Posts Tagged ‘sfcta’

A Crazy New SFMTA Plan to Allow Bike Riders to Run Red Lights on Fell and Oak in the “Panhandle-Adjacent” Area

Tuesday, October 4th, 2016

Here it is: The “Fell and Oak Streets Panhandle-Adjacent Bikeway Feasibility Study”

The basic idea is to take out one of the four lanes of Fell and one of the four lanes of Oak along the Golden Gate Park Panhandle from the Baker Street DMV to Stanyan and turn them into dedicated bike lanes.

You don’t need to even look at the report to know that this idea is “feasible” – obviously, our SFMTA can do this if it wants to:

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But why does the SFMTA want to do this? This is not stated in the report.

As things stand now, you can ride your bike on the left side of the left lanes of Fell and Oak, or on the right sides of the right lanes of Fell and Oak, or in any part of any lane of Fell and Oak if you’re keeping up with traffic (but this is especially hard to do heading uphill on Fell), or on the “multi-use pathway” (what I and most people call the bike path) what winds through the Panhandle.

So, why not widen the bike path again, SFGov? It used to be 8 foot wide and now it’s 12 foot wide, so why not go for 16 foot wide? (Hey, why doesn’t our SFMTA simply take over Rec and Park? You know it wants to.)

My point is that it would also be “feasible” to somehow force RPD to widen the current bike path (and also the extremely bumpy, injury-inducing Panhandle jogging/walking path along Oak) independent of whatever the SFMTA wants to do to the streets.

Anyway, here’s the news – check out page 12 of 13. No bike rider (or what term should I use this year, “person with bikes?” Or “person with bike?” Or “person with a bike?”) is going to want to sit at a red light at a “minor street” when s/he could just use the bike trail the SFTMA figures, so why not just allow them to ride on Fell and Oak without having to worry about traffic lights at all? And the pedestrians? Well, you’ll see:

“Minor Street Intersections

The minor cross-streets in the project area from east to west are Lyon Street, Central Avenue, Ashbury Street, Clayton Street, Cole Street, and Shrader Street. Each is a consistent width of 38’-9” curb-to-curb with 15-foot wide sidewalks. All of these streets are discontinued [Fuck man. How much colledge do you need to start talking like this, just asking] at the park, each forming a pair of “T” intersections at Oak and Fell streets. The preferred control for the protected bike lane at these “T” intersections is to exclude it from the traffic signal, allowing bicyclists to proceed through the intersection without stopping unless a pedestrian is crossing the bikeway. Due to the relatively low pedestrian volumes at these intersections, it is expected that people using the protected bike lane [aka cyclists? aka bike riders?] would routinely violate the signal if required to stop during every pedestrian phase, creating unpredictability and likely conflict between users on foot and on bicycles. This treatment also recognizes that in order to attract many bicycle commuters, the new protected bike lanes would need to be time-competitive with the existing multi-use path that has the advantage of a single traffic control signal for the length of the Panhandle.

Excluding the protected bike lane from the traffic signal requires installing new pedestrian refuge islands in the shadow of the parking strip. The existing vehicle and pedestrian signal heads currently located within the park would also need to be relocated to new poles on the pedestrian refuge islands.

Implementing these changes would cost between $70,000 and $150,000 per intersection, and require the removal of approximately four parking spaces per intersection. Over the eleven minor-street “T” intersections along the Panhandle (excluding Fell Street/Shrader Street which which has been discussed separately), the total cost would be between $0.9 and $1.5 million dollars and approximately 48 parking spaces would be removed.

This design introduces a variety of benefits and compromises [“compromises!” Or maybe “costs,” as in a cost/benefit analysis?] for pedestrians crossing to and from the park at the minor intersections:

Pedestrians would be required to wait for gaps in bicycle traffic to cross the protected bike lane (which may present new challenges to people with low or no vision). Design treatments for the protected bike lanes (e.g., stencil messages, rumble strips, signs) should also be considered to clearly indicate the necessity of yielding to pedestrians to people on bicycles.”

SFMTA Inspector Pledges “Safe Streets” But Runs Red Lights on Market

Thursday, July 28th, 2016

I guess he sort-of-stopped in the middle of this crosswalk on Market outbound near Jones…

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…like you can see more than one red here, when the light is against you…

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…but a second later he was off again, to wait for the reds at 7th:

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The signals at the goofy intersection of Market, McAllister, and Jones seem to be messed up lately, IDK why. There was a big redesign to make most of McAllister a two-way street in this area and that worked out OK I s’pose but this hasn’t been a good place to be in 2016.

(Note that the anti-pedestrian chains on the north side of the foot of McAllister have been removed, perhaps to fight crime. This place is pretty dysfunctional, of course.)

Anyway, here’s the kicker – the quite insincere I PLEDGE SAFE STREETS bumper sticker on the back:

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On It Goes…

What’s This, Our Discredited SFCTA Needs to Market Itself As “MoveSmartSF.com” These Days?

Tuesday, April 22nd, 2014

Apparently

Here’s the ad for MoveSmartSF.com, which is the SFCTA, right?

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So what does the com in .com stand for?

Hey, why don’t we disband the SFCTA – is that one of the choices?

New Driving Tax PowerPoint: “Congestion Pricing in San Francisco, Update, September 4, 2013” – Good-Bye “Downtown Core”

Tuesday, October 1st, 2013

We were going to get congestion pricing for just the “downtown core” in the Financh, but now it looks like the plan has expanded to the “Northeast Cordon.”

Here it is, straight from the BOMA people.

“$60-80M annual net revenue”

“If direction from policymakers to pursue further, next step would be environmental review.”

Bus Rapid Transit: Our San Francisco County Transit Authority Studies Big-Ass, 80-Foot “Bi-Articulated” Buses

Friday, May 24th, 2013

Here’s your San Francisco County Transit Authoritah in a nutshell:

“Created in 1989, the Authority is responsible for long-range transportation planning for the city, and it analyzes, designs and funds improvements for San Francisco’s roadway and public transportation networks.”

Well, the SFCTA is on the move in 2013, doing stuff like making new webpages, and, among other things, looking at Bus Rapid Transit for the 415.

So that means studying, like er mah Gah, monstrous buses like these rigs straight outta Mexico City: 

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Now, would BRT be a good thing for those poor souls living out in the West Bay taking the wretched #38 Geary home every night? IDK. I’ll look into it.

Don’t Miss Today’s Big Meeting About Adding a Bike Path to the Western Span of the Bay Bridge – 5:30 PM, 100 Van Ness

Tuesday, December 13th, 2011

Via LivaSOMA comes news of today’s big meeting about putting a bike lane on the western span of the San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge.

It’ll look like this:

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All the deets:

“Open House to Unveil Design Alternatives for Bay Bridge West Span Bike/Ped Path Project – December 13 Meeting to Highlight Concepts, Challenges, Opportunities

Tuesday, December 13, 2011
5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m

SFCTA Board Room
100 Van Ness Avenue, 26th Floor
San Francisco, CA

The Bay Area Toll Authority (BATA), in partnership with Caltrans and the City and County of San Francisco, has developed several design alternatives for a bicycle/pedestrian/maintenance path project on the West Span of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge and will present these alternatives for public review and consideration at an informational open house on Tuesday, December 13, 2011, from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m in the San Francisco County Transportation Authority Board Room, 100 Van Ness Avenue, 26th Floor, in San Francisco.

The open house will advance development of a Project Initiation Document (PID) for what is formally known as the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge Bicycle Pedestrian Maintenance Path Project. The PID is intended to update the feasibility study performed in 2001. In addition to featuring design alternatives, the open house will outline key challenges and constraints, project costs, and the development process for the project. The public is invited to view project exhibits and talk with project team members. A presentation will be made at 6 p.m. and at 6:45 p.m.  Please note the same presentation will be given at both times.

The proposed pathway project would extend the bicycle/pedestrian path already being constructed on the Bay Bridge’s new East Span by taking it around Yerba Buena Island and across the bridge’s West Span into San Francisco. In addition to providing a continuous bike/ped route from Oakland to San Francisco, the path project also would provide improved bridge access for Caltrans maintenance crews, thereby reducing maintenance closures on the bridge. Please note that these are preliminary designs and that funding for this project has not yet been identified.

Project materials will be posted to mtc.ca.gov/westspanbikepath after the meeting. Meeting facilities are accessible to persons with disabilities. Requests for special accommodations should be directed to Meghan Daniels at m.daniels@circlepoint.com or 415.227.1100 x118.”

Truth and Reconciliation Comes to Crappy Octavia Boulevard – SFCTA Hosts Public Workshops Tonight

Monday, September 27th, 2010

OMG, it looks as if somebody is trying to Fix Octavia. Get the deets about today’s workshops and open house, below.

IOW, hated Octavia Boulevard will be getting a little attention in the near future.

(Personally, I’d start by getting rid of all the parking spaces and all the medians – I’d de-boulevard the boulevard.)

Notice the color of the traffic lights?

Anyway, here’s the info. It’s as close as you’ll get to an admission from the Powers That Are that maybe, just maybe, Octavia isn’t just the most perfect thing ever.

See you there!

Upcoming Meetings

Monday, Sept. 27:
SFCTA Hearing Room, 100 Van Ness Avenue, 26th Floor
OPEN HOUSE: 12:00–2:00pm
PUBLIC WORKSHOP: 5:30–7:30pm

Persons requiring translation services should contact the Transportation Authority at 415-522-4800

Background

The Market-Octavia neighborhood has seen several transformative efforts recently, most notably the opening of the Octavia Boulevard/Central Freeway project in 2005 and the adoption in 2008 of the Market and Octavia Better Neighborhood Plan. Octavia Boulevard is the first facility of its kind in the United States in 80 years, redefining traffic engineering practice through context-sensitive solutions. The Octavia Boulevard project has delivered a transportation facility that provides neighborhood access to a regional freeway while providing an attractive public space. A timeline of key Octavia Boulevard events is shown below.

This Circulation Study will quantify and evaluate the performance of the transportation system in the Market-Octavia area and recommend changes for improving travel options and traffic distribution in the area. The study will focus on multimodal and system-level perspectives. These multimodal transportation issues include:

  • Transit routing and reliability, and connectivity to regional transit
  • Automobile traffic circulation
  • Pedestrian crossings and facilities
  • Bicycle access
  • General wayfinding
  • Travel demand management strategies

The study will help support and advance key priorities of the 2008 Market and Octavia Better Neighborhood Plan including improved pedestrian circulation and transit facilities, as well as conversion of streets from one-way to two-way operation.

 

As the study area is both an active local neighborhood and a critical element of the transportation system for regional traffic coming to, from or through the area, the proposed solutions will need to address local, citywide and regional needs. This map of the general local area is consistent with the Market-Octavia Neighborhood Plan. Click here to see the study area map.

Study Objectives

The objectives of the Study are to:

  • Document existing conditions of the transportation system
  • Identify a multimodal package of transportation improvements through technical review and public input
  • Develop cost estimates for these top-priority projects
  • Establish a funding and implementation strategy that considers appropriate levels of contributions from public and private sources.

The Central Freeway and Octavia Boulevard Circulation Study will serve as a vehicle for discussion and coordination among local and regional stakeholders, while providing policy guidance for ensuring integration with the larger regional and long-term needs.

Potential Project List

As area needs are studied and possible solutions prioritized, information on potential projects will be posted here.

Study Products and Schedule

Preliminary Draft Existing Conditions Report. Includes Origin-Destination Survey from October 2009. Completed. 

Public and Stakeholder Outreach. Engagement with key stakeholders and community groups. Ongoing.  Key events planned for September 2010 and November 2010.

Technical Analysis and Project Development. Based on existing conditions and needs assessment, and stakeholder input, an evaluation framework will be developed for potential solutions, resulting in project screening and the selection of up to three potential projects. Conceptual designs will be developed for these three potential projects. September/October 2010.

Funding and Implementation Plan. Funding plan, including fair-share contributions, and implementation roles, steps, and issues. December 2010.

Final Report. Culmination of all recommendations and designs. January 2011.

For More Information

Send an email to Margaret Cortes or call 415.522.4826.

Related Links

Market and Octavia Neighborhood Plan (led by SF Planning Department)

San Francisco’s First Continuously Green Bike Lane Just Popped Up on Market Street

Saturday, May 8th, 2010

Via BIKE NOPA word comes of San Francisco’s first continuously green bike lane, down there on Market inbound. It seems that Dan Nguyen-Tan thought it was so good this morning, he told two friends about it, and they told two friends, and so on and so on

So tout de suite, tout le monde learned about it.

Will this greenery hold up better than the fast-fading beige of Market a little bit down the road?

Via Jamison, from today:

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Only Time Will Tell

The Great Unbeigeing – Market Street’s Traffic-Slowing Safety Paint is Peeling Off Already

Wednesday, January 27th, 2010

You know that beige color (it’s not paint but I don’t know what it is, actually) that was just put down on Market Street? Well, it’s coming off fast.

From this…

…to this:

Sic transit gloria Market

San Francisco’s Market Street is Going Beige This Afternoon

Tuesday, November 24th, 2009

This is the scene near Union Square, inbound, right down the street from the latest the latest MUNI bus vs. cyclist collision.

(Dude got scuffed up by an articulated 38 Geary (or whatever – it’s line number had been switched off) but he looked O.K. when they were putting him the ambulance.)

Anyway, here it is:

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Beige? Really? Wasn’t it supposed to be painted green?

(Beige. I think I’ll paint the ceiling beige, after seeing this glorious color up close.)

But, anything for safety’s sake. Hurray!

UPDATE: Turns out, per Bluoz, that this stuff is called “Ride Away/Greenway” or something. It’s from DaVinci Pavement and Design.

And here’s San Francisco Bicycle Coalition Program Director Andy Thornley chirping up to bring it all home:

“It’s actually “fawn” — I brake for Bambi — though others have characterized it as “cafe au lait” or “mochacino” — if it gets people to wake up and pay attention that’s all that matters. It’s another trial for Market Street, joining the forced right turns at 6th & 8th Streets (expect to see 10th Street turns soon) and Art in Storefronts and other good stuff. There’s more to the “Safety Zone” trial, 10 MPH pavement legends and signs, rumble strips, and advance stop lines that will blossom into full-blown bike boxes (with green pavement, you betcha) once the blinking Bike Plan injunction is lifted. These elements (color, rumble strips, 10 MPH marking) will be combined in various ways at the four parts of the 4th & 5th Street intersections (eastbound and westbound), SFMTA and SFCTA folks will be watching and evaluating to see which things are effective at slowing traffic and getting folks to watch out for each other, and then they’ll take the winning combination and implement it at all Market St boarding islands from Castro to the Embarcadero. Get yourself a fresh soy latte and roll on down for a test ride . . .”

So There You Have It.