Posts Tagged ‘September 28’

See SFPD Interim Chief Toney Chaplin and Jeff Adachi at “Panel Discussion on Race and Policing” – UC Hastings on Wednesday, September 28th, 2016

Tuesday, September 27th, 2016

All the deets:

“Panel Discussion on Race and Policing

September 28, 2016
3:30 – 5:00 pm
UC Hastings College of the Law
Louis B. Mayer Lounge
198 McAllister Street

In the last few years, a series of tragic incidents raised public attention to a serious crisis of trust between police departments and the communities they serve, particularly communities of color and of low income. These incidents have led to vocal riots and to the rise of the Black Lives Matter movement, leading to violent clashes between activists and police officers. What are the roots of this crisis? How can racialized practices in policing be understood and addressed? What is being done, and what should be done, to heal the broken trust between the police and the community? This panel on Race & Policing will feature voices of activists, police officers, lawyers, community-relations officials, and academics, in an effort to tackle these important questions.


Race and Policing Panel at UC Hastings
WHO: Panelists include San Francisco Public Defender Jeff Adachi, San Francisco Police Department Interim Chief Toney Chaplin, UC Berkeley Professor Nikki Jones, Former Director of the DOJ’s Community Service Relations Service Grande Lum, Alameda County District Attorney Nancy O’Malley, and UC Hastings Professor Hadar Aviram (moderator).
WHAT: UC Hastings is hosting a panel of leaders in the criminal justice field — activists, police officers, lawyers, community-relations officials, and academics — to discuss the complicated relationship between race and policing.
WHEN: Wednesday, September 28, 2016, 3:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
WHERE: Louis B. Mayer Lounge, UC Hastings College of the Law, 198 McAllister Street, San Francisco, CA 94102 OR watch via livestream
REGISTRATION: Event is free and open to the public. Registration online here.

Today on KQED-FM at 10:00AM: “Critical Mass, 20 Years Later” – Michael Krasny – Commute Clot Anniv.

Monday, September 24th, 2012

Well, today’s the start of San Francisco Critical Mass Week 2012.

Michael Krasny of KQED Forum will kick things off with a one-hour show on the history of Critical Mass.

And then festivities will end, of course, this Friday with the big 20th Anniversary Ride the evening of September 28th, 2012. (Not that you’d know it from the San Francisco Bicycle Coalition website’s “Chain of Events” section, where all info about CM* is now censored.)

Suddenly surrounded by bicycles:

All the deets:

“It started with a bike ride in San Francisco on Sept. 25, 1992. About 50 people cycled in a pack along Market Street, hoping to earn some respect from drivers who sometimes ignored them or edged them off the road. They called it the “Commute Clot.” Today it’s known as Critical Mass, a movement that’s spread worldwide. Supporters say it promotes cycling and the rights of bicyclists. But critics say it is illegal, clogs traffic and antagonizes drivers. We talk about Critical Mass’ 20th anniversary, and its effects on the city.

Host: Michael Krasny


Chris Carlsson, co-founder of Critical Mass who was part of the first ride on Sept. 25, 1992, and has since participated in Critical Mass rides in Milan, Vancouver and Porto Alegre, Brazil

Hugh D’Andrade, founder of

Rob Anderson, blogger on transportation issues and author of the blog District 5 Diary

Tune in at 10:00 on your radio or on your device, Listen Live.

*The SFBC raises money through fees but it also gets mucho dinero directly from SFGov. So that’s why it endorsed Ed Lee for Mayor even though SFBC’s members generally did not and still do not like Ed Lee. Similarly, Chrstina Olague, Mayor Ed Lee’s hand-picked recruit for District 5 Supervisor, gets endorsed over Julian Davis even though SFBC members actually favor JD. The SFBC is basically a quasi-government agency now, so it’s very afraid of seeming to say something negative about certain members of the City Family. It’s also afraid of hurting the chances of its officers someday getting jobs / health care directly with SFGov / SFMTA. Anyway, that’s why the SFBC is basically a SFGov kiss-ass these days. It will lobby San Francisco government, certainly, but that’s about as far as it wants to go. (Think about it – who would the SFMTA endorse for Mayor?)