Posts Tagged ‘san francisco general hospital’

Oh Hell Yes: UCSF Allows Emergency Room Check-In Online – Wait Just 15 Minutes with InQuickER Service at Parnassus

Tuesday, July 26th, 2011

The average wait for an emergency room visit at UCSF‘s Parnassus Heights campus is 4.5 hours for people with mild medical emergencies? Wow.

Wouldn’t it be nicer to pay $5 to check-in online and then wait at home rather than in the ER?

That’s what UCSF thinks.

Check it:

“UCSF patients with minor medical needs seeking treatment in the Emergency Department now can make an appointment to be seen – waiting at home rather in the hospital – via a new online check-in service called InQuickER.

UCSF Medical Center
UCSF Medical Center is now offering patients with mild medical emergencies a chance to reserve a time to be seen in the Emergency Department using a new online system.

UCSF Medical Center’s Emergency Department (ED) at Parnassus Heights is now offering InQuickER designed for patients with non-threatening minor medical needs.

UCSF patients can register online for a $4.99 fee and pick an open slot for an emergency room visit. The fee will be refunded if they’re not seen within 15 minutes.

In April, UCSF did a trial run with the online service, which 22 people used. UCSF Medical Center launched the system a few weeks ago.

“One thing we encountered during the trial was that a lot of patients were using it inappropriately,” said Jennifer Dearman, the Emergency Department’s patient care manager. “The online registration is screened by ED nurses and we have had to advise some patients to come directly to the ED. This service is for a fast-track kind of patient.”

“For example, a cancer patient on chemotherapy with a fever can have complicated issues and should be seen in the regular ED, so InQuickER is not appropriate for that person.”

Waiting at Home vs. Hospital

About 105 patients a day visit the emergency room at UCSF Medical Center on the Parnassus campus, Dearman said, and the average time between arrival and departure, for those not admitted to the hospital, is four-and-a-half hours.

That’s in keeping with the average wait in 2009 for ER patients throughout California: four hours and 34 minutes –  27 minutes longer than the U.S. average, according to a 2010 report by health care consulting firm Press Ganey.

Dearman said patient satisfaction was the main reason UCSF Medical Center adopted InQuickER. “It also helps us control the flow,” she said. “The general population doesn’t think the emergency room ever has slow times. But it does.”

UCSF is one of 55 health care facilities in 13 states partnering with InQuickER, said spokesman Chris Song. The service, based in Nashville, began in 2006 after its founder, Tyler Kiley, had to go to an emergency room and spent hours witnessing stasis and frustration.

“He just thought there had to be a better way,” Song said. “With our service, you still have to wait but you get to do it somewhere else. Like on your couch instead of being surrounded by other sick people.”

Song said InQuickerER provides patients with convenience, comfort and some level of control. And it allows emergency department staff to know who’s coming and what symptoms they have, so that they can better prepare.

“It can help reduce the burden of peak times and spread it out,” Song said. “It creates more efficiency and a better environment in the waiting room.”

So far, more than 10,000 people have used the service; 95 percent have been seen within the 15-minute window. In a triage situation, of course, even people who have registered will have to wait. When there are delays, users are notified through text messages and emails with updated projections on treatment times.

The service is available online at https://ucsfmedicalcenter.inquicker.com/. It is growing rapidly, Song said, which is not surprising: A study led by San Francisco General Hospital emergency physician Renee Hsia, MD, MSc, found that the number of hospital-based emergency departments in the United States is declining, despite an increase in the number of patients seeking emergency care.

The study by Hsia, an assistant professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine in the UCSF School of Medicine, was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in May. It reported that 27 percent of urban and suburban emergency rooms have closed in the last two decades.”

Hurray!

Potero Hill NIMBYs Kill SFGH Medical Helipad Without Firing a Shot

Friday, April 9th, 2010

Heather Smith of Mission Local has the update (renderporn included) on the massive San Francisco General Hospital project.

Looks like you can just forget about a helipad for now:

First, rumors need to be dispelled: ‘I just want to settle one thing right now,” says Jeff Critchfield, Chief of Staff. “Will this project include a helipad? There is no plan for a helipad. I’ve heard it mentioned a few times this evening. There was a prior application for a permit. It expired. There is no plan for a helipad.”

“Another hand goes up. ‘Does No helipad mean “No applying for a helipad permit in the future?”

The helipad is not part of project,” says SFGH CEO Susan Currin.

So, there you have it.

The NIMBYs’ goal of trying to kill accident victims has been attained, and there are no signs of any changes on the horizon.  

Here’s their Plan B – giant soldiers with General Dynamics FIM-43 Redeye missiles:

Make no mistake, these NIMBYs are trying to kill you. Maybe they’ll succeed, when your luck runs out…

Take your pick StopHelipad.org or StopHelipad.com - there are plenty of lies in both.

It’s your choice as to which selfish group’s website has the greater number of false statements.

Oh well.

“They’re trying to kill me,” Yossarian told him calmly.

“No one’s trying to kill you,” Clevinger cried.

“Then why are they stopping the helipad?” Yossarian asked.

“They’re stopping the helipad for everyone,” Clevinger answered. “They’re trying to kill everybody.”

“What difference does that make?”

The Rich NIMBYs of “Neighbors of SFGH” have a Grand Party on Potrero Hill

Monday, November 16th, 2009

If you can tell the difference between the helipad-hating “Neighbors of SFGH” vs. the Stop the Helipad haters, well, then you’re one up on me. What they are, they’re a bunch of NIMBYs on a hill who don’t care how many people have died, and how many more will die, due to the lack of a helipad at San Francisco General Hospital. Anyway…

These hill-folk richers just had a party to raise money for their fight. [Oh, man, I've just discovered that writer Sajid Farooq yesterday posted "$100 Dinner Could Ground Pesky Lifesaving Helicopters*" over at NBC Bay Area, saving me the trouble of crafting a more complete post. Thanks, MSM! Click on over there for the deets.]

An artist’s conception of the “Neighbors” of San Francisco General Hospital having their high-rent lifestyles impinged upon by EMS flights buzzing about:

687qc3 copy

Lovey and Winston are not happy. 

Read on to see the fruits of the labors of the Stop the Helipad people:

A head-on collision on the Golden Gate Bridge in May threw the evening commute into chaos and drew immediate cries for new safety measures. Lost in the flurry of traffic reports and debate about possible barriers, however, was the aftermath of the crash for the most seriously hurt victim. Dr. Grace M. Dammann had to be transported by helicopter about 25 miles to John Muir Hospital in Walnut Creek because San Francisco General Hospital lacks a helipad for its acclaimed Level 1 Trauma Center.”

Mmmm. According to an American College of Surgeons Consultation Survey of San Francisco General Hospital’s Trauma Program:

The lack of a helipad and helicopter service is a major deficiency in providing optimal trauma care for San Francisco General Hospital and San Francisco. It is difficult to understand why a city the size of San Francisco does not have any medical air transport. The congested roads and bridges with the surrounding water make helicopter service an essential medical support service.”

Oh well, here’s another artist’s conception of what the next Neighbors of SFGH fun-raiser might look like, maybe down by the chopper-free Warm Water Cove off of 24th. I think Gilligan is the webmaster:

09-06_Gilligan copy

(Note Mary Ann in pigtails and high heels, you don’t see that look much these days.)

Obviously, NIMBYs are people too, and their concerns should be amplified and paid ‘tention to. But they go to far when they tell doctors how to save lives. We’re getting a pad at UCSF Mission Bay and we’ll, eventually, get another pad at the new and improved, earthquake-safe SFGH.

How many will die unecessarily until then?  

*”Pesky Lifesaving Helicopters” – Pwned! I’m still laughing.

A San Francisco General Hospital Helipad Promise Made, Then Broken

Wednesday, October 15th, 2008

So you’re doing a good deed in the Mission District of San Francisco, and then when you come back to your very-well-made, made-in-China ride, you see that somebody has taped a handbill to your bike. Then you see it says:

“HELICOPTERS COULD SOON BE FLYING OVER OR NEAR YOUR HOME AT ALL HOURS OF BOTH DAY AND NIGHT!”

And then you think, wow, somebody has finally bought off all those NOT IN MY BACK YARD Nimby people who were standing in the way of Progress, and San Francisco will no longer have the only Level One Trauma Center in the country to lack a helipad or access to a heliport.

Click to expand

But then you read on and see that the handbill is from the Nimby’s themselves. Disappointed. They think a helipad is a bad idea for them.

Read on to see the fruits of the labors of the Stop the Helipad people:

A head-on collision on the Golden Gate Bridge in Maythrew the evening commute into chaos and drew immediate cries for new safety measures. Lost in the flurry of traffic reports and debate about possible barriers, however, was the aftermath of the crash for the most seriously hurt victim. Dr. Grace M. Dammann had to be transported by helicopter about 25 miles to John Muir Hospital in Walnut Creek because San Francisco General Hospital lacks a helipad for its acclaimed Level 1 Trauma Center.”

Mmmm. According to an American College of Surgeons Consultation Survey of San Francisco General Hospital’s Trauma Program:

The lack of a helipad and helicopter service is a major deficiency in providing optimal trauma care for San Francisco General Hospital and San Francisco. It is difficult to understand why a city the size of San Francisco does not have any medical air transport. The congested roads and bridges with the surrounding water make helicopter service an essential medical support service.”

Will the YES HELIPAD people win this one?

Eventually…