Posts Tagged ‘School of Law’

Look Out, Golden Gate University! Former Students are About to Sue Your Law School for Overly Rosy Employment Data

Thursday, December 22nd, 2011

I think that’s the right way to describe it.

Here’s the news of the day:

“Attention Golden Gate Law School graduates We intend to sue 15 law schools throughout the country — including 4 in California — shortly after the New Year for allegedly inflating their employment data. One of the schools we intend to sue is the Golden Gate University School of Law (we’ve just added them to our list). Our general rule is that we won’t sue a school unless we have at least three name plaintiffs, and while we’ve secured the requisite number for most of the schools, we still have not reached that number for Golden Gate Law. If you have graduated from the school in the past few years and would potentially be interested in serving as a class representative please visit my law firm’s website (http://www.anziskalaw.com/) to learn more about the Law School Litigation or give me a call at 914-216-3540. Now is the time to make your voices heard and finally hold law schools accountable. Regards. . .David”

Actually, maybe it’s good news that this attorney needs to hunt on the craigslist for GGU grads. (You’d think that former students would be coming out of the woodwork already during this Great Recession.)

Oh, and USF too – you’re gonna get sued as well.

The schools on the list currently:

“1) Albany Law School                                                

2) Brooklyn Law School

3) Hofstra Law School                                               

4) Pace University School of Law

5) St. John’s University School of Law                      

6) Widener University School of Law                        

7) University of Baltimore School of Law

8 ) Florida Coastal School of Law                               

9) Chicago-Kent College of Law

10) DePaul University School of Law                        

11) John Marshall School of Law

12) California Western School of Law                       

13) Southwestern Law School

14) Golden Gate University School of Law

15) University of San Francisco School of Law”

That’s it so far. To Be Continued…

University of California President Mark Yudof Throws Down: New System-Wide Examination of Police Protocols

Wednesday, November 23rd, 2011

Well, first there was this:

And then there was this:

Via Louise Macabitas – click to expand

So. now there’s this:

President Yudof launches initiatives to address policing and protests

 University of California President Mark G. Yudof moved on two fronts today (Tuesday, Nov. 22) to address policing issues in the wake of the pepper spraying of UC Davis students and other incidents involving law enforcement officers and protesters.

Acting in response to a written request from UC Davis Chancellor Linda P.B. Katehi, Yudof agreed to conduct a thorough review of the events of Nov. 18 on the Davis campus.

As a first step, Yudof reached out to former Los Angeles police chief William J. Bratton to undertake an independent fact-finding of the pepper spray incident and report back the results to him within 30 days.

Bratton, who also led the New York City police department, now heads the New York-based Kroll consulting company as chairman. He also is a renowned expert in progressive community policing.

“My intent,” Yudof said, “is to provide the Chancellor and the entire University of California community with an independent, unvarnished report about what happened at Davis.”

Assembly Speaker John A. Perez also had made a request to President Yudof and UC Regents Chair Sherry Lansing for an independent investigation.

Under the plan, Bratton’s report also will be presented to an advisory panel that Yudof is forming, again at Katehi’s request. The panel will consist of a cross-section of students, faculty, staff and other UC community members.

The advisory panel, whose members will be announced at a later date, will review the report and make recommendations to Chancellor Katehi on steps that should be taken to ensure the safety of peaceful protesters on campus. She will present her implementation plan to President Yudof.

On a second track, Yudof appointed UC General Counsel Charles Robinson and UC Berkeley School of Law Dean Christopher Edley Jr. to lead a system-wide examination of police protocols and policies as they apply to protests at all 10 UC campuses.

This effort will include visits to campuses for discussions with students, faculty and staff, and consultation with an array of experts.

The review is expected to result in recommended best practices for policing protests across the 10 UC campuses.

“With these actions,” Yudof said, “we are moving forward to identify what needs to be done to ensure the safety of students and others who engage in non-violent protests on UC campuses. The right to peaceful protest on all of our campuses must be protected.”

It’s Food Day: Watch “Food Deserts: Legal, Social, and Public Health Challenges” Live from UC Hastings at 1:00 PM

Monday, October 24th, 2011

OMG, it’s Food Day 2011, so check the link to see what’s going on about the Bay Area today.

Here’s the manifesto:

At UC Hastings in Civic Center, the UCSF / UC Hastings Consortium on Law, Science & Health Policy will put on Food Deserts: Legal, Social, and Public Health Challenges starting at 1:00 PM.

Watch it on the livestream, why not? Or see about heading over to this free event yourself.

All the deets:

“Food Deserts: Legal, Social, and Public Health Challenges

Start: 10/24/2011 from 1:00 PM to 7:00 PM
Location: 200 McAllister, Alumni Reception Center

The UCSF / UC Hastings Consortium on Law, Science & Health Policy is sponsoring a conference entitled “Food Deserts: Legal, Social, and Public Health Challenges” on Food Day, October 24, 2011.
The conference will bring together scholars from the health sciences and the law, as well as policymakers, activists, and food industry members, to discuss two important aspects of “food deserts,” places where access to a nutritionally-adequate diet is severely restricted.

One panel, Nourishing Our Neighborhoods: Insights from Law, Planning, and Industry, will cover the broad issue of geographical food deserts, usually urban areas inhabited by mostly-poor people whose transportation and finances are limited, where food sellers are predominantly small stores that cannot stock a wide variety of fresh food items, and where full-service grocery stores hesitate to locate. Are there policies (such as those in zoning rules) that could be changed to enable oases in these food deserts? What impact does, for example, the addition of a full-service grocery store have on the health of the neighboring area?

Another panel, Food and Nutrition in Correctional Institutions, will consider issues relevant to prisons and jails. While food offerings must meet certain basic caloric and nutritional requirements, the institutional nature of food preparation and food service might make that food less than appealing, and the healthier elements of meals might well be those not regularly or fully consumed. The supplemental food offerings – those for sale in these institutions – are not likely to be nutritious. Some research suggests that improved nutrition in prisons leads to improved penal outcomes. If that is so, what policy changes should be implemented? Would such changes be cost-beneficial, considering penal outcomes and the government’s responsibility for health care of prisoners?

At 5 pm, Dr. David Kessler, former Commissioner of the United States Food and Drug Administration and Professor of Pediatrics and Epidemiology and Biostatistics, UCSF, will give the keynote address on The End of Overeating. This conference will be free and open to the public.”

Ever more deets after the jump

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