Posts Tagged ‘scion’

Know Better your Corporate Shuttles: Academy of Art University – A Boxy, White Toyota Scion

Monday, September 24th, 2012

Of course, Scion is a “maker” in its own right, but I don’t know the model name of this one. (IRL,  it’s a Toyota.)

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They have buses too, of course.

The 2011 San Francisco International Auto Show at Huge Success at Moscone Center – Mini Cooper Coupe, Scion IQ

Friday, November 25th, 2011

Our San Francisco International Auto Show runs through Sunday, November 27th, 2011 down at Moscone Center.

See hundreds of photos of this year’s show courtesy of Eric Broder Van Dyke.

That’s Fisker Automotive down there on the left. They make the Karma hybrid car. (Half a decade ago, Fisker competitor Tesla Automotive had this very space, but they’ve run into trouble since then and they were nowhere to be seen in 2011):  

This is the second thing you’ll see as you descend from Howard Street:

From the Academy of Art University (“the Art School of Art Schools”) collection:

Isn’t it cute?

It’s a 1959 Autobiancho Bianchina Transformabile, “the rich man’s Fiat 500.”

Lot’s of nostalgia on hand this year, as per usual:

Classic 1965 Ford Mustang pool table with working headlights:

Here’s your Best in Show #1, the 2012 MINI John Cooper Works Coupe:

All the deets:

A huge Nissan something or other:

The American Pride Camaro:

Here’s the Aftermarket Avenue. Why would you need even one flat panel TV in your trunk?

Oh look, Tesla Automotive makes gasoline-powered cars now! These Lotus cars are shorter and lighter than those failed Tesla Roadsters, so handling is probably much better. Oh, they’re a lot cheaper to boot:

Does your Rolls Royce convertible have suicide doors? If not, why not?

Toyota will slam your Prius hybrid these days. What’s next, a factory chop and channel job?

And here’s your other Best in Show, the Scion IQ 3+1. That 3+1 means that the seat behind the driver has zero legroom, basically, but the seat behind the front passenger is roomy owing to the front passenger seat being mounted closer to the windshield than the driver’s seat. Check it:

See you there!

Look at That S-Car Go! Forget About the SmartCar, You Need a Four-Seat 2012 Scion IQ – Coming October 2011

Friday, July 29th, 2011

[UPDATE: Oh, San Francisco Toyota / San Francisco Scion has a clip from Golden Gate Park.]

All I know about the new 2012 Scion IQ is that it’s a total chick-magnet, and that it’s so small it’s going to be perfect for San Francisco.

See?

But I want to talk about the IQ’s distinctive S-curves, so ladies…

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…please clear out:

That’s an improvement, but I want people to be able to see the C-pillar

Tres chic,* Euros but…

Oh, here we go. See the S-shape between the side and rear windows? Look at that S-Car go! Zoom zoom.

So that’s how you’ll know you’ve spotted the new Scion IQ and not the old Smart Car.

Now, did you see these little cuties when the international motoring media showed up in the 415 for a test-drive not too long ago? I did. It went a little something like this. (You know, Scion could have picked anywhere in the world, but they chose us. Hurray!)

They’re calling it a 3+1 because the seat behind the driver is the smallest? It’s for “a child or a pet?” All right.

Of course the competing Smart Car is a just a two-seater. And the Smart isn’t made by Toyota, which is, of course, far and away, the best car manufacturer in the world.

In closing, hurray Scion IQ!

All the deets, after the jump.

*You know, I’ve been to a lot of car shows but I’ve never seen car show babe IRL – I must have missed that era. You’ll need to go to the Old World to see an old school car show it would seem. 

(more…)

Thanks LIPSTICK BAIL BONDS, You Always Come Through For Me: As Seen in the NoPA Western Addition

Tuesday, July 19th, 2011

If Gloria Allred were a bail bondswoman:

Lipstick Bail Bonds appears to be a SoCal outfit – not sure what this ride is doing in the 415…

What To Do When Your Toyota’s Gas Pedal Sticks and You’re Going 120 MPH?

Thursday, January 28th, 2010

Well, you’re probably too young to remember, but back in the 1980′s we had this thing where people would buy Audi 5000′s and then they’d press the go pedal when they meant to press the no-go pedal. Drivers were crashing into swimming pools, killing pedestrians – it was carnage. The funny thing was, though, that if you kept your foot on the brake your Audi 5000 wouldn’t go anywhere.

The Canadians (Transport Canada, eh?) looked into it and called these unintended acceleration crashes the result of  ”driver error” but the NHSTA came up with the polotocally correct phrase “pedal misapplication.” No matter, it means the same thing. To sum it all up, here are some peoples’ takes on this issue and here’s a different perpective from the Center for Auto Safety*

The point being is that the whole theory that plaintiff’s lawyers initially came up with to explain what was going on was complete garbage. If you want to talk about how best to size and locate the gas and brake pedals for the relatively unskilled, a-driver’s-license-is-my-birthright American driver, well then have at it, but it’s sort of funny how these accidents didn’t happen as much in Honda Civics, which had an almost identical pedal layout. And the upshot is that sales did recover in the U.S., and Audi is back to being the sexy chariot of the yuppie it was back in the ’80s.

Anywho, it’s 2010 and we now have a another entry in the annals of unintended acceleration: the 2010 Toyota Vehicle Recalls. Floormats and the gas pedal setup both appear to be part of the problems.

Toyota’s tip on how to operate your floor mats:

And here’s Toyota’s advice on how to not kill yourself when your sticky throttle sticks wide open, from a time when the floor mats were considered the primary cause of trouble (but it’s still good advice):

First, if it is possible and safe to do so, pull back the floor mat and dislodge it from the accelerator pedal; then pull over and stop the vehicle. 

If the floor mat cannot be dislodged, then firmly and steadily step on the brake pedal with both feet. Do NOT pump the brake pedal repeatedly as this will increase the effort required to slow the vehicle.

Shift the transmission gear selector to the Neutral (N) position and use the brakes to make a controlled stop at the side of the road and turn off the engine.
 
If unable to put the vehicle in Neutral, turn the engine OFF, or to ACC. This will not cause loss of steering or braking control, but the power assist to these systems will be lost.
 
-If the vehicle is equipped with an Engine Start/Stop button, firmly and steadily push the button for at least three seconds to turn off the engine. Do NOT tap the Engine Start/Stop button.
-If the vehicle is equipped with a conventional key-ignition, turn the ignition key to the ACC position to turn off the engine. Do NOT remove the key from the ignition as this will lock the steering wheel.

O.K. fine. It still baffles me how a CHP officer who inspected vehicles as a major part of his job couldn’t figure this out when his Lexus loaner sedan’s throttle got stuck full-open. He didn’t know how to navigate the needlessly-complicated shifter into N? The brakes failed? He didn’t know he had to press the ignition off button for three seconds? I mean, I would have thought he could have done those four things done in about ten seconds, but the period of time where the car was out of control was much longer than that.

(Some people say to not try to turn off the engine, but I say go for it. As far as how difficult it is to turn off cars with keyless ignition switches, well, how did you intend to turn off the car at the end of your trip? That’s what you should do when you’re barreling along the highway out of control.)

Could Toyota intall a “brake-to-idle feature” so that when you’re under full throttle and you hit the brakes the car realizes that and closes the throttle no matter what? Yes, it looks like that would end this issue for the most part.  

In the meantime, Government Motors is mocking Toyota over these recent deaths, offering $1000 to Toyota owners who trade-in for a General Motors car. The problem with that, GM, is that Toyota can’t hear your mockery because they’re way up in nosebleed territory on the mountain of cash they’ve managed to accumulate over the years. Nice try tho, GM.  

Somebody could write a book about this, maybe they’ve already started.

Stay safe

*This doesn’t make sense: “…cars with full acceleration take an average of 65 feet to stop.” If you’re saying that cars at freeway speeds with throttles stuck wide open take an average of 65 feet more to stop than similar cars at idle, then you might have something there, CAS.