Posts Tagged ‘seals’

OMG, Your Best Way to Spend $125: 2012 Farallon Island Whale Watching Season Starts May 26th!

Tuesday, May 8th, 2012

Check it, our very own Oceanic Society is kicking off annual Farallon Island whale watching season on May 26, 2012.

All the deets:

WHALE WATCH/NATURE CRUISES TO FARALLON ISLANDS BEGIN MAY 26 
 
San Francisco, California – Oceanic Society’s educational day long boat trips to the Farallon Islands, just 27 miles west of San Francisco, will operate May 26 through November 25, with departures available from San Francisco and Sausalito. 
 
Blue whales (the largest animal to have ever lived on earth), Humpback whales, Pacific white-sided dolphins, Harbor porpoises, Risso’s dolphins and Northern right whale dolphins all may be encountered during the whale-watch cruises to the islands and the nearby continental shelf. 
 
An exceptional wilderness area, the Farallon Islands National Wildlife Refuge is the largest seabird rookery in the eastern Pacific south of Alaska – including nesting Tufted puffins, Pigeon guillemots, Rhinoceros auklets, Common murres, Black oystercatchers and cormorants. The Islands are also a breeding haven and home to California sea lions, northern elephant seals, Steller sea lions, Harbor seals and fur seals. 
 
Though only scientists are permitted on the islands, the abundance of wildlife may be closely observed and photographed from aboard the Salty Lady, Oceanic Society’s 56-foot, Coast Guard-certified vessel. The boat holds 48 passengers. 
 
Experienced naturalists lead each excursion to help identify seabirds and locate whales and interpret their behavior. The naturalists also provide informal discussions on marine wildlife and on the history of the islands. Passengers also benefit from the presence of whale researchers from the Cascadia Research Collective, scientists who have studied these whales since the early 1990’s. 
 
Oceanic Society trips to the Farallon Islands depart Saturdays, Sundays and select Fridays from the Marina Green in San Francisco. Trips begin at 8 a.m. and last about eight hours.  Passengers also have the option of departing at 7:15 a.m. from the Sausalito Clipper Yacht Harbor. The minimum age is 10, and an adult must accompany children under 15.  Participants supply their own food and beverages. 
 
The fee is $125 per person, with special group rates available. The fee includes a copy of “The Farallon Islands: Past, Present, and Future,” a 42-minute DVD produced by the Oceanic Society in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The DVD offers a behind-the-scenes glimpse of the natural and human history of the Farallon Islands and provides a virtual land tour of the islands. (Additional DVDs cost $15.)
 
Founded in 1969, the mission of the Oceanic Society is to protect marine wildlife and oceanic biodiversity through an integrated program of scientific research and environmental education. An official partner of the Farallon National Wildlife Refuge, Oceanic Society has offered educational whale-watch cruises since 1984 and is the only nonprofit organization that offers whale-watch trips year round in the Bay Area. 
 
Reservations for the Farallon Islands whale-watch trips are advised. Please call 415- 256-9941 or 800-326-7491 or register atwww.oceanicsociety.org. For recorded information on current wildlife sightings, call 415-258-8220.

Sea you there!

Uh, Are There Really U.S. Navy SEAL License Plates Out There?

Thursday, March 15th, 2012

‘Cause, if so, I’m going to get one for my giant Toyota.

Wouldn’t something like this be badass?

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If a certain course case goes a certain way, that is.

Yeah, that’s the ticket, me and SCORP9, we were SEALS, yeah sure, why not?

(Hey remember when McGarrett was trying to figure out who was killing a SEAL team one by one on Hawaii 5-0? I’ll bet he wouldn’t approve of Navy SEAL license plates…)

The Happy Sea Lions that You Can See from Sir Francis Drake Boulevard

Thursday, July 22nd, 2010

Understand that this was taken about 500 feet above the ocean, but nevertheless, this is what you can see from Sir Francis Drake Boulevard in Point Reyes right by the famous lighthouse:

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You’ll hear them before you see them.

Aar, arr, arr, arr….”

From the Cal Academy, Farallon Island Wildlife Webcam Kicks Off June 8

Wednesday, June 3rd, 2009

Mark your calendar and get your popcorn – soon you’ll be able  while away those lazy afternoons at work glued to the images you’ll see from the “FIRST EVER WEBCAM TO STREAM LIVE FOOTAGE FROM THE FARALLON NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE.”

“Just in time for the first annual World Oceans Day, the first ever webcam on the Farallon National Wildlife Refuge will go live on June 8 at http://www.calacademy.org/webcams/farallones/ Powered by solar energy and perched on a windswept lighthouse on top of Southeast Farallon Island, the webcam will provide an unprecedented view of the seabirds, seals, and possibly even sharks that call these isolated islands home.

“The live webcam feed will be accompanied by animal identification guides, Farallones history, and research and conservation information. This exciting new initiative is made possible through a cooperative partnership between the California Academy of Sciences, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and PRBO Conservation Science.”

It’s going to be mega.

See all them sharks and boids? Well, maybe not, but this is a relatively fog-free day in the Sunset District. Until the new webcam came along, this was as close as you could could get to the Farallones.

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Through the tinted glass of the ginourmous windows of Yelp-rated Sava Pool

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From a higher perspective in the Twin Peaks area, on an exceptionally clear morning.

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Can you see the lighthouse on the top of South East Farallon Island? That’s the site of the new webcam:

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Noisy Canon 10D at 840mm, from Christmas Tree Point Road, a skosh more than 30 miles away

That will have to do you until Monday.

Remember their promise: “possibly even sharks.”

FIRST EVER WEBCAM TO STREAM LIVE FOOTAGE FROM THE FARALLON NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE
Cooperative partnership between California Academy of Sciences, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and PRBO Conservation Science allows Web users to follow the action on the largest seabird colony in the continental United States

SAN FRANCISCO (May 27, 2009) – Just in time for the first annual World Oceans Day, the first ever webcam on the Farallon National Wildlife Refuge will go live on June 8 at www.calacademy.org/webcams/farallones. Powered by solar energy and perched on a windswept lighthouse on top of Southeast Farallon Island, the webcam will provide an unprecedented view of the seabirds, seals, and possibly even sharks that call these isolated islands home. The live webcam feed will be accompanied by animal identification guides, Farallones history, and research and conservation information. This exciting new initiative is made possible through a cooperative partnership between the California Academy of Sciences, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and PRBO Conservation Science.

Located 27 miles west of San Francisco, the Farallon National Wildlife Refuge is composed of three island groups that are home to the largest seabird colony in the continental United States. Approximately 250,000 seabirds representing 13 species and five species of seals and sea lions use the islands. Gray whales, blue whales, and humpback whales migrate past the islands every year. The area is also an important feeding ground for great white sharks. The refuge was established in 1909 by President Theodore Roosevelt as a preserve and breeding ground for native birds.

More deets after the jump.

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San Francisco Tells the Secretary of Interior: NO to Off-Shore Oil Drilling

Thursday, April 16th, 2009

This was the scene today down at UCSF Mission Bay where the Secretary of the Interior got an earful about how San Francisco doesn’t want offshore oil drilling anytime soon. Poor Interior Secretary Ken Salazar  got an earful:

Our state is saying clearly to you today, no,” Sen. Barbara Boxer told Salazar at the opening of the hearing at the UC San Francisco Mission Bay campus. The California Democrat said the state’s coastline is a huge economic asset “just as it is.”

Logistics, that’s what the protesters had going for them today. You couldn’t miss all the furries, like this seal for example. Click to expand:

Or this polar bear, played by nine-month-old Kai Savage, assisted by Miyo Sakashita of Oakland. “23 DAYS TO SAVE ME”:

This is the what you could see on the long walk to the protest area. A passer-by ID’ed these animal’s as “shark, dolphin, whale, orca” in rapid-fire succession. Right, one of those anyway.

Dude was selling American Apparel T-shirts for just $5. What a country!

The only people not wearing shirts were selling shirts. Go figure:

The Sec-Int was prepared for all sorts of shenanigans. For example, “full body costumes” were not allowed inside, officially.

Only Time Will Tell what the Interior Department is planning.

The Romantic, Possibly Gay Sea Lions of San Francisco’s PIER 39

Sunday, January 25th, 2009

These fellows appear to be enjoying a quiet moment at the otherwise busy Fisherman’s Wharf area of San Francisco. Do some animals display a same-sex preference?

Anyway, look for these California sea lions yourself the next time you’re around Pier 39. You know, this is their season in San Francisco. Read up on their storied history here.

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via yosemitewu56