Posts Tagged ‘scale’

Magnitude 4.0 Earthquake Struck UC Berkeley at 2:41 PM, October 20th 2011 – 3.8 Aftershock at 8:16 PM

Thursday, October 20th, 2011

[Or rather, make that a 4.0 on the Richter, final answer. That was for the afternoon earthquake. This evening's aftershock at 8:16 PM was a 3.8.]

People in the West Bay could definitely feel this this one today, the one centered beneath UC Berkeley.

It felt like a succession of sharp bumps for a few seconds and then there was some generalized shaking – perhaps it all lasted about six seconds.

The Did You Feel It Map:

The initial estimate was a 4.2:

Magnitude 4.2
Date-Time
  • Thursday, October 20, 2011 at 21:41:04 UTC
  • Thursday, October 20, 2011 at 02:41:04 PM at epicenter
Location 37.864°N, 122.249°W
Depth 9.8 km (6.1 miles)
Region SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA, CALIFORNIA
Distances
  • 2 km (2 miles) ESE (112°) from Berkeley, CA
  • 5 km (3 miles) NE (47°) from Emeryville, CA
  • 5 km (3 miles) NNW (341°) from Piedmont, CA
  • 8 km (5 miles) NNW (346°) from Oakland, CA
Location Uncertainty horizontal +/- 0.2 km (0.1 miles); depth +/- 0.4 km (0.2 miles)
Parameters Nph= 90, Dmin=2 km, Rmss=0.18 sec, Gp= 22°,
M-type=local magnitude (ML), Version=3
Source
Event ID nc71667366

Resolved: Earthquakes with Magnitudes of Less than 3.0 are Not Worth Reporting – Danville’s 2.0 Was No Big Whoop

Sunday, November 7th, 2010

Well, run for the hills, Ma Barker – it’s been reported that Danville, CA had an earthquake of magnitude 2.0 on the Richter (or, IRL, moment magnitude) scale this morning.

Now really, is this event worth reporting if nobody even felt it? I mean, don’t we have hundreds of tiny earthquakes going on all the time? So why inform readers about quakes of magnitude 2, or 1, or zero, or less than zero?

Now, what if The Great Danville Micro-Quake of Novembre 7th in the Year of Our Lord Twenty Hundred and Half a Score, well what if it had had about thirty times as much energy? Well, then it would be a 3.0 and people would have felt it and then it’d be worth reporting.

You know where you want to be the next time a Big One comes? The Skidmore, Owings & Merrill-designed state building in San Francisco’s Civic Center. It’s resting on 288 eight-foot hydraulic seismic dampers. Like this one:

Click to expand

Ergo, resolved: Earthquakes with Magnitudes of Less than 3.0 are Not Worth Reporting.

A Moderate Earthquake Just Hit San Francisco – Thursday, January 7th 2010 at 10:09 AM

Thursday, January 7th, 2010

It felt like a quick initial jolt followed up by three seconds of shaking to those of us in San Francisco. See what people thought about the latest rumblings of our San Andreas Fault over at SFist.com.

The updated report from the USGS indicates a 4.2 near the city of Milpitas.

Right here, “A” marks the spot:

A light earthquake occurred at 10:09:35 AM (PST) on Thursday, January 7, 2010.
The magnitude 4.2 event occurred 10 km (6 miles) ENE of Milpitas, CA.
The hypocentral depth is 9 km ( 6 miles).


Magnitude 4.2 – local magnitude (ML)
Time Thursday, January 7, 2010 at 10:09:35 AM (PST)
Thursday, January 7, 2010 at 18:09:35 (UTC)
Distance from Milpitas, CA – 10 km (6 miles) ENE (62 degrees)
Alum Rock, CA – 12 km (8 miles) NNE (12 degrees)
Sunol, CA – 16 km (10 miles) SSE (150 degrees)
San Jose City Hall, CA – 17 km (11 miles) NNE (29 degrees)
Coordinates 37 deg. 28.6 min. N (37.477N), 121 deg. 47.8 min. W (121.797W)
Depth 9 km (5.6 miles)
Location Quality Excellent
Location Quality Parameters Nst= 89, Nph= 89, Dmin=3 km, Rmss=0.08 sec, Erho=0.1 km, Erzz=0.4 km, Gp=36 degrees
Event ID# nc71336726
Additional Information map with fault names
Google Earth KML (Requires Google Earth.)
ShakeMap shaking intensity maps
NCSS First Motion Mechanism 1

As per usual, t’was the Northern Calaveras (it means “skulls”) branch of the San Andreas. Alum Rock, will you ever win?

Minor Bay Area Earthquake of June 6, 2009 – 3.2 on the Richter Scale

Saturday, June 6th, 2009

We certainly could sense it in San Francisco, anyway, but it definitely was smaller than what occurred on March 30, 2009.  No reports of injuries or damage so far.  See the deets below. It felt very small in San Francisco. It felt “short and sharp” to those a mile away from the epicenter in the East Bay. At least one “weenie Texan” transplant “thought it was a five.” And Commenter Jane says “It felt like a big truck drove up the street in Point Richmond.”

Those in the State Building in San Francisco’s Civic Center probably didn’t feel a thing. Mayor Gavin Newsom would probably like to remind you about upgrading your “soft story” structure. And good thing City Attorney Dennis Herrera is Suing  for Seismic Safety Upgrades at the Mirant Power Plant, right?

Gaia is stirring…

 quake

An earthquake occurred at 3:30:56 PM (PDT) on Saturday, June 6, 2009.
The magnitude ? (not yet determined) event occurred 1 km (1 miles) NE of El Cerrito, CA.
The hypocentral depth is 6 km ( 4 miles).


Magnitude 3.2
Time Saturday, June 6, 2009 at 3:30:56 PM (PDT)
Saturday, June 6, 2009 at 22:30:56 (UTC)
Distance from El Cerrito, CA – 1 km (1 miles) NE (37 degrees)
Kensington, CA – 2 km (2 miles) NNW (330 degrees)
East Richmond Heights, CA – 3 km (2 miles) SE (139 degrees)
Berkeley, CA – 6 km (4 miles) NNW (345 degrees)
Oakland, CA – 16 km (10 miles) NNW (339 degrees)
Coordinates 37 deg. 55.5 min. N (37.925N), 122 deg. 17.6 min. W (122.293W)
Depth 6.1 km (3.8 miles)
Location Quality Excellent
Location Quality Parameters Nst= 25, Nph= 25, Dmin=4 km, Rmss=0.1 sec, Erho=0.2 km, Erzz=0.5 km, Gp=39.6 degrees
Event ID# nc40237749
Additional Information map with fault names
Google Earth KML (Requires Google Earth.)
Waveforms

The Minor Bay Area Earthquake of March 30, 2009 – a 4.3 on the Richter Scale

Monday, March 30th, 2009

That didn’t feel so bad in the 415. A little scary at first, for a second or two. After that you could tell it wasn’t going to be a big deal…

Magnitude 4.3
Date-Time
  • Monday, March 30, 2009 at 17:40:29 UTC
  • Monday, March 30, 2009 at 10:40:29 AM at epicenter
Location 37.285°N, 121.620°W
Depth 6.2 km (3.9 miles)
Region NORTHERN CALIFORNIA
Distances
  • 18 km (11 miles) N (7°) from Morgan Hill, CA
  • 19 km (12 miles) E (91°) from Seven Trees, CA
  • 20 km (13 miles) ESE (117°) from Alum Rock, CA
  • 25 km (16 miles) ESE (104°) from San Jose City Hall, CA
Location Uncertainty horizontal +/- 0.1 km (0.1 miles); depth +/- 0.3 km (0.2 miles)
Parameters NST=250, Nph=250, Dmin=7 km, Rmss=0.08 sec, Gp= 58°,
M-type=duration magnitude (Md), Version=1
Source
Event ID nc40234037

“Unexpected Item in Bagging Area” – the Refrain of Self Checkout at Lucky

Thursday, March 19th, 2009

Remember how it was, back in the day, back when Lucky Supermarket (nee Albertsons) introduced the Self-Checkout Machines and they actually worked as designed? Those days are long gone. See for yourself here on the YouTube, where you can espy otherwise-competent Kurenai the Red Ninja getting pwned by an SCO machine. 

In the video an electronic voice goes,”Unexpected Item in Bagging Area.” But then when the cosplay kids remove said item, they are then told, ”Item Removed from Bagging Area.” Of course the “bagging area” has a sensitive scale so it can tell what’s going on, but the system doesn’t seem to work the way it should.

The horror, the horror of Self Check-Out at the Lucky Supermarket:

Before, a shopper could bypass all this fooferall by merely pressing the “Skip Bagging” button.  But nowadays that just ensures you get into, “Please Wait for Assistance” mode, where you have to wait for help.

Of course, technology can help us generally, but It’s In The Way You Use It that makes all the difference. When this SCO system is poorly managed or fighting shoplifting to the nth degree, then it can be frustrating to almost all customers. One supposes that earlier on, the system was tuned towards speedy checkout and now is tuned for shoplifting suppression.

What’s the solution?

Going to the regular, old fashioned queue with actual people to ring you up?

Pressing the “I Brought My Own Bag” button?

Placing the scanned item down on the bagging area ASAP with a quickness?

Only buying one thing and then jamming a banknote (you know, folding money, with a value that exceeds the price of your item) into the machine? (This one works for sure, by not giving the system the chance to think.)

The ball’s in your court, Lucky.