot is that now you can see the text online in a searchable format. See below.

(Or kick it old-school with Bluoz, your choice.)

Click to expand

To review:

“The book goes through the details of how Lee rose through the ranks at City Hall, along the way approving a couple of fraudulent vendors and getting caught up in Willie Brown’s sleaze. It discusses how his campaign is taking credit for other people’s work and ideas. It describes how he promised over an over not to run, then went ahead and did it anyway. It’s got a great picture of him steering a 139-foot yacht with the caption “I’m on a boat.”

(Nice link there, Tim Redmond – I hadn’t made the connection.)

All the deets:

“The Untold, Untold Story” Goes Online - Leland Yee campaign can’t print “The Real Ed Lee” book fast enough for demand

SAN FRANCISCO – The reviews are in and the “The Real Ed Lee: The Untold, Untold Story” is a smash hit!

Has a serious political point, but it’s actually funny, sometimes really funny, and it’s much easier to read than the plodding “Ed-Is-Greater-Than-God” prose of the original…. For once, we have a campaign piece that made me laugh instead of crying. - San Francisco Bay Guardian

OMG, A new best seller to be! – Some guy on the internet

Everyone is talking about it! – SFist

The 55-page parody shows Lee on the cover as downcast, grumpy and triple-chinned. The book recounts dozens of previously published stories detailing everything from the two district attorney investigations into alleged ethics violations by his supporters and alleged cronyism. – San Francisco Chronicle

The 56-page booklet is heavily footnoted with URLs – The Bay Citizen

I totally LOL’ed – The San Francisco Citizen

((*sound of crickets*)) – Interim Mayor Ed Lee

The slim volume oozes sarcasm as it covers the history of Ed Lee’s tenure as mayor, including his promise to not run for a full term and charges of inappropriate campaign donations from contractors. - San Francisco Examiner

This is the first “hit” recipe in political history. - Eric Jaye

Less than three-months hence, Lee’s campaign is beset by multiple criminal investigations into alleged campaign money laundering, ballot tampering and other campaign election violations. – Fog City Journal

[Ed Lee staff] were pretty disgusted by it. – Tony Winnicker

Painstakingly put together to resemble the original propaganda mailer to the smallest detail. The type fonts are identical. The jaunty writing style is mocked all too well. – SF Weekly

The Leland Yee for Mayor campaign has already distributed thousands of “The Real Ed Lee: The Untold, Untold Story” to voters throughout San Francisco, however, the demand for the book has been so great that today Yee’s campaign launched the book online at http://www.lelandyee.com/the-untold-untold-story.

“We can’t print the books fast enough,” said Jim Stearns, Yee’s campaign manager. “Now that it is online every San Franciscan will have the opportunity to read this accurate account of our interim mayor and be able to compare his tarnished and corruption-filled record to Leland Yee’s 23 years of leadership and experience fighting for our community, especially seniors, students, and the most vulnerable.”

“The Real Ed Lee: The Untold, Untold Story” is a response to a book produced by one Ed Lee’s billionaire IE committees, which falsely glorified the interim mayor and ignored the multiple scandals and ethics violations of his campaign. The highlights of “The Real Ed Lee: The Untold, Untold Story” include Lee becoming interim mayor on false pretenses, his approval of fraudulent contracts, giving “golden parachutes, embracing cronyism, failure to follow ethics laws, illegal campaign contributions, money laundering (well, the first time), voter fraud, and the city’s future if Ed Lee were elected. The book also includes “Willie [Brown] & Rose’s [Pak] ‘No Longer Secret’ Make-A-Mayor Recipe.”

By comparison, Leland Yee has released several detailed plans on job creation, environmental protection, transportation, and schools. Maybe the most important of his plans – “An Independent City Hall” – would clean up City Hall, bring real transparency and accountability, kick out the powerbrokers, and return our local government to the people. To read Yee’s plan, visit http://www.lelandyee.com/issues/plan-for-an-independent-city-hall/.

Website Name Confusion? “The East Bay Citizen” vs. BANP’s Nascent “The Bay Citizen”

Thursday, April 15th, 2010

Back in the day, back around 1855-1865, the bay area had an actual physical newspaper called the “Daily Citizen” or “San Francisco Daily Citizen” or something. Didn’t last too long.

But these days, the fairly common name Citizen  (it made this list, anyway) is back in bidness in the bay area. Check it – here’s the East Bay Citizen.

See? There’s your straight-up prototypical Citizen Journalism right there, with extensive coverage of sujets civiques in San Leandro and Hayward from highly regarded Steven Tavares. Dude’s even got a manifesto ‘n stuff:

The purpose of The Citizen is to serve the areas of the East Bay that are severely under reported by the local media. The reasons your daily newspaper is sparse devoid of insight or context is either because of financial constraints leading to cutbacks in the newsroom or general dereliction of civic duty (that is the polite way of saying it).”

All right, fair enough.

Comes now the Bay Area  News Project (BANP). See?  It’s backed by more millionaires and billionaires than you can shake a stick at.  Well, next month, they’re going to start up with The Bay Citizen. Here’s their logo:

Question Time. Do you think that there might be confusion between these two outfits, owing to the similarity of the names? I do. Can you imagine how future developments could create even more confusion? Mmmm…

Do you think the person(s) who came up with the name Bay Citizen for the BANP are aware of the online existence of the East Bay Citizen? Yes, of course, how could they not be?

Now, do you think the person(s) who came up with the name Bay Citizen for the BANP bounced the idea off of Steven Tavares beforehand? No, that’s a negatory, good buddy.

And do you think hardworking Steven Tavares is pleased with BANP’s actions? No. (Not saying he’s all pissed off or anything, as he’s manifestly Too Busy To Hate, just saying he’s not pleased.)

All right, Question Time is over. Now, it’s Party Time. Check it:

The Bay Citizen Just got the green light – our launch party will be held at the historic Great American Music Hall in San Francisco on May 26th. It’s a wonderful venue for what we promise will be an amazing party!”

So, for $50 you can score two tickets and then be able to tell all your friends that you’re a “Founder” of the BANP’s Bay Citizen online venture

Party on, I s’pose.

Bay Area News Project to Go Live May 26th, 2010 – Become a Founder for Just $50

Tuesday, March 30th, 2010

That Bay Area News Project / The Bay Citizen, it looks like they’re opening for bidness with a quickness. And they want your money too – actually, you might find donating a few bucks of seed money rewarding. Take a look.

Here’s the pitch I got today:

“Dear LADIESMAN217,
 
“I know that you’re passionate about local journalism, because you’ve signed up for our newsletter.  Now, you have the chance to do something positive for Bay Area news.  Help us create a vital institution for the Bay Area – become a Founder of The Bay Citizen.
 
“The state of news in the Bay Area is at an all-time low.  Half of the professional journalists covering the Bay Area are gone.  Original reporting about education, public policy, government, science and health, art, and other important civic topics has been hit the hardest.  What important stories are we missing?”

Now hold on, is the state of news in the Bay Area really at an “all-time low?” Really?

I’ll tell you, one of the specific examples cited by BANP Founder (the real Founder, not a run-of-the-mill-$50-donation founder) F. Warren Hellman to show the need for non-profit journalism in the bay area was the category of ballet reviews. Now, I just finished coding the HTML for a brace of reviews for the latest ballet performance in town – check it out here. Do you think this incomplete list is too short? Do you think the quality of writing from all those writers just isn’t there? Mmmmm.

Cheer up newsie, you’ll be repurposed and back in action in a couple months:

Anyway, look forward to the BANP owning the field of arts review soon. I don’t know, maybe ballet reviews in newspapers were somehow better back in the day?

Of course that’s a pretty specific nitpick, I’ll agree. But what about a century ago when Bill Hearst got people all fired up about something based on a bunch of lies ’n stuff? Wasn’t that par for the course back then? I’m thinking things are not at an all time low, myself. Oh well.

You can read the rest of that pitch letter after the jump. Be sure to take note of all the perks of Founderdom:

“As a Founder, you will receive:
Free admission to our launch party for you and a guest.  We’re planning to have the event in San Francisco, and we promise an entertaining evening.
Permanent recognition as a Founder on a special page of our Web site which we will unveil when our site goes live.
An invitiation to help shape The Bay Citizen by participating in our surveys and focus groups.
And of course, the satisfaction of knowing that you are helping to make history by supporting the future of Bay Area journalism.
Founders who donate over $1,000 will also receive an invitation to a small-group lunch with myself and Jonathan Weber, our Editor in Chief.
 

(Tell you what, you give this Citizen $50 and I’ll take you out to Chow, no problem. Now, you might not be able to deduct that from your taxes…)

As promised, the rest of the pitch, after the jump. Maybe you’ll think this offer a good deal.

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BANP Update: San Francisco’s Newest Big Media Outlet is Called The Bay Citizen

Tuesday, March 23rd, 2010

San Francisco’s Bay Area News Project has a new name – it’s now called The Bay Citizen.*

But they’ve still not started yet. Where will BANP rank on the list of world’s longest gestation periods? Somewhere betwixt llama and African elelphant, I’ll bet. Stay tuned.

Oh, here’s some news:

“Renowned Investigative Journalist Steve Fainaru Joins The Bay Citizen

Bon Courage, Steve Fainaru.

*That’s kind of close to San Francisco Citizen**, eh? I Better Call Saul.*** Let’s hope they steer of this blog’s core coverage area of cheerleaders, beauty queens and nude Bay to Breakers participants.

**This name was the only alliterative (starting with an “S” as in Sentinel or a soft “C”) old-school 19th-century San Francisco newspaper name available, so that’s why it got picked.

***One of this blog’s half-dozen readers has already weighed in with this bon mot:

“Just saw the Bay Area News Project renamed themselves to Bay Area Citizen. Boooooooooo!”

California NUMMI Commission Offers Toyota No Carrots and No Sticks

Tuesday, March 9th, 2010

Here’s the thing about that NUMMI plant in Fremont that’s closing down at the end of the month – Toyota thought about making Prius hybrid electric cars there after the departure of General Motors, but then rejected that idea. So, Corolla production will  be taken care of by an existing plant in Ontario, Canada and pickup trucks, too, will be made somewhere else if necessary. This all got worked out last summer.  

(Here’s Toyota’s current take on the situation from NUMMI spinmeister Lance Tomasu for the record. Enjoy.)

Anyway right now, California’s Toyota NUMMI Commission is coming back from Japan after trying to nag Toyota brass into keeping the Fremont factory going. Take a look at their report. The Question of the Day is why Toyota should remain the only car manufacturer in the entire western United States.

So you’d think that California would offer some carrots and/or wave some sticks around at Toyota but the Commission’s not really equipped to do that all that much.

It’s not like they can’t find some carrots or sticks in their quiver, it’s that their quiver is pretty much empty.

According to the commission, the chance for Toyota to build hybrid electric Corollas in Fremont is somehow some big benefit to Toyota that Toyota is oblivious to. That’s not really a carrot, actually, and you’d think that Toyota would have their own ideas about making cars. Would consumers want to buy a “California Corolla” just because it’s made in Fremont? I don’t think so. Very possibly, Toyota having a big pickem-up factory in Texas helps sell big V8 pickem-ups, but the average Californian would prefer a Made In Japan label, it would seem.   

Another carrot the commission could dangle would be the synergy from making cars in the same state as tiny, troubled Tesla Motors. That’s not really a carrot either, huh?

Well, how about some sticks instead? What will happen to Toyota if it shuts down its money-losing plant in Fremont? Nothing, it would seem. One might suppose that quiet diplomacy would have been used on Toyota last year, to no avail.

Back in the day, down in Fremont:

   

via CanadaGood

Now, let’s read up on the news of the past weekend. Has Toyota really ”lost its way?” No. Let’s see here, did Toyota make a mistake with how it handled the floor mat / plastic gas pedal parts / ?????? / issues? Yes, but that’s just a hiccup in the sands of time.

Is Toyota’s decision to discontinue production in California without GM as a partner “suicidal?” No. 

And is the success of the Prius model due to “enthusiastic Californians” or is it due to Toyota spending billions to develop the technology and then selling them at a loss for years and years? You Make The Call.  

And are the people of Mississippi looking forward to making hybrid vehicles for Toyota in a brand-new factory that’s going unused right now? Yes. Toyota decided last year to make Priuseses in Blue Springs, Mississippi instead of California. That’s California’s loss, no argument about that.

All right, here’s entire conclusion of the Blue Ribbon Commission’s report, in bold.

“The collaborative efforts of Californians, which have bolstered NUMMI’s success, are ongoing.”

Was NUMMI a success, really? Didn’t it lose money every year for the past quarter century? Yes.

“A ‘Red Team’ of state, local government, private sector and other officials have proposed significant tax and business incentives to retain the plant.”

Presumably, Toyota knows about this, but is not interested.

 ”Closing NUMMI now is a decision of choice, not necessity.”

This is true. If Toyota were really afraid of the consequences of closing down NUMMI then maybe they’d run it at a loss, if necessary, forever.

“Closure abandons a loyal, highly-skilled workforce and places a heavy burden on communities and the state when they can least afford it. The decision is inconsistent with the values that have led Toyota to unparalleled economic success. It elevates narrow, short-term corporate interests above the interests of workers, the public and the long-term interests of Toyota itself.

Don’t really get this. Why should Toyota have a plant in California instead of some other state or nearby country?  

 “Looking at the pending NUMMI plant shutdown, and then you look at larger problems that Toyota is having in America” Richard Holober, from the Consumer Federation of California, told the NUMMI Blue Ribbon Commission.

Well, Toyota’s “having problems in America” primarily due to a decision to save a few pennies by using a plastic-on-plastic device to make holding your foot on the gas pedal a bit easier AND not reacting quickly enough to incident reports. This issue will get solved.

“I can’t help but conclude that this is not an isolated plant closure decision, but a symptom of a much, much deeper problem with what has happened to Toyota as a corporation.”

What has “happened to Toyota as a corporation” is that it’s become the best car company in the world. This was true last year, it’s true this year, it’ll be true next year.

“Akio Toyoda, the Toyota president whose grandfather founded the automaker in 1937, admitted at a February 24 Congressional hearing, “recently we haven’t lived up to the standards you’ve come to expect from us or that we expect from ourselves.” He also stated that one of the automaker’s great strengths was facing its mistakes and addressing them. The decision to close NUMMI reflects the period when the automaker pursued a hyper-expansion and abandoned its values in the interest of narrow, short-term financial goals.

“Hyper-expansion” = Making Popular Cars. “Narrow, short-term financial goals” = GM. Now, Toyota changed a bit after getting listed on the stock exchange in New Yawk, and Toyota has more hide-bound corporate culture than it probably needs but it’s doing all right overall.

“Toyota, however, has risen to outstanding heights by building its success precisely on strong core values. These included: 1) building only the highest quality vehicles; 2) customer safety first; 3) lifetime job security for its workers; 4) caring partnerships with communities; 5) concern for the environment. A very visible first step toward returning to this successful corporate ethic would be to keep NUMMI open, and show California and the world that the company has reached into its heritage to define its future.

I don’t know, Toyota participated in NUMMI during a time when there was a threat of massive tariffs being applied to cars imported from Japan. The 1981-1994 Voluntary Export Restraint plan of that era was a disaster for American consumers (and, speaking of “narrow, short-term financial goals,” the long-term health of the American automobile industry.) Something like the threat of massive tariffs on Toyota products would be a nice stick for the NUMMI Commission to wave about, but, for whatever reason, Toyota doesn’t seemed to be all that worried about that issue. 

“This is the moment for political leaders in Washington and Sacramento to address the closure. Millions of Californians are hurting in the worst job market in seven decades and are deeply apprehensive about the future. The most immediate, direct, and cost effective jobs program available is to keep NUMMI running.

There’s no question that keeping NUMMI running would benefit California. The question is why Toyota should lose money to finance an American stimulus plan?

“This stimulus plan delivers 25,000 jobs and could save $2.3 billion. The automaker and California would reap a triple bottom-line benefit: Toyota would restore its image and retain a world-class plant; workers and their families would make it through a dark economic winter; and California would get further down the road to economic growth and a green future.

O.K., the Blue Ribbon Commission is traveling home from Nagoya, Japan now.

Perhaps the their trip to Toyota City will prove useful even if the NUMMI factory shuts down on sked this month.

We’ll just have to wait and see what the Commission got.

State Treasurer Bill Lockyer Realistic About NUMMI Commission, Report Due March 3rd

Thursday, February 25th, 2010

Our State Treasurer certainly seems realistic about the chances of getting Toyota to take over the Toyota/GM NUMMI plant in Fremont, CA, so that’s a good thing. Bill just wants to do all that he can before giving up.

Bill Lockyer introducing commission members at the initial meeting in the CPUC Building on Van Ness yesterday:

Click to expand

Here are some new deets, below. Let’s wait and see what they come up with…

“Toyota’s Proposed Plant Shutdown to Be Scrutinized by Panel of California Leaders

Blue Ribbon Commission holds public hearing, will issue findings next Wednesday on economic, social, environmental costs of automaker’s proposal to close award-winning NUMMI plant in Fremont

SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. 24 — A 10-member panel of California leaders convened by State Treasurer Bill Lockyer held a public hearing in San Francisco today to gather facts and take testimony from a broad range of experts on the expected impact of Toyota’s planned shutdown of New United Motor Manufacturing, Inc. – or NUMMI – auto plant in Fremont. The plant has consistently won top ratings from J.D. Powers and is widely regarded as a model for the auto industry.

A shutdown of NUMMI would be the largest mass layoff in the current recession, and the prospect of having to endure the loss of potentially tens of thousands more jobs in the plant itself and related industries has spurred broad concern throughout the state. The Blue Ribbon Commission has been charged with both collecting the facts on the impact of closing NUMMI and examining alternatives for keeping the plant in operation.

Lockyer explained, “Californians are deeply concerned about how the loss of this plant might affect their economy, their state and their lives, and it is the job of this Commission to help find the answers to those questions. It is a testament to the quality of leaders on this panel that they have been more than willing to take up this challenge. I have asked the panel, and they have agreed, to gather and assess the facts and to have a report on my desk by next Wednesday morning so that I can share it with the public at noon.”

Acclaimed actor Danny Glover, who serves on the Commission, echoed those sentiments when he said, “California leaders – religious, civic, labor, and business – have come together on this Commission to determine for ourselves if the closing of Toyota’s California plant is necessary, to assess the severity of the impact that would follow such a closing, and, if possible, to explore strategies that might make it possible to avoid a shutdown. It is an honor to have been asked to serve my state in this serious and important matter.”

Some economic experts have projected that Toyota’s impending NUMMI shutdown could cost the state – already one of the hardest-hit by unemployment during this recession – as many as 50,000 more jobs. That figure includes the more than 5,000 now employed at the plant itself and an estimated 50,000 more in related industries up and down the state. In anticipation of the closure, some companies that supply the plant with parts and material have already announced layoff plans.

Concerns about the impact of the shutdown do not end with its economic consequences, however. The membership of the Commission reflects the breadth of issues that have fueled the growing alarm over Toyota’s plan to abandon auto manufacturing in California. The members of the Commission are:

 –  Professor Harley Shaiken, UC Berkeley
 –  Bob Wasserman, Mayor of Fremont
 –  Rev. Bruce Reyes-Chow, Presbyterian Church USA
 –  Victor Uno, Chairman, Port of Oakland
 –  Richard Holober, Executive Director, Consumer Federation of California
 –  Bruce Kern, Executive Director, East Bay Economic Development Alliance
 –  Carl Pope, President, Sierra Club
 –  Nina Moore, Fremont Chamber of Commerce
 –  Art Pulaski, Chief Officer, California Labor Federation
 –  Danny Glover, Actor.

 
Another Commission member, the Rev. Bruce Reyes-Chow, who is the head of the Presbyterian Church USA and of a San Francisco Bay area congregation, said, “This Commission has a moral duty to serve our community and state to sort out the facts, to assess the implications of those facts, and to search for solutions that will best serve the needs of Californians and their families.”

Source: California Labor Federation”

Danny Glover’s Going to Travel to Toyota City, Japan to Keep Our NUMMI Plant Open?

Tuesday, February 23rd, 2010

Let’s see here, California Treasurer Bill Lockyer juststarted a commission to keep Fremont’s NUMMI auto plant running past April, 2010? This commission, meeting for the first time tomorrow in San Francisco, will soon be going on the road, it appears:

“The treasurer’s office said commission members will go to Japan and report directly to Toyota officials.”

Ready or not, Toyota, here we come.*   

A NUMMI representative parading on the Streets of San Francisco, during happier times a few years back:

The commission members:

UC Berkeley professor Harley Shaiken (chairman)
Fremont Mayor Bob Wasserman
Presbyterian Church USA’s Rev. Bruce Reyes-Chow
Port of Oakland Commission Chairman Victor Uno
Fremont Chamber of Commerce member Nina Moore
Consumer Federation of California Executive Director Richard Holober
East Bay Economic Development Alliance Executive Director Bruce Kern
Sierra Club of America President Carl Pope
Art Pulaski, Chief Officer, California Federation of Labor
Danny Glover, Actor

Look forward to reading Mr. Danny Glover’s Twitteringabout going 200 per on the Tokaido Shinkansen bullet train when he’s on his way to Nagoya.

Does it make sense to build cars in the bay area anymore?** Would the bay area buy the products of the NUMMI plant in the future? We’ll see.

*Down with the landing gear/ up goes the useless prayer.

**The shut-down dealership in Oakland that the Chron’s op-ed fretted about, that deal had more to do with the health of Nissan than Toyota, actually. Anyway, the place just got reopened – called One Toyota of Oakland it is.  

Tibet Protest on Golden Gate Bridge – High Rez Photo.

Monday, April 7th, 2008

Read all about today’s protest at KPIX / CBS 5 (along with Eye on Blogs from Brittney Gilbert). Are there really two women in this photo, as alleged here? [Update: No, just one, that makes more sense.] See the mise-en-scene from a good angle here.

Local updates as they happen on the -ist network’s San Francisco website. Up-and-coming San Francisco Supervisor Chris Daly has a few thoughts about these Olympics. And sexy train rider Elaine Santore writes in her CrackBerry Chronicles that she is bracing for Wednesday, when the Olympic Torch makes it only visit to North America. It looks like it’s going to be a humdinger of a day.

Beijing, Are You Ready for this? It’s hard to say. Word on the street today is that the planned route for the relay is now history. 

Finally,  check out hard working Frederic Larson as he once again provides great photos to the San Francisco Chronicle.

The protest people look down as some bridge workers come up:
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This dude’s on his cell phone:
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Things looked a little shaky at first, before the banners and flags were unfurled:
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Helmet-cam? Sure, why not.
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See higher resolution photos after the jump!

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It’s Mayday Maday Mayday for Maybach Manufaktur

Monday, March 17th, 2008

Or is it Maiday Maiday Maiday?

They warned us, but we didn’t listen. News comes today that luxury car nameplate Maybach soon might be ready to call it quits. Hurry on over and get your order in today, before they’re all gone. (Turn on their home page symphony, nice music). Nice video too.

Or you can just settle for a regular Mercedes. Your choice.

maybachlandaulet_hi004a.jpg

http://www.autoblog.com/photos/maybach-landaulet/470160/