Posts Tagged ‘sand’

Does This Look Like Berkeley to You? – The Charming Lake Anza Swimming Hole on a Dreaded Sunny Day

Monday, June 24th, 2013

As seen on Saturday by Amy Chen:

But watch for that e coli

Here’s What You Need: A $5000 Electric Bicycle Designed by a NASA Engineer – It’s Your Fortune Hanebrink All-Terrain Bike

Wednesday, July 27th, 2011

This is one of them “ice bikes” from Fortune Hanebrink.

Or something.

Use it to tow your sledge to the South Pole.

As seen in the Western Addition:

Click to expand

All the deets:

“Engineered and handcrafted 8000 ft above sea level in Big Bear Lake, California, HANEBRINK Electric All-Terrain vehicles are the confluence of ingenuity, ecology, and luxury. The capabilities of the HANEBRINK are as limitless as your own sense of adventure; as a commuter vehicle, it is smooth and dynamic.

Nearly 10 years ago, national champion cyclist, bicycle innovator, and NASA aerospace engineer, Dan Hanebrink was approached by an Arctic explorer looking for an alternative to skis that could take him and his equipment across the icy terrain of Antarctica. Hanebrink created a bicycle unlike anything ever built before. The original “Ice Bike” by HANEBRINK had no plastic parts and used superfat, low-pressure tires that devoured all surfaces in all conditions silently and effortlessly. Today, our drive to create innovative outdoor recreational vehicles continues and is reflected in our mission to satisfy and serve the adventurous worldwide.

The HANEBRINK Electric All-Terrain Vehicle is the evolution of the original, revolutionary HANEBRINK design, combining state-of-the art green technology with an on-demand hybrid electric system and the latest in bicycle technology. Crank the throttle and the 600 watt motor powers the HANEBRINK to speeds up to 20 mph. If you want to go faster, just start pedaling.

Three design features help the HANEBRINK achieve outstanding on and off-road performance.

• The widest tires in the industry. The 20 x 8 inch tires radically increase the surface area where rubber meets road for enhanced stability at all speeds, added traction on rough terrain, and unprecedented float on sand and snow.

• A mid-mounted, bracket supported motor optimizes the vehicle’s center of gravity beneath the rider and enables tight turns, rapid weight shifting, and provides more stability.

• 14 speed gearing tuned for a wide variety of surfaces, grades, and utility applications including a low range capable of carrying up to 300 pounds of bulky cargo up steep terrain or deep into inaccessible areas.

With a single Lithium ion battery (LiFePO4), the HANEBRINK has a one hour run time and three hour recharge. For longer excursions, the rear rack can be fitted with up to five lithium ion batteries, a run time of over 5 hours and more than 100 miles of riding. The wide rear rack is standard HANEBRINK equipment and can hold up to 100 pounds of cargo.

The HANEBRINK can truly go anywhere on the planet while maintaining minimal environmental impact and zero-carbon emissions. Where can you go with one?”

Hands Across the Sand / Slash Oil a Huge Success at Dreary Ocean Beach

Saturday, June 26th, 2010

This is what Hands Across the Sand looked like today over at less-foggy-than-expected Ocean Beach way out there in western San Francisco.

“Ocean Beach, San Francisco, CA – Ocean Beach across from the Beach Chalet, 1000 Great Highway Joining hands at noon. The Ocean beach event includes spelling out a large “Don’t Drill” using people to make the letters. It will photographed from the air. Be there by 10:30 for that.”

Yes, that’s media hound Frank Chu in there:

via DeniseNelson10, click to expand

We’ll just have to wait to see the photos from the air. (Did they use a petroleum-burning twirlypopper to take the photo, or maybe they used a kite? We’ll have to wait and see…)

[UPDATE: They used a twirlypopper, a Robinson actually, which is kind of a helicopter. A Republican one, ironically, from the Frank D. Robinson Helicopter company. Let's see here, Robinson's delivered something like 900 choppers so far and they've only had 262+(!) fatal accidents, per the Wiki. Wow. Also, it would be nice if this R44 model had inflatable floats for over-water operations, but oh well. A kite, and a DSLR (plus a surfboard, if necessary) also could have worked, by the way. I know it would have been less exciting...]

Ocean Beach Erosion Town Hall Meeting Tonight at the Great Highway’s Park Chalet

Monday, January 25th, 2010

Our neighbors in the Great Sand Waste* of the Outside Lands are having a little trouble with the partial collapse of the Great Highway near Sloat, so there’ll be a meeting tonight at 7:00 PM:

“A community meeting is being held on Monday, January 25th at 7:00 PM at the Park Chalet (located behind the Beach Chalet at 1000 Great Highway just south of Fulton in San Francisco) to discuss the proposed actions at Sloat Boulevard. The DPW Project Manager, Frank Filice will be there to discuss the emergency declaration, the short-term strategy, and a process for a long-term solution. Everyone who has an interest in the preservation and the future of Ocean Beach is encouraged to attend. The emergency declaration will go before the San Francisco Board of Supervisors for ratification the following day, Tuesday, January 26th.”

Will San Francisco “armor the beach or something? Stay tuned…

by k. riccitiello

If that doesn’t float your boat, there’s always, this:

“The Park Chalet will be offering $2 pints and extending their $5 happy hour menu of appetizers all night for the event.”

See you there.

*Look at this – snark from 160 years ago: The True Story of How San Francisco Received Its Name:

“San Francisco – this is a derivative word from sand and Francisco. In the early settlement of this country it was the custom of an old monk of the interior, by the name of Jeremiah Francisco, to perform a pilgrimage to this place every month, to visit the tomb of a brother of the order whose remains he had here interred. The wind “blew like mad” here, and upon his return he was usually so covered with the dust and sand, that his neighbors were unable to recognize him; hence they soon began to call him sand Francisco.

On one of his pilgrimages he happened, by mistake, to die here, and the place ever after was called by his name. From the difficulty of enunciating the d, it was usually called SAN FRANCISCO, and has so continued to this day. The present popular notion that the place was named after the St. Francis Hotel is an error!

California Weekly Courier
August 1, 1850″