Posts Tagged ‘Seán Martinfield’

OMG, Onegin at the San Francisco Ballet is Fantastic! A Must-See! But There are Just Four Performances Left

Tuesday, January 31st, 2012

If you’ve never seen ballet before,* this is it. This week is your last chance to see the debut performances of Onegin from our world-class San Francisco Ballet in our world-class War Memorial Opera House.

The plot is super simple – it’s easy to follow along. So, as Sean Martinfield points out, you shouldn’t expect a bunch of twists and turns and “resolving climaxes.”

No matter, this production is VERY IMPRESSIVE.

Get your tickets here for tonight or Wednesday or Thursday or Friday. And then it will be gone, before you know it. And then you’ll have the rest of this full-spectrum season to consider.

Vitor Luiz & Maria Kochetkova in Onegin – Photo © Erik Tomasson

Oh, the reviews are in:

Mary Ellen Hunt in the San Francisco Chronicle;

Ann Murphy in the San Jose Mercury News;

Saturday Matinee;

ART Hound; and

Odette’s Ordeal (Wow, there’s a lot of stuff here. Is Teri McCollum going to see four shows in this run? Wow.) 

All right, see you there! 

TUESDAY, 1/31

Onegin: Vitor Luiz; Tatiana: Maria Kochetkova; Lensky: Gennadi Nedvigin; Olga: Clara Blanco. Conductor: Martin West. Performance begins at 8:00 pm.

WEDNESDAY, 2/1

Onegin: Davit Karapetyan; Tatiana: Vanessa Zahorian; Lenksy: Taras Domitro; Olga: Dana Genshaft; Gremin: Quinn Wharton. Conductor: David LaMarche. Performance begins at 7:30 pm.

THURSDAY, 2/2

Onegin: Pierre-Francois Vilanoba; Tatiana: Sarah Van Patten; Lensky: Isaac Hernandez; Olga: Courtney Elizabeth; Gremin: Tiit Helimets. Conductor: David LaMarche. Performance begins at 8:00 pm.

FRIDAY, 2/3

Onegin: Ruben Martin Cintas; Tatiana: Yuan Yuan Tan; Lensky: Jaime Garcia Castilla; Olga: Dores Andre; Gremin: Damian Smith. Conductor: Martin West. Performance begins at 8:00 pm. 

* And if it turns out you don’t like what you see, then you don’t like ballet. And that’s fine, at least you tried. And how much money will you be out, like double the cost of going to see Ernest Goes to Camp II 3D at the Metreon? Something like that.

Wow, Bevan Dufty Goes After The Bay Citizen, Bevan Dufty Attempts to Defend the Central Subway and Rose Pak

Tuesday, November 1st, 2011

[UPDATE: Transit buff murphstahoe has this reaction:

"@BevanDufty calls Central Subway a "very strong connection to Caltrain" - wrong! http://t.co/32xzseD8 #sfmayor"]

First up is a conversation with Seán Martinfield, Editor and Publisher of the San Francisco Sentinel.

Excerpts:

“I feel confident I am as viable as anyone else in this race.”

Disagree, respectfully. An incumbent Mayor losing is like a once-every-couple-decades kind of thing, right? Incumbents have huge built-in advantages, of course.

“I definitely feel The Bay Citizen has marginalized me and that they have reported I’m a second-tier candidate within the LGBT community – when, if you look at the details of the poll, I doubt they’ve even sampled thirty-five LGBT voters in their sample.”

It’s not TBC’s job to spin for any particular candidate, is it?

“And so, you have The Bay Citizen which is an insert newspaper for the New York Times…”

Is that an insult? Is it meant to be? I can’t tell. But I can tell you that one look at its payroll will reveal that it’s a major bay area media entity.

“…and they threw a poll. An initiative like that is about marginalizing me. It’s about telling people that I can’t win.”

Wow. The whole exercise with USF and spending $10k on independent polling was about marginalizing Bevan Dufty? Really? (Maybe I’m not reading this right.)

The Bay Citizen called me “a Zombie” and didn’t even spell my name right in the story.

Zombie candidate,” IIRC. Some people (such as myself, for one) have issues with how RCV and public financing relate to each other under the current rules, of course.

Next up is this bit from Jerrold Chinn at SF Public Press. You can fire it up at 2:45 or so.

“Do you support the Central Subway? Why or why not?”

For the record, here’s the damning Grand Jury report.

Per the video, Bevan thinks that people don’t have any idea that Rose Pak was the first Chinese American reporter at the San Francisco Chronicle? I think they do and I’m not sure how this bears on the CS. (You know, some people want to take steps to improve the 30 Stockton corridor like right now, instead of after a decade of delays and cost overruns. Is that racist to want to improve things now? How is it that “transit justice” can only be satisfied by the current horrible, horribly expensive, Bridge-to-Nowhere Central Subway scheme? I’m baffled.)

Bevan says that “90% of the Central Subway will be paid by the federal government?” This seems impossible to me. Is this in writing? Does it include past and future overruns?

Bevan says that the CS has to come before any other major project, such as putting rails in on Geary. But he doesn’t say why.

Bevan says that we would lose in excess of $100,000,000 if we pull the plug now. I thought it was closer to $200,000,000 myself but of course bad transit decisions cost money. The question is what should we do at this point. (I think we’d all be better off taking a new tack by simply paying back the Feds.)

I don’t know, if anybody wants to go line-by-line on today’s updated critique from Save MUNI, be my guest. (To be honest, I don’t know how anybody can defend the station placement decisions, the car-length decision, the let’s stop at southern Chinatown decision, among others. The CS is a politics-first, transit-last project, IMO.

(And oh, BTW, there’s a pool going on right now around town about what position Bevan will be appointed to and when. FYI.)

O.K, enjoy, after the jump

(more…)

Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms! Don’t Miss Our San Francisco Ballet’s Programs 3 and 4, Running Through March 9th

Tuesday, March 1st, 2011

Programs 3 and 4 are running right now at our San Francisco Ballet. See them before they leave by March 9, 2011, why not?

First up is Program 3, with dances by Possokhov, Tomasson, Forsythe.

The San Francisco Chronicle’s Allan Ulrich just loved the show. Check it. And see what San Francisco Sentinel Editor and Publisher Seán Martinfield thinks right here.

Program 3:

Classical Symphony

Composer Sergei Prokofiev

Choreographer Yuri Possokhov

Yuri Possokhov’s joyous work, inspired by ballet history and his own classical training in the Russian tradition, returns for an encore season.

Nanna’s Lied

Composers Kurt Weill, Friedrich Hollaender

Choreographer Helgi Tomasson

Underscored by the emotional songs of Kurt Weill and Friedrich Hollaender sung live, Nanna’s Lied portrays the dramatic tale of a young woman’s loss of innocence and shattered dreams of love.

By Erik Tomasson

Artifact Suite

Composers Johann Sebastian Bach, Eva Crossman-Hecht

Choreographer William Forsythe

A powerhouse of contemporary movement, this two-part work for 27 dancers is visually arresting and stunning in its complex ballet technique.

Here are your dates:

Tue, Mar 1, 2011, 8:00 PM

Fri, Mar 4, 2011, 8:00 PM

Sun, Mar 6, 2011, 2:00 PM

Wed, Mar 9, 2011, 7:30 PM

.

Next up is Program 4, with dances by Tomasson and Balanchine.

All right, the alcohol is the lobby and downstairs – a very old school kind of set-up with an incredible bar down there. The tobacco is on stage, as lovely Maria Kochetkova (100,000 Twitter followers can’t be wrong) will tell you:

I never smoked in my life, but I’m getting to smoke for the first time on stage tonight.”

And lastly, on stage are your firearms, of sorts. See?

Theme and Variations

Composer Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky

Choreographer George Balanchine

One of George Balanchine’s most regal and elegant ballets in the Russian tradition, Theme and Variations remains a timeless masterpiece in the twentieth century’s neoclassical ballet repertoire.

Winter Dreams

NEW SF Ballet Premiere

Composer Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky

Choreographer Sir Kenneth MacMillan

New to SF Ballet this season, Winter Dreams is a densely layered emotional work inspired by Anton Chekhov’s literary masterpiece Three Sisters.

Trio

NEW World Premiere

Composer: Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky

Choreographer: Helgi Tomasson

And here are your dates:

Wed, Mar 2, 2011, 7:30 PM

Thu, Mar 3, 2011, 8:00 PM

Sat, Mar 5, 2011, 2:00 PM

Sat, Mar 5, 2011, 8:00 PM

Tue, Mar 8, 2011, 8:00 PM

All right, see you there!

 

Spectacular Little Mermaid Ends, New Shows at San Francisco Ballet Start April 8th

Monday, March 29th, 2010

Check out the San Francisco Ballet‘s Facebook Wall to see how much people liked Program 5, the Little Mermaid, the past week.

Programs 6 and 7 are coming up soon – get the deets on them below. They’re what you can see on a Friday or Saturday night for just a little bit more than the price of a movie theatre ticket.

O.K. then. Program 5 certainly was a spectacle. Check the reviews, below.

Yuan Yuan Tan as the Little Mermaid, by Erik Tomasson:

Allan Ulrich: Dance review: ‘Little Mermaid’ casts spell

Chloe Veltman: Taking a Children’s Tale to Dark New Depths

Janos Gereben: Dancing away Andersen’s ‘Mermaid’

Ann Murphy: Stunning ‘Mermaid’ flounders at times in S.F.

Rachel Howard: San Francisco Ballet Star Shines Under the Sea

Sean Martinfield: THE LITTLE MERMAID – “This Girl’s Got Everything!”

Becca Hirschman: SF Ballet’s The Little Mermaid Reviewed: It’s a Bewitching Tale

Barbara Koh: Review – The Little Mermaid

Katie Gaydos: San Francisco Ballet’s ‘The Little Mermaid’ Dives into Dark Waters

And here’s what’s coming up:

Program 6

“Haffner” Symphony
Composer: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Choreographer: Helgi Tomasson

Translating Mozart’s elegance and warmth into visible patterns, Helgi Tomasson’s “Haffner” Symphony is a gracious celebration of effervescence and refinement.

Read the program notes.

Underskin – New!
Composer: Arnold Schoenberg
Choreographer: Renato Zanella

Set to a complex, passionate composition by Arnold Shoenberg, Renato Zanella’s world premiere, Underskin, is an emotional voyage through mysterious and deep emotions.
 
Read the program notes.

Russian Seasons
Composer: Leonid Desyatnikov
Choreographer: Alexei Ratmansky

Following its SF Ballet premiere last season, Alexei Ratmansky’s Russian Seasons is a work of both reflection and evolution as classical poses unravel into contemporary gestures.

Read
the program notes.
 
Thu Apr 8, 8pm* | Sat Apr 10, 2pm and 8pm | Tue Apr 13, 8pm | Fri Apr 16, 8pm* | Sun, Apr 18, 2pm* | Wed Apr 21, 7:30pm
 
Total running time: 2:16
 
*Meet the Artist Interview
Pointes of View Discussion

Choose a Date:

Thu, Apr 8, 2010, 8:00 PM

Sat, Apr 10, 2010, 2:00 PM

Sat, Apr 10, 2010, 8:00 PM

Tue, Apr 13, 2010, 8:00 PM

Fri, Apr 16, 2010, 8:00 PM

Sun, Apr 18, 2010, 2:00 PM

Wed, Apr 21, 2010, 7:30 PM

 

Program 7

Rush©
Composer: Bohuslav Martinu
Choreographer: Christopher Wheeldon

Set to a forceful and energetic score by Bohuslav Martinu, Christopher Wheeldon’s Rush sweeps, swirls, and flows with sophisticated movement.

Read the program notes.

Classical Symphony – New!
Composer: Sergei Prokofiev
Choreographer: Yuri Possokhov

 
For his ninth work for SF Ballet, Yuri Possokhov turns to his roots with Classical Symphony, a neoclassical flow of patterns, dancers, and space.

Read
the program notes.

The Concert (Or, The Perils of Everybody)
Composer: Frédéric Chopin
Choreographer: Jerome Robbins

Returning this year, Jerome Robbins’ The Concert is a truly fun-filled parody and stroke of choreographic genius.

Read
the program notes.
 
Fri Apr 9, 8pm* | Sun Apr 11, 2pm* | Wed Apr 14, 7:30pm• | Thu Apr 15, 8pm | Sat Apr 17, 2pm and 8pm | Tue Apr 20, 8pm
 
Total time: 1:56
 
*Meet the Artist Interview
Pointes of View Discussion

Choose a Date:

Fri, Apr 9, 2010, 8:00 PM

Sun, Apr 11, 2010, 2:00 PM

Wed, Apr 14, 2010, 7:30 PM

Thu, Apr 15, 2010, 8:00 PM

Sat, Apr 17, 2010, 2:00 PM

Sat, Apr 17, 2010, 8:00 PM

Tue, Apr 20, 2010, 8:00 PM

The Reviews are In for the San Francisco Ballet’s Program 4 – See It This Weekend

Friday, March 5th, 2010

Hey, there are still a few tickets left for something-for-everybody Program 4 at your San Francisco Ballet over the next three days.

See what Allan Ulrich, Chronicle Dance Correspondent, thinks here and what Janos Gereben, a contributor to the Examiner, thinks here, and what Paul Parish, a writer for the Bay Area Reporter, thinks here.

And check out the casting and some photos from Seán Martinfield, Sentinel Editor and Publisher, here.

Yuan Yuan Tan and Anthony Spaulding. Possokhov’s Diving into the Lilacs. Photo, Erik Tomasson

Program 4

Petrouchka
SF Ballet Premiere –  New!
Composer: Igor Stravinsky
Choreographer: Michel Fokine

Making its SF Ballet premiere this season, Michel Fokine’sPetrouchka, which was first performed by Sergei Diaghilev’s Ballet Russes in 1911, is a classical tale of a Russian puppet come to life that fuses music, ballet, and history in perfect balance.
 
Read the program notes.

Diving into the Lilacs
Composer: Boris Tchaikovsky
Choreographer: Yuri Possokhov
Returning after its world premiere in 2009, Yuri Possokhov’s Diving into the Lilacs transforms poignant memories of youth into emotional expressions of dance.
 
Read the program notes.
Watch a short video with segments from Possokhov’s Diving into the Lilacs.

in the middle, somewhat elevated
Composer: Thom Willems
Choreographer: William Forsythe

Making an encore performance this season, William Forsythe’s dynamic in the middle, somewhat elevated investigates the ballet vocabulary, redefining its boundaries along the way.
 
Read the program notes.
Watch a short video with segments from Forsythe’s in the middle, somewhat elevated.
 
Watch a short interview with William Forsythe on in the the middle, somewhat elevated.

 

Tue Mar 2, 8pm* | Wed Mar 3, 7:30pm• | Thu Mar 4, 8pm | Fri Mar 5, 8pm* | Sat Mar 6, 2pm & 8pm | Sun Mar 7, 2pm*
 
Total running time: 2:14
*Meet the Artist Interview
Pointes of View Discussion

Choose a Date:

Fri, Mar 5, 2010, 8:00 PM

Sat, Mar 6, 2010, 2:00 PM

Sat, Mar 6, 2010, 8:00 PM

Sun, Mar 7, 2010, 2:00 PM