Posts Tagged ‘sergeant’

UC Davis School of Law Professor Emeritus Cruz Reynoso to Chair Task Force on OccupyDavis Pepper Spray Incident

Monday, November 28th, 2011

Well here’s the news of the day:

“Former state Supreme Court Justice and UC Davis School of Law Professor Emeritus Cruz Reynoso is the first member of task force that will review report about UC Davis pepper spraying from ex-L.A. police chief William Bratton.”

I, for one, am prepared to allow our UC some breathing room on this one. Let’s give them a little while and then see what they come up with, on both this incident and the prior UC Berkeley baton incident, m’kay?

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“Cruz Reynoso chairs task force on pepper spray incident
Date: 2011-11-28
University of California President Mark G. Yudof announced today (Nov. 28) the appointment of former California Supreme Court Justice Cruz Reynoso to chair the task force formed to address the pepper spraying of UC Davis students.Reynoso, a UC Davis law professor emeritus who was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2000, will be “absolutely fair,” Yudof said.The task force is part of UC’s efforts to address policing issues in the wake of the Nov. 18 pepper spraying of UC Davis students and other incidents involving law enforcement officers and protesters. Acting in response to a written request from UC Davis Chancellor Linda P.B. Katehi, Yudof last Tuesday announced that former Los Angeles police chief William J. Bratton would lead an independent fact-finding of the pepper spray incident and report back the results to him within 30 days.Bratton, who also led the New York City police department, now heads the New York-based Kroll consulting company as chairman. He is a renowned expert in progressive community policing. Assembly Speaker John A. Perez also had made a request to Yudof and UC Regents Chair Sherry Lansing for an independent investigation.Under the plan, Bratton’s report also will be presented to the task force that Yudof is forming, again at Katehi’s request. The task force will consist of a cross-section of students, faculty, staff and other UC community members. Reynoso is the first member named to the task force. The task force will review the report and make recommendations to Katehi on steps that should be taken to ensure the safety of peaceful protesters on campus. She will present her implementation plan to Yudof.

Reynoso, a farmworker’s son, rose from an Orange County barrio to become the first Latino to serve on the California Supreme Court. He has a bachelor’s degree from Pomona College and a law degree from UC Berkeley. His distinguished career includes serving as director of the California Rural Legal Assistance Foundation, a UCLA law school professor and as vice chair of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. He joined the UC Davis law school faculty in 2001 as the inaugural holder of its Boochever and Bird Chair for the Study and Teaching of Freedom and Equality.

In remarks at the regents meeting today, Yudof reiterated his support for protecting the right to peaceful protests on campus and emphasized that Bratton’s investigation will be independent.

Last Tuesday, in a separate effort, Yudof also appointed UC General Counsel Charles Robinson and UC Berkeley School of Law Dean Christopher Edley Jr. to lead a systemwide examination of police protocols and policies as they apply to protests at all 10 UC campuses. The review is expected to result in recommended best practices for policing protests across the 10 UC campuses.

For more information about how UC is addressing policing and protest issues, visit www.universityofcalifornia.edu/news/article/26713.”

University of California President Mark Yudof Throws Down: New System-Wide Examination of Police Protocols

Wednesday, November 23rd, 2011

Well, first there was this:

And then there was this:

Via Louise Macabitas – click to expand

So. now there’s this:

President Yudof launches initiatives to address policing and protests

 University of California President Mark G. Yudof moved on two fronts today (Tuesday, Nov. 22) to address policing issues in the wake of the pepper spraying of UC Davis students and other incidents involving law enforcement officers and protesters.

Acting in response to a written request from UC Davis Chancellor Linda P.B. Katehi, Yudof agreed to conduct a thorough review of the events of Nov. 18 on the Davis campus.

As a first step, Yudof reached out to former Los Angeles police chief William J. Bratton to undertake an independent fact-finding of the pepper spray incident and report back the results to him within 30 days.

Bratton, who also led the New York City police department, now heads the New York-based Kroll consulting company as chairman. He also is a renowned expert in progressive community policing.

“My intent,” Yudof said, “is to provide the Chancellor and the entire University of California community with an independent, unvarnished report about what happened at Davis.”

Assembly Speaker John A. Perez also had made a request to President Yudof and UC Regents Chair Sherry Lansing for an independent investigation.

Under the plan, Bratton’s report also will be presented to an advisory panel that Yudof is forming, again at Katehi’s request. The panel will consist of a cross-section of students, faculty, staff and other UC community members.

The advisory panel, whose members will be announced at a later date, will review the report and make recommendations to Chancellor Katehi on steps that should be taken to ensure the safety of peaceful protesters on campus. She will present her implementation plan to President Yudof.

On a second track, Yudof appointed UC General Counsel Charles Robinson and UC Berkeley School of Law Dean Christopher Edley Jr. to lead a system-wide examination of police protocols and policies as they apply to protests at all 10 UC campuses.

This effort will include visits to campuses for discussions with students, faculty and staff, and consultation with an array of experts.

The review is expected to result in recommended best practices for policing protests across the 10 UC campuses.

“With these actions,” Yudof said, “we are moving forward to identify what needs to be done to ensure the safety of students and others who engage in non-violent protests on UC campuses. The right to peaceful protest on all of our campuses must be protected.”

OMG, Pepper Spray: UC Davis Chancellor Linda Katehi will be on KQED-FM’s “Forum with Michael Krasny” on November 21, 2011

Monday, November 21st, 2011

[UPDATE: Via Ian Hill, KQED News:

"We had a technical issue updating Forum last night - Pat Buchanan will not be our guest at 10am. The guests will be: 

Linda Katehi, Chancellor, University of California, Davis
Nathan Brown, Assistant Professor Organization: Department of English - University of California, Davis. And member of the Davis Faculty Association, which on Saturday called for the resignation of Chancellor Katehi over the pepper spray incident.
Fatima Sbeih, Senior at UC Davis - She was among those demonstrators pepper-sprayed"]

All right, listen in and ask questions during today’s big show at 88.5 FM or online.

Lt. John Pike doing his thing, the thing that appalled UC President Mark Yudof:

Via Louise Macabitas – click to expand

All right, tune in at 10:00 AM:

“The pepper-spraying of Occupy Wall Street protesters at the University of California, Davis by a law enforcement officer on Friday has drawn criticism outrage from around the world. At 10am pst KQED’s popular call-in show, Forum, will discuss the incident with UC Davis Chancellor Linda Katehi, who has been the target of student protests following the pepper-spraying and has been asked to resign by the university’s faculty association.

“Mon, Nov 21, 2011 — 10:00 AM

UC Davis Pepper Spray Incident

UC Davis announced today that it has placed university police chief Annette Spicuzza on leave after her officers used pepper spray to move seated Occupy UC Davis protesters on Friday. The incident, which has gained international media attention, also led the campus faculty association to call for the resignation of Chancellor Linda Katehi. She says she will not step down. We discuss the controversy.”

Do San Francisco Cyclists Really “Pray for Safety on Sundays?” Mmmmm

Friday, June 4th, 2010

Check out this recent bit from Scott James: “Cyclists Pray for Safety on Sundays.” Or, better yet, the same bit in the New York Times complete with links ‘n stuff:  “Parking Leeway for Churchgoers Poses Danger for Cyclists.”

O.K. then, I have two beefs. (Mmmm….beef)

Beef #1. Now, I’ll tell you, it never occurred to me before that San Francisco’s unconstitutional tolerance of religion-related double-parking presented a net danger to cyclists. The primary reason for that is that the resulting congestion from church parking slows traffic wayyyyy down. (And actually, I would think that pedestrians would have it worse than cyclists.)

Check it. All these cars were parked (or were in the process of parking, like the red Land Cruiser you can see) on Dolores, the Trail of Sorrow, last Sunday. I’m not sure where the increased danger would come from: 

Has anyone sued the City over an accident created by church double parking? Even the laziest, ambulance-chasing 33-percenter/shyster would have no problem spotting this issue and suing the City (in addition to all other possible defendants of course) specifically on this issue, right? Anyway, it’d be nice to have a for-instance from a cyclist who was imjured due to Sunday parking is what I’m saying.

Beef #2. The SFPD actually has an explanation for its informal policy on the record. Here’s the link from Katie Baker (and I’ll show my work right here). Here it is:

SFPD spokesperson Sergeant Lyn Tomioka confirmed that for me, and stressed that the service is for community activities, not strictly religious ones. According to Tomioka, standard parking regulations are also lifted for Boys and Girls club meetings and elementary school open house nights.”

Now, this song and dance from the police doesn’t exactly float my boat, but it’s the right thing for them to say, certainly. They should be entitled to offer up their best defense, non?

(Oh, just noticed that speedy Katie Baker has a fresh update of her own. I’ll tell you, this is a fight that the SFPD wants no part of. Oh well.) 

Anyway, those are my two beefs, or beeves if you will.

Carry on.

Home Country of Assault Victim Rests Easy After San Francisco Attack

Wednesday, September 2nd, 2009

I’ll tell you, the reason why the home county of the exchange student who was recently sexually asaulted in San Franciscois resting easy these days is that the media of said home country isn’t aware of the attack. And why’s that? Apparently, it’s the policy of San Francisco to not give out that kind of information. Per the SF Appeal:

“Police are not releasing information about the country the alleged victim is from in order to protect her identity, Tomioka said.”

I’m wondering how small a country has to be such that saying its name discloses the identity of any particular tourist in San Francisco.

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Like if there’s a famous exchange program in Monaco (population 30k) and they send ten students a year to the States? That would seem to fit the bill, fair enough.

But what if the exchange student is from one of the following Big Ten tourist-producing countries (countries avec concomitant robust, aggresive media, of course)?

Germany

United Kingdom

France

China

Italy

Japan

Canada

Russia

South Korea

Mexico

If the student is from one of these countries, I’d be hard-pressed to see how saying the name of the country would identify any particular person from that country. Maybe there’s a written policy, or maybe there’s an unwritten rule, the way the MSM won’t report routine cases of Golden Gate Bridge jumpings?

That is all.

About How Long Can You Yell Incoherently on the Steps of San Francisco City Hall?

Wednesday, August 19th, 2009

Well, if it’s around 9:00 AM and you’re by yourself, the answer is this -  not very long at all. You might get in a few stanzas at the top of your lungs, but expect a Deputy Sheriff or Senior Deputy to appear in the doorway after a minute or so (or maybe a little longer if the thriftiest of them are off “feeding the meter“).

Then they’ll all come out, maybe with a Sergeant if you’re lucky. But they won’t care a whit about your bible or your beef or whatever. They’ll just make sure you pipe down and/or move along.

This man was emphatic while making his point about his bible:

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It’s your choice.

[UPDATE: The same fellow as seen 14 months ago in a recent MUNI Diaries post. Perhaps they give you a longer amount of time to get your pont across on MUNI? Probably.)