Posts Tagged ‘San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency’

Phil Ting’s MUNI Town Hall Meetings Continue: L Taraval, 30 Stockton, K Ingleside, 5 Fulton, M Ocean, 1 California

Saturday, October 1st, 2011

This is what today’s N Judah meeting, brought to you by Phil Ting and Reset San Francisco, looked like.

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Get all the deets on these Town Halls right here.

These are the upcoming events:

L Taraval
Tuesday, October 4, 5:30pm
Taraval Police Station, 2345 24th Ave.

30 Stockton
Saturday, October 8, 2:30pm
Bin 38, 3232 Scott St.

K Ingleside
Thursday, October 13, 6:30pm
Ingleside Police Station, 1 Sgt. John V Young Ln.

5 Fulton
Saturday, October 15, 10:30am
Richmond Police Station, 461 6th Ave.

M Ocean View
Thursday, October 20, 7pm
West Portal Playground, 131 Lenox Way

1 California
Saturday, October 22, 2:30pm
San Francisco Public Library (Richmond), 351 9th Ave.

Mayoral Candidate and Reset San Francisco Founder Phil Ting To Hold Muni Town Halls Starting Today

Thursday, September 29th, 2011

From today to October 22, 2011, City Assessor Phil Ting will hold eight Muni town halls.

All the deets, below:

Via Beck Justin

All the deets:

“Mayoral candidate, and Reset San Francisco Founder, Phil Ting will hold eight Muni town halls in four weeks to engage residents around the vital issue of making public transportation faster and more reliable.

“If the politicians and the policy makers could do it alone, Muni would already work. The people need to be engaged at every level to help find the best ideas and to hold the city accountable for change,” Ting said.

Ting’s first Muni Town Hall will be Thursday, September 29 at 6:30pm focused on improving the 38 Geary.

Ting will review the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency’s Transit Effectiveness Project (TEP) and discuss how to implement it faster.

“The Transit Effectiveness Project is a good start to reducing our travel times and making Muni work better. But all San Franciscans need to be part of this conversation,” Phil Ting said. “The City doesn’t have the resources or budget for extensive community outreach, so Reset San Francisco is taking the first steps to engage residents to get involved and to participate in the discussion.”

“We want to work with the City to engage San Franciscans on this important issue,” Ting said. “The TEP will take 5 more years to implement, and at Reset San Francisco, we think we can tap into the community to maybe help speed up this process.”

“If we speed up our buses and streetcars by just 1 minute, the SFMTA would save over $20 million a year. And those funds could be spent on ways to ensure that our world-class city has world-class public transportation.”

Last August, Phil Ting hosted a Muni town hall with the Reset San Francisco community and transportation experts Tim Papandreou, Joel Ramos and Greg Dewar. Nearly 300 San Franciscans came to share their ideas and their priorities for Muni with the panelists and each other.

Learn more about these Muni Town Halls at: http://bit.ly/resetsf-muni-events

Below is the list of scheduled Muni Town Halls this fall:

38 Geary
Thursday, September 29, 6:30pm
San Francisco Public Library (Richmond), 351 9th Ave.

N Judah
Saturday, October 1, 1:00pm
Villa Romana, 731 Irving St.

L Taraval
Tuesday, October 4, 5:30pm
Taraval Police Station, 2345 24th Ave.

30 Stockton
Saturday, October 8, 2:30pm
Bin 38, 3232 Scott St.

K Ingleside
Thursday, October 13, 6:30pm
Ingleside Police Station, 1 Sgt. John V Young Ln.

5 Fulton
Saturday, October 15, 10:30am
Richmond Police Station, 461 6th Ave.

M Ocean View
Thursday, October 20, 7pm
West Portal Playground, 131 Lenox Way

1 California
Saturday, October 22, 2:30pm
San Francisco Public Library (Richmond), 351 9th Ave.

ABOUT RESET SAN FRANCISCO: Reset San Francisco is an offline and online community founded by San Francisco Assessor-Recorder and candidate for mayor Phil Ting. The community has already united more than 10,000 San Franciscans and given them the tools to learn about policy, debate ideas and make their voices heard at City Hall. The ResetSanFrancisco.org community uses web-based Government 2.0 tools to help its members connect with government, and it also organizes in-person forums to connect San Franciscans to each other and to help the community unite around solutions.”

Corrupt Randy, Pugnacious Tony, and Taciturn Bill: City Family Shows at Leland Yee CCDC Presser

Monday, September 26th, 2011

Thank Gaia Wheezie gave me time off from the Help Center this week, else I would have missed the big Senator Leland Yee Central Subway press conference.

And look who was there. See ‘em?

1. Taciturn Bill Barnes - Ed Lee for Mayor Campaign Manager

2. Pugnacious Tony Winnicker – Ed Lee for Mayor Campaign Spokesperson (Boy, you give him your money and he won’t just sit around – he’ll hit the streets to fight for you.)

3. Corrupt Randy Shaw – Dictator for Life, Tenderloin

4. Others

I don’t know, if Ed Lee held a news conference about alleged corruption involving the San Francisco “City Family,” would a bunch of Leland Yee for Mayor managers show up to coach the media on what questions to ask (mind you, this is during the press conference) and also listen closely to every last syllable? Maybe. I kind of doubt it though.

Anyway, all the deets are below, but there’s no satisfying ending to this one – you’ll have to cool your heels to wait for the response from City Hall.

Senator Yee is giving The Powers That Be* ’til the end of the week to start turning over documents.

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“Yee calls for sunshine into waste, fraud and abuse at CCDC - Says without full disclosure, Central Subway project could be threatened

SAN FRANCISCO – Senator Leland Yee, along with several city residents, today called on interim mayor Ed Lee to make public the details of all contracts for the past five years between the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (MTA), city departments and Chinatown Community Development Center (CCDC) regarding the Central Subway.

Today, Yee also submit public records requests for all correspondence between the Mayor’s office or the City Administrator’s Office and CCDC or powerbroker Rose Pak.

Yee’s request comes after the San Francisco Chronicle unveiled several instances of waste, fraud and abuse by the nonprofit, including charging taxpayers $750 an hour to attend project meetings, $578 per visitor for outreach, and $25,000 to host a single community meeting.

By comparison, city contracts show payment to other entities for meeting attendance does not come close to what was received by CCDC. In fact, one contract for the city’s Arts Task Force showed a charge of 80 percent less, at $125/hour.

On the steps of City Hall and using a “golden” chair to represent the exorbitant cost the City paid for CCDC to attending meetings, Yee said, “As a strong supporter of the Central Subway, I am very concerned that possible malfeasance may jeopardize this important project. We need to get to the bottom of this immediately and the interim mayor needs to give the public the facts about these contracts.”

Yee said he expects Lee to provide the public documents regarding the Central Subway by the end of the week, at which time he will consider further action

This is not the first time Yee has fought to disclose public documents. Yee has become one of the State’s staunchest open government advocates, and last year, Yee made national headlines when he demanded the release of Sarah Palin’s speaking contract at California State University. Subsequently, students found parts of the contract along with shredded documents in the administration’s Dumpster, and Californians Aware successfully won a lawsuit against the University to fully disclose the contract.”

*Have you seen this one from Anonymous,** via writer John Cote, from deep inside the CCDC itself?

 

Wow.

**Somebody within the CCDC who doesn’t approve of its recent dealings, I’m forced to assume…

Best San Francisco Examiner Newspaper Cover Ever: “Art Money for a Dog Killer” Re: Central Subway Art

Friday, September 16th, 2011

There’s no reason for me to read the actual bit, AFAIAC, ’cause I already don’t like our troubled CentralSubwayBigDigSubwayToNowhere.

Click to expand

But as for you, enjoy.

Central T Subway: Connecting People, Connecting Communities, Giving Money to Dog Killers 

BTW, here are the policies for the ridiculous Central Subway blog, you know, in case it gets a reader or commenter some day.

“Central Subway is Phase 2 of the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency’s (SFMTA) Third Street Light Rail Project.  It will operate as an extension of the T Third line and will extend light rail service with a surface stop on 4th Street near Brannan Street, and subway service under the South of Market (SoMa), Union Square and Chinatown neighborhoods.  The Central Subway project is a critical transportation improvement linking neighborhoods in the southeastern part of San Francisco with the retail and employment centers downtown and in Chinatown, and it will provide much needed and improved transportation to an under-served portion of the City.

The Central Subway Blog is monitored and maintained by the project’s Outreach Team.

Comment Policy

The Central Subway Blog serves as a forum for open communication about San Francisco’s Central Subway project.  We welcome your comments and expect that our conversation will follow the general rules of respectful civil discourse – we expect this community to treat its members with respect.

Bloggers are fully responsible for everything they include in their comments, and all posted comments are in the public domain.  We do not discriminate against any views, but we reserve the right not to post comments.  The Central Subway Blog will remove any comments that include personal attacks, slurs, offensive language, or otherwise inappropriate content.

Thank you for visiting the Central Subway Blog!

Linking Policy and Disclaimer of Endorsement

The views expressed by official authors of the Central Subway Blog reflect the official opinion of the Central Subway project and SFMTA.  The views of public comments may not necessarily reflect those of Central Subway, SFMTA or the City of San Francisco.

The Central Subway Blog includes useful hypertext links to information created and maintained by other public and private organizations and individuals’ blogs.  The Central Subway and SFMTA share these links solely for the public’s information and convenience.

When you select a link to an outside Web site, you are leaving the Central Subway Blog and are subject to the privacy and security policies of the owners/sponsors of the outside Web site.

The Central Subway and SFMTA do not control or guarantee the accuracy, relevance, timeliness or completeness of information contained on a linked Web site.

The Central Subway and SFMTA do not endorse the organizations sponsoring linked Web sites, and we do not endorse the views they express or the products/services they offer.

The Central Subway and SFMTA cannot authorize the use of copyrighted materials contained in linked Web sites.  Users must request such authorization from the sponsor of the linked Web site. Those who provide comments are responsible for the copyright of the text they provide.

The Central Subway and SFMTA are not responsible for transmissions users receive from linked Web sites.

The Central Subway and SFMTA do not guarantee that outside Web sites comply with Section 508 (Accessibility Requirements) of the Rehabilitation Act.”

OMG, McAllister Street to Become a Two-Way August 4th – All the Way to Market for Bikes, MUNI, and Taxis

Monday, August 1st, 2011

Well, here you go – in four short days, McAllister will become a fully two-way street.

This should speed up the #5 Fulton inbound, huh?

And now there’s even less excuse to use the Wiggle bike route (as McAllister and Divisadero make up a superior route to and from the Panhandle, sorry for saying that over again but it’s totally true.)

The News of the Day: 

“The SFMTA Announces Reconfiguration of McAllister Street

The San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (SFMTA), which oversees all surface transportation in the City, including the Municipal Railway (Muni), today announced that, effective Thursday, Aug. 4, McAllister Street east of Hyde Street will be reconfigured. Also, Charles J. Brenham Place (7th Street north of Market) will be converted to two-way. The traffic reconfiguration and correlated completion of the overhead contact system (OCS) rehabilitation in this area mean that the nearly 16,000 annual 5 Fulton Muni trolley bus customers will now have a more direct trip downtown. The change will save the Agency more than $200,000 a year in operating expenses.

Effective Aug. 4, the new configuration will allow Muni, commercial vehicles and bicycles to travel eastbound on McAllister Street between Hyde Street and Charles J. Brenham Place. All other eastbound McAllister traffic will continue to turn right at Hyde Street. Only bicycles, taxis and Muni vehicles will be allowed to turn east on Market Street from McAllister Street. All other traffic will be required to turn right onto Market Street. All traffic will be able to make a right turn from northbound Charles J. Brenham Place (7th Street north of Market Street) onto eastbound McAllister Street to access the block between Charles J. Brenham Place and Jones Street. The attached maps show the changes in the traffic configuration.

The current 5 Fulton route requires inbound vehicles heading downtown to make a right on Hyde Street and then a left on Market Street. The new route, made possible by new overhead wires in the eastbound direction, will allow buses on this route to go straight to Market Street, saving up to three minutes per trip. The changes to the 5 Fulton route will take effect after the testing of the new OCS in August.

The SFMTA’s Capital Investment Program includes the rehabilitation of the aging trolley bus OCS in various parts of the City. This vital work includes replacing existing poles and overhead wires. Rehabilitation of the OCS improves safety and service reliability and helps keeps Muni in a state of good repair. The OCS construction began last summer and was part of the 21 Hayes Pole Replacement project.”

Hurray?

Hurray!

Meet Your San Francisco Bike Sharing Program – 500 Bicycles and 50 Stations Coming Next Year to FiDi, SoMA, Civic Center

Tuesday, July 26th, 2011

I guess they have the money now and they’re working on figuring out who’s going to run the thing.

Appears as if the SFMTA has given up on a giant Parisian Velib-style program with 5000 bikes strewn all over town – they’re starting small. Regardless, some of this free advice still applies.

The deets:

“…the pilot service area will be centered in San Francisco’s employment- and transit-rich Downtown/SOMA corridor between the Financial District, Market Street and the Transbay and Caltrain terminals.  This area is notably flat, has the densest bikeway network coverage in San Francisco and enjoys the highest levels of cycling, yet those who commute by transit from cities to the east and south encounter difficulties bringing a bicycle with them on BART or Caltrain.”

El Mapa:

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So the stations might end up looking a little half-assed, owing to CEQA:

“Heath Maddox, senior planner for the Livable Streets Subdivision of the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (SFMTA), says the defining characteristics of the service they’ve outlined in an RFP draft is that the bike system be solar-powered with no need for external AC power and no requirement for excavation that would turn the installation process into a construction project.”

Remember, sharing is caring.

All the deets:

“The map of the pilot service area presents northeast San Francisco. The highlighted area in the map is the bicycle sharing pilot service area bound by South Van Ness Avenue and the Ferry Terminal along Market Street. To the north, the service area boundary includes the Federal Building at Turk Street, Union Square at Post Street, the Broadway and Columbus Avenue intersection, and The Embarcadero at Sansome Street. To the south, the highlighted service area includes the Embarcadero to Mission Bay, Townsend Street and Concourse Exhibition Center.”

Bike Sharing

Bike sharing is coming to San Francisco! A regional pilot program led by the Bay Area Air Quality Management District (BAAQMD) in partnership with the SFMTA will bring approximately 50 bike share stations and 500 bikes to San Francisco’s downtown core beginning in spring 2012. The SFMTA is working with a regional team to implement this pilot along the Caltrain corridor in San Francisco, Mountain View, Palo Alto, Redwood City and San Jose and shown in this Regional Bike Sharing System map. The project is funded through a combination of local, regional and federal grants with major funding coming from the Metropolitan Transportation Commission’s Innovative Bay Area Climate Initiatives Grant Program (BACI).

What is bike sharing?

Similar to car sharing, bicycle sharing is a term used to describe a membership-based system of short-term bicycle rental.  Members can check a bicycle out from a network of automated bicycle stations, ride to their destination, and return the bicycle to a different station.  Bicycle sharing is enjoying a global explosion in growth with the development of purpose-built bicycles and stations that employ high tech features like smartcards, solar power, and wireless internet and GPS technologies.

Who is involved with launching the San Francisco bike sharing system?

The BAAQMD is the overall regional project lead, coordinating the planning and implementation efforts of the local partners: the City and County of San Francisco, the Cities of San Jose, Mountain View and Palo Alto in Santa Clara County and the City of Redwood City in San Mateo County. The SFMTA is leading the project in San Francisco, and we are working in cooperation with our City and County partners, including the Planning Department, Department of Public Works, San Francisco Recreation and Park Department and the Port of San Francisco. The regional partners will be selecting a contractor in fall 2011 to install, operate, and manage the system.

Where will bike sharing be located in San Francisco?

As the San Francisco Bicycle Sharing Pilot Service Area map (PDF) presents, in San Francisco, the pilot service area will be centered in San Francisco’s employment- and transit-rich Downtown/SOMA corridor between the Financial District, Market Street and the Transbay and Caltrain terminals.  This area is notably flat, has the densest bikeway network coverage in San Francisco and enjoys the highest levels of cycling, yet those who commute by transit from cities to the east and south encounter difficulties bringing a bicycle with them on BART or Caltrain. Much of San Francisco’s densely urbanized northeastern quadrant is similarly well-suited to bicycle sharing.

When will bike sharing launch in San Francisco?

The regional partners will be selecting a vendor to install, operate, and manage the bike sharing system in 2011 with the goal of a system launch in Spring/Summer 2012!

Further Information

If you have any questions, comments or feedback about bike sharing, contact the SFMTA at sustainable.streets@sfmta.com.

Our Crappy San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency Hosts Bike Sharing Demos in Civic Center Friday, Saturday

Friday, December 17th, 2010

Do you know what it’s like to ride a 50-pound plus bike in SF in the rain? I do, I remember from just yesterday. But you, you ought to hit Civic Center today and tomorrow to see all the models competing to become a part of your San Francisco Bike Share Program. Check it:

“Vendors who operate bike-share programs will make their equipment available for test rides in San Francisco on Friday and Saturday. The San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency is hosting the demonstration project at Civic Center Plaza on both days between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m.”

I’ve already given my pithy advice here, so all’s that’s left to do is remember the time the Canadians came to town to show off their rides.

Enjoy.

From back in the day in GGP. An old report:

IMG_7741 copy

The Bixi short-term bike-share roadshow blew into town to show us how they do it up in Montreal.

But first things first – a quick report on what our visiting bike-sharing visitors were surprised by in GGP:

1. The summertime cold and wind;

2. The homeless dude with a guitar case who flipped out, attacked a jogger, and had to get taken down by a bunch of Park Rangers and SFPD officers;

3. Noisy raptors circling low overhead; and

4. San Francisco’s famous bicycle built for four. It almost stole the show. See?

San Francisco Bicycle Coalition Program Director Andy Thornley with SF Weekly’s Matt Smith et ux, ”quad” liberi, all together on a charming, fully-functioning bicycle. Click to expand:

IMG_7752 copy

So Bixi is just like the Parisian Velib program except the Bixi bikes aren’t as heavy, which is a good thing. But the Bixis are still heavy though. And if you happen to be six foot one and a ton of fun, you’ll find that the frame is strong enough but that the seatpost doesn’t go up high enough. Otherwise the whole program is as you would expect.

In France, they incentivize people to drop the bikes off at the tops of hills. If a program like this ever gets off the ground in San Francisco, what would it take to deal with stations at the tops of our mini-mountains?

Bienvenue à Montréal!

IMG_7742 copy

It’s enormous work keeping a program like this going. The little monsters of France have effectively managed to steal, vandalize, and otherwise mangle the entire original fleet – at a replacement cost of thousands of dollars each, that’s a tough row to hoe.

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If you want to make a system like this work in San Francisco, you’d need  a subsidy from the government, the way that MUNI and BART and Golden Gate ferries get subsidies.

And where will people get the helmets they’ll need? Whoops. (In gay Paris, they take a c’est la vie approach to matters like this.)

All in all, I’d rather have a regular bike and a U-lock than a Bixi program membership. But if you can’t find a cab or you just missed your bus, you might like having the option of a short-term bike rental.

We’ll see.


City CarShare Cohosts Bike Sharing Demonstration.

Exploring New Trends in Green Mobility

WHAT: A one-day opportunity for the public to ride bikes from a bike share system. Bike sharing allows people to pick up a bike from one station, travel to their destination and return the bike to any other station in a network. City CarShare will be conducting a survey among participants to get their feedback on the concept, the equipment and their level of support for bike sharing in San Francisco.
WHEN: Sunday, August 2, 10 am- 3:30 pm
WHERE: Golden Gate Park, (just inside the car-free Sunday road closure on JFK Drive at Conservatory Drive East)
WHY: To allow the public to test-ride the bikes and learn more about this eco-friendly mode of urban transportation. Through this demonstration project, the sponsors hope to encourage awareness and increased civic conversation about Bike Sharing for San Francisco as having the potential to build a greener city while encouraging healthy living.
SPONSORS: City CarShare, SF Municipal Transportation Agency (SFMTA), BIXI (of Montreal)
COST Free

It Begins: San Francisco’s First Post-Injunction Bike Lane Goes In, As Scheduled

Monday, August 9th, 2010

See? Right on schedule:

Via loveletterstosf, click to expand.

The San Francisco Bicycle Coalition has all the deets and here’s what the Mayor had to say after his “self-congratulatory press conference,”  after the jump

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