Posts Tagged ‘sculpture’

Cupid’s Span, That Big Sculpture on The Embarcadero, Has Become a Skateboard Park for Local Youth – Don Fisher’s Legacy

Tuesday, February 5th, 2013

Avert your gaze, “art” lovers.

Via Uptown Almanac and Fecal Face: “Dropping in Diptych – San Francisco, CA – My buddy Trevor dropping in on Cupids arrow on the way to Atnt park.”

Click to expand

Is this what Gap founder Don Fisher would have wanted?

Cupid’s Span

Rincon Park, San Francisco, California.

Stainless steel, structural carbon steel, fiber-reinforced plastic, cast epoxy, polyvinyl chloride foam; painted with polyester gelcoat
64 ft. x 143 ft. 9 in. x 17 ft. 3/8 in.

Commissioned by D&DF Foundation, San Francisco
Installed November 2002

Statement by the Artists:

Inspired by San Francisco’s reputation as the home port of Eros, we began our project for a small park on the Embarcadero along San Francisco Bay by trying out the subject of Cupid’s stereotypical bow and arrow. The first sketches were made of the subject with the bowstring drawn back, poised on the feathers of the arrow, which pointed up to the sky.

When Coosje van Bruggen found this position too stiff and literal, she suggested turning the image upside down: the arrow and the central part of the bow could be buried in the ground, and the tail feathers, usually downplayed, would be the focus of attention. That way the image became metamorphic, looking like both a ship and a tightened version of a suspension bridge, which seemed to us the perfect accompaniment to the site. In addition, the object functioned as a frame for the highly scenic situation, enclosing — depending on where one stood — either the massed buildings of the city’s downtown or the wide vista over the water and the Bay Bridge toward the distant mountains.

As a counterpoint to romantic nostalgia, we evoked the mythological account of Eros shooting his arrow into the earth to make it fertile. The sculpture was placed on a hill, where one could imagine the arrow being sunk under the surface of plants and prairie grasses. By slanting the bow’s position, Coosje added a sense of acceleration to the Cupid’s Span. Seen from its “stern,” the bow-as-boat seems to be tacking on its course toward the white tower of the city’s Ferry Building.”

From the peanut gallery:

“This thing is awful.  I do not understand putting up a piece of ‘art’ that looks like it should be at Disneyland’s California Adventure, smack-dab in the middle of an already amazing view.  Everytime I go by it it pisses me off.  Leave the Bay view alone to it’s own devices.”

“This Disneyland crap makes me want to barf. If only Chicken John had been elected mayor, he would have run his pickup truck into this eyesore and San Francisco would have looked like a real city again”

“Ugh. Really? It’s hideous and tacky. It belongs in Cleveland, not San Francisco.”

Photos from Asian Art Museum’s “In the Moment: Japanese Art from the Larry Ellison Collection” – Opens June 2013

Thursday, September 20th, 2012

Here’s the big news from Kenneth Baker yesterday.

More deets:

“Called “In the Moment: Japanese Art from the Larry Ellison Collection,” the exhibit will include works by noted artists of the Momoyama (1573—1615) and Edo (1615—1868) periods along a 13th—14th century wooden sculpture of Shotoku Taishi; six-panel folding screens dating to the 17th century by Kano Sansetsu; and 18th century paintings by acclaimed masters Maruyama Okyo and Ito Jakuchu.”

This should be an excellent show.

All photos courtesy of the Asian Art Museum:

Shotoku Taishi as an Infant, Unknown, Kamakura period (1249-1335). Wood with polychromy. Larry Ellison Collection

Tigers (detail), 1779. By Maruyama Okyo (Japanese, 1733-1795). One of a pair of hanging scrolls; ink and light colors on paper. Larry Ellison Collection.

Auspicious Pine, Bamboo, Plum, Crane and Turtles, Edo period (1615-1868),ca. 1630-1650. By Kano Sansetsu (Japanese, 1590-1651,By Sansetsu, Kano 1590-1651. One of a pair of six panel folding screens. Ink and colors on gold. Larry Ellison Collection

Oh, and don’t forget about Korean Culture Day this Sunday, September 23, 2012. It’s free!

“IN THE MOMENT: JAPANESE ART FROM THE LARRY ELLISON COLLECTION
Asian Art Museum debuts Ellison’s Japanese art collection, coinciding with 2013 America’s Cup

SAN FRANCISCO, September 20, 2012—Next summer, as the America’s Cup Challenger Series takes to San Francisco Bay, the Asian Art Museum will feature an exhibition of Japanese art from the rarely seen collection of Larry Ellison, Oracle CEO and owner of ORACLE TEAM USA, defender of the 2013 America’s Cup.

In the Moment: Japanese Art from the Larry Ellison Collection will introduce approximately 80 exceptional artworks spanning 1,300 years. The exhibition explores the dynamic nature of art selection and display in traditional Japanese settings, where artworks are often temporarily presented in response to a special occasion or to reflect the change of seasons. In the Moment also considers Mr. Ellison’s active involvement in displaying art in his Japanese-style home, shedding light on his appreciation for Japan’s art and culture.

Included in the exhibition are significant works by noted artists of the Momoyama (1573–1615) and Edo (1615–1868) periods along with other important examples of religious art, lacquer, woodwork, and metalwork. Highlights include a 13th–14th century wooden sculpture of Shotoku Taishi; six-panel folding screens dating to the 17th century by Kano Sansetsu; and 18th century paintings by acclaimed masters Maruyama Okyo and Ito Jakuchu.

“This exhibition offers a rare glimpse of an extraordinary collection,” said Jay Xu, director of the Asian Art Museum. “We aim to present it in a fresh and original way that explores traditional Japanese principles governing the relationship of art to our surroundings and social relationships.”

The exhibition is organized by the Asian Art Museum and curated by Dr. Laura Allen, the museum’s curator of Japanese art, and Melissa Rinne, associate curator of Japanese art, in consultation with Mr. Ellison’s curator, Dr. Emily Sano.

The exhibition is on view June 28, 2013 through September 22, 2013. The Asian Art Museum will serve as the only venue for the exhibition.

For more information visit: www.asianart.org

Eliminate Regifting: Patron Tequila Sponsors Live Art Creation Show on Market Street for the Artist Guild of San Francisco

Wednesday, December 7th, 2011

Here’s the news of the day, from 581 Market Street (between 1st Street & 2nd Street):

“Patrón has partnered with emerging artists to create a unique holiday window in San Francisco to raise money for the Artist Guild of San Francisco.

From now through the end of the year, up-and-coming artists from San Francisco will occupy a formerly vacant storefront window that has been transformed into a space of creativity and imagination. Each artist has one week to create an original painting, sculpture or other work based on their personal interpretation of Patrón tequila’s “Simply Perfect” mantra.

People will have an opportunity to bid on the works created by these artists online at EliminateRegifting.com with all the proceeds benefiting AGSF. It’s also a contest for the artists, with the artist whose work receives the highest bid receiving national exposure in a print advertisement for Patrón in 2012.”

OK then, here’s what it looks like in the day:

Click to expand. This photo only: Silvia Flores/ AP Images for Patrón Spirits

…and in the night – I think this was Saturday:

Take a look the next time you’re in the neighborhood.

OMG, It’s Your Larger, $555,000,000 San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) – Free Ground-Level Galleries Coming!

Wednesday, November 30th, 2011

Well, here it is, from Snøhetta Arkitektur Landskap AS with love, it’s your new SFMOMA.

That white structure shows what the expansion will look like come 2016:

Click to expand – Snøhetta, SFMOMA Expansion Aerial Southeast Façade; all images courtesy Snøhetta

And check the video:

Get all the deets from your SFMOMA OPEN SPACE Blog:

“This morning, SFMOMA unveiled new design details of the expanded building project. The expansion, as you likely know by now,  is being designed by architectural firm Snøhetta in collaboration with SFMOMA, and this morning Craig Dykers, one of the principals of the firm, talkedSFMOMA staff through a presentation of the new designs. There will be new education spaces, lots of light, and ground-level galleries and orientation spaces that will be free to the public.  Craig will be presenting and discussing details of the new design for the first time in public tomorrow evening, in YBCA’s Novellus theater. You’ll also be able to watch his presentation LIVEonline, HERE.

Have you got questions for the architects? Don’t miss Rooftop TV: The Future SFMOMA, a special interactive webcast conversation with Craig and some fantastic guests, Friday morning, 11:00 a.m.

Groundbreaking for the expansion is scheduled for summer 2013, with completion of new digs projected for early 2016.  Here’s the PRESS RELEASE. There’s more detailed info on our expansion page.”

All right, a few more images of all the new work below and ever more deets after the jump

Bon courage, SFMOMA!

Isn’t it kewl?

(more…)

Fantastic “Picasso: Masterpieces From the Musée National Picasso, Paris” Exhibit Leaves Our de Young October 10th

Tuesday, September 13th, 2011

This is just a reminder, ’cause when this show is gone, it’ll be gone for good.

Why go to Paris if Paris can come to you, right?

Pablo Picasso, Tete de Taureau (Bull’s Head), Bicycle saddle and handlebars. 1942, Musée National Picasso, Paris, © 2011 Estate of Pablo Picasso/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

All the deets:

“FINAL WEEKS FOR PICASSO: MASTERPIECES FROM THE MUSÉE NATIONAL PICASSO, PARIS

EXHIBITION CLOSES MONDAY, OCTOBER 10

SAN FRANCISCO, CA—The exhibition Picasso: Masterpieces From the Musée National Picasso, Paris enters its final weeks at the de Young Museum in San Francisco and closes on October 10. The exhibition travels next to Sydney, Australia for its run at the Art Gallery of New South Wales.

This exhibition of 150 important paintings, sculptures, prints and drawings created by Pablo Picasso (1881–1973) is drawn from the permanent collection of the Musée National Picasso, Paris the largest and most significant repository of the artist’s work in the world, and comes to the de Young as part of an international tour. The artwork is touring because the Musée is currently closed and undergoing a multi-year renovation expected to last through 2012. Ranging from informal sketchbooks to finished iconic masterpieces, this unique collection of “Picasso’s Picassos” provides significant proof of the artist’s assertion that “I am the greatest collector of Picassos in the world.”

The exhibition, co-organized by the Musée National Picasso and the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, is part of a world tour that began in 2008 with stops at museums in Madrid, Helsinki, Moscow, St. Petersburg, Seattle, Richmond (VA), San Francisco and Sydney.

Hours and Ticket Prices
The exhibition Picasso: Masterpieces from the Musée National Picasso, Paris has the following hours:

Tuesday–Sunday: 9:30 am–5:15 pm (last ticket 4 pm)
Friday-9:30 am–8:45 pm
Monday–closed

Tickets are available at www.deyoungmuseum.org or at the museum box office.

Adult
$25

Senior 65+
$22

Student w/ ID
$21

Youth 6-17
$15

Child 5 & under
free

Members
free

Organization
This exhibition is co-organized by the Musée National Picasso, Paris and the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco. This exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities. Bank of the West is Presenting Sponsor. Christies and Hanson Bridgett LLP are Sponsors. Major Patrons are Penny and James George Coulter, and the Estate of Mary Price Moffatt. Lead Patrons are The Ray and Dagmar Dolby Family Fund, The Bernard Osher Foundation and Douglas A. Tilden, and the Lead Sponsors are Isabelle and Charles Picasso.

About the de Young Museum
The de Young, designed by Herzog & de Meuron and located in Golden Gate Park, is the nation’s fourth most visited art museum. It showcases American art from the seventeenth through the twenty-first centuries, international textile arts and costumes, and art from the Americas, the Pacific, and Africa.

Address:
Golden Gate Park
50 Hagiwara Tea Garden Drive
San Francisco, CA 94118

Hours:
Tuesday – Sunday, 9:30 am–5:15 pm
Friday, 9:30 am–8:45 pm
Closed Monday”

 


de Young Musuem: Come for Dramatic Platypus, Stay for “Picasso: Masterpieces from the Musée National Picasso, Paris”

Monday, June 20th, 2011

Well, maybe this critter seen below isn’t as famous as the dramatic chipmunk yet, but no matter – our de Young Museum will let you see it for free in the regular collection when you come to ogle Picasso: Masterpieces from the Musée National Picasso, Paris.

And the Big Reviews are In from:

Chronicle Art Critic Kenneth Baker; and

(De facto) Examiner Art Critic Janos Gereben

They both love it, non?

Get your tickets here.

As seen outside the Big New Picasso Show. (And actually, there’s a reason why you can see the Godzilla-style zipper on the back – can you think of why? Look for it, before or after your Picasso tour, and you’ll find this piece somewhere in the de Young…)

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See you there!

OMG, It’s Picasso! – The de Young Museum’s Next “Monster Show” Comes June 11

Monday, June 6th, 2011

It’s almost here. It’s Picasso: Masterpieces from the Musée National Picasso, Paris.

And check it - Janos Gereben and Nancy Ewart have all the deets already.

Speaking of monsters:

Click to expand

Now this is one of the objets that will be hanging about in Golden Gate Park –  it’s Head of a Bull (1942):

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All right, see you there!

The de Young hosts an extraordinary exhibition of more than 100 masterpieces by Spanish artist Pablo Picasso (1881–1973) from the permanent collection of Paris’ world-renowned Musée National Picasso. The once-in-a-lifetime exhibition, made possible only because of the temporary closure of the Musée Picasso until 2012 for extensive renovations, comprises paintings, sculptures, drawings, and prints drawn from every phase of the artist’s career.  The works on view demonstrate the wide range of artistic styles and forms that the artist mastered, including: La Celestine (1904), from the artist’s Blue Period; Two Brothers (1906), from the Rose Period; Expressionist studies for Les Demoiselles d’Avignon (1907); the Cubist Man with a Guitar (1911), the Neoclassical Portrait of Olga (1917), the artist’s wife; the proto-Surrealist Two Women Running on a Beach (1922); Portrait of Dora Maar (1937), the artist’s lover and famed French artist; six Surrealist bronze heads of the artist’s mistress, Marie-Therese Walter; the Head of a Bull (1942) fabricated from a bicycle seat and handlebars; the bronze Goat (1950); the six life-size bronzeBathers (1956); and the late self-portrait, The Matador (1970).

The girls would turn the color of an avacado
When he would drive down the street in his El Dorado
Why, he was only 5′ 3, girls could not resist his stare
Pablo Picasso was never called an asshole
Not like you
Yeah, he was really something

The Eternal Struggle: Bear vs. Octopus on Market Street – The Prize? A Metal Star-Ball, Of Course

Friday, January 7th, 2011

You want the freaky artwork you create to be eternal, you want it to last forever right? Well, the secret of that is to get a commission before the NIMBYs, the historical societies, and the homeowners associations move in to town.

Then, when fashions change and people start to wonder just what the heck were you thinking back in the day,* you’ll have powerful forces on your side to make sure that nothing ever, ever changes. In that way, you will become immortal.

So, what’s The Message here? My guess:

The octopus has the reach but the bear wants it more

Click to expand

And best of all , the same tableau plays out on the other side so everybody will get to see.

Forever…

*That monstrosity just down Market costs $1000 a day just for the electricity

The Fourth Estate, the Second Estate, and the First Estate All Come Together at Civic Center

Thursday, December 16th, 2010

On camera left is the Fourth Estate, The Press, in the background is the Second Estate, the home of Lords Temporal, and on the right is the First Estate, our Lords Spiritual.

In whom do you place your trust?

Via Steve Rhodes – click to expand

Look into the reigns of a great estate

Better lights pull you out of the ground

Seep into the wood of the great estates

Animals your soul will guide

Gavin Newsom Calls for More Giant Glittering Sidewalk Eggs: “Market Street Should Have 100 of These Damn Things”

Friday, December 10th, 2010

San Francisco’s most productive journalist these days has got to be Steve Rhodes – the man is out there in the field reporting on things All The Time.

As it was last night, when S.R. was on hand to catch Mayor Gavin Newsom encountering the debut of The ARTery Project,” which is:

“An exciting series of art events, fairs, installations and performances taking place along Market Street between UN Plaza and 6th Street.”

O.K. then.

Gavin experiencing the sidewalk eggs of famous Robert James:

Via Steve Rhodes

And let’s let Steve tell us what Gavin was saying last night:

Market st should have 100 of these damn things. I can say that now that I only have 30 days.”

A few minutes later shaking a man’s hand: “It is good to see art out here”

There’s still more to do.

O.K. then.

I think I missed all that fuss, passing by a little while later. (You could tell something arty was going on just by the number of art student-types milling about the Mid Market.)

All the deets, below.

Sidewalk egg and sign, Market Street, USA:

Lights on Market Street:

Join the San Francisco Arts Commission on Thursday, December 9 from 5-7 p.m.for the launch of The ARTery Project, which kicks off its exciting series of events with the debut of three site-specific light installations by artists Jim Campbell, Theodore Watson and Paul Notzold and art openings at the luggage store, Central City Hospitality House Community Arts Program, and Gray Area Foundation for the ArtsClick here for more information.