Posts Tagged ‘sfgate’

SFGate Knows Me All So Well: “YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE … THE 10 BIGGEST BOOTIES OF 2014″ – Boo-tay, Boo-tay, Boo-tay!

Tuesday, April 22nd, 2014

It’s come to this – my history of clicking on SFGate has finally come to this:

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I love boo-tay (We Love it)/

OMG, SFGate is Looking for a “Music Nightlife Freelance Blogger!” – See the Ad – Apply Today

Tuesday, April 1st, 2014

Here it is:

“Music Nightlife Freelance Blogger (San Francisco)

“SFGate.com is looking for a freelance blogger with extensive San Francisco and Bay Area music and nightlife knowledge to write posts for the site’s Culture blog. The blogger will work with the Entertainment web producer to formulate, format and schedule posts two to three times per week. Payment will be on a per post basis.

Key requirements of the freelance blogger:

– Although national music and nightlife news is welcome when applicable, most blog posts should cover trends, shows, musicians, clubs and events in San Francisco or the surrounding Bay Area.
–Ideas should be fresh or offer a new take on widely reported music and nightlife coverage.
–Posts should be concise, and written in a lighthearted but authoritative voice.

Interested candidates should email a resume and brief cover letter that describes your music background along with link(s) to an online portfolio or blog posts that showcase your writing abilities to: karenr@sfgate.com”

For those about to blog, we salute you.

Sorry, San Francisco Chronicle, But This Photo Shows a Cyclist EXACTLY NOT Riding Down 20th Street

Monday, March 24th, 2014

Heh. Is this a joke, cause I’m laughing:

(Interestingly, an SFPD sergeant last week indicated he was looking into an allegation that the photographer of this shot illegally violated the privacy rights of some people inside of the Main Public Library earlier this year. Interestingly, the person who reported this “crime” is a blogger who was convicted last year of violating the very same law. Interestingly.)

Actually, I advocate riding bikes on some sidewalks. In some instances it’s legal and in others it depends on time, place, and manner. (But I’d never ride on the sidewalk on 20th in the Mission just saying.)

On It Goes…

San Francisco’s Gaudiest Native Bird Has Got To Be the Northern Flicker – Bright Orange with Polka Dots in Sutro “Forest”

Wednesday, January 15th, 2014

Northern Flicker (Colaptes auratus) woodpeckers were hot  in San Francisco back in the day, back when they were getting attention from former City Lights Luminary and craigslist founder Craig Newmark, and the SFWeekly.

Here’s a female spotted back in aught-nine at the “Blair Witchy” Mount Sutro Open Space Reserve on University of California land above UCSF. Maybe she was the life partner of the male Craig used to see in his backyard located lower down the hill? Could have been.

Work it, GF!

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Also known as a “clape, gaffer woodpecker, harry-wicket, heigh-ho, wake-up, walk-up, wick-up, yarrup, or gawker bird.”

Love your polka dots, little Flicker.

Longtime East Bay Resident and SFGate Advocacy Journalist CW Nevius ID’s Cable Car as a “Hyde Street Trolly”

Monday, January 6th, 2014

(You can take the boy out of the East Bay (and plop him in a SoMA condo), but you can’t take the East Bay out of the boy.)

Gentle Reader, consider CW Nevius and his most recent bit advocating for the oppressed white millionaire homeowners of Russian Hill – this time he’s acting at the behest of Supervisor Mark Farrell (R., District 2)

See that*? 

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Now I think the word you’re looking for, CW Nevius, is trolley with an “e,” as in potatoe.

Except it aint a trolley, it’s a cable car.  To wit:

“…electric tram (streetcar), sometimes confused with a cable car.”

And the vehicle code section cited here is wrong:

“The problem, says Deputy City Attorney Buck Delventhal, is California Vehicle Code 21106.1…”

CW Nevius, if you’re going to take the trouble to cite a law, why not take the time to do it the right way? Do you feel overworked, CW? You shouldn’t. Moving on…

And there’s this:

“Stefani says Farrell’s office was unaware of the 1987 law…”

Uh, former law? Or former bill? Did the “law” sunset automatically? And was it ever signed by The Duke in the first place? I don’t think so actually.

You see, CW Nevius, what you should look at are the reasons why the millionaires’ efforts always fail. Try this on for size:

The streets of a city belong to the people of the state, and the use thereof is an inalienable right of every citizen, subject to legislative control or such reasonable regulations as to the traffic thereon or the manner of using them as the legislature may deem wise or proper to adopt and impose.’ … ‘Streets and highways are established and maintained primarily for purposes of travel and transportation by the public, and uses incidental thereto. Such travel may be for either business or pleasure…”

Nevius, why don’t you retire or go back to sports, srsly? Then you’d get replaced by somebody who would do your job better than you, right? Wouldn’t that be a win-win?

But before you do that, why don’t you fix this**`?

“Jose had been struck by a late-’90s, silver, four-door sedan as he stepped off the curb at Oak and Scott.”

“And the intersection of Fell and Scott, where Jose was hit, has consistently been described as one of the city’s most dangerous.”

Fin. 

*Looks like somebody is striking a pose on the crosswalk:

I’m a model you know what I mean
And I do my little turn on the  
Yeah on the catwalk on the crosswalk, yeah
I do my little turn on the crosswalk

**I actually believed The Neve on the Fell and Scott thing, so I was going to go out there a week or two later on a Tuesday night at around the same time on the theory that this was somebody coming home during the evening drive. But then I saw that the actual location was on Oak so now I think the driver isn’t on a commuting schedule. You know, I’ve got a Canon 5D, crank the ISO up to 25,600, use a simple 200mm 2.8 prime to see if I could see some damage and get a plate. I mean it might have been worth the effort.

CW Nevius Gets It Done! A Few Words From His Now-Paywalled Column Stirs Government Workers Into Action – Or Not

Friday, June 21st, 2013

You know, San Francisco columnist CW Nevius used to complain about all the people commenting underneath his writings. In fact, he would dedicate some of his bits to rip on all the uncouths who dared contradict his conclusions.

(I’ll bet he misses those days now, he misses the time when he had hundreds and hundreds of commenters on SFGate instead of just a handful on the Chronicle website.)

Anyway, here’s the latest, about a BART / SFMTA / MUNI entrance near the intersection of Sutter and Sansome:

A sign on the barrier said the portal would be closed until June 4. When that date passed, a commuter added a sign that said: “Or whenever we get around to it.” The date was then changed to June 21.”

But Nevius got BART to change the sign to say that the opening date was pushed up to June 20th. See? Here’s how it looked the morning of 6/20:

And here’s the same location on the afternoon of 6/20:

Oh Nevius, when will all your incessant source greasing and beat sweetening pay off?

Girl With A Pearl Earring: You’ve Seen the Movie, Now See the Real Thing – Dutch Paintings at the de Young in January!

Tuesday, October 23rd, 2012

Look, it’s the Girl With A Pearl Earring:

Oh, wait a sec, here she is:

Johannes Vermeer (Delft 1632–1675 Delft) Girl with a Pearl Earring, ca. 1665. Oil on canvas, 17 1/2 x 15 3/8 in. (44.5 x 39 cm) Royal Picture Gallery Mauritshuis, The Hague, Bequest of Arnoldus des Tombe, 1903 (inv. no. 670)

Well, guess what. They’re going to pack her up and send her to Golden Gate Park to be put on display for the first half of 2013 at our de Young Museum.

This is huge.

All the deets:

Girl with a Pearl Earring: Dutch Paintings from the Mauritshuis - At the de Young Museum January 26—June 2, 2013

San Francisco, October 2012–The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco are pleased to announce that on January 26, 2013, the de Young Museum will be the first North American venue to present Girl with a Pearl Earring: Dutch Paintings from the Mauritshuis, a selection of paintings from the Royal Picture Gallery Mauritshuis, The Hague. The de Young will host 35 paintings from the collection, including the renowned Girl with a Pearl Earring by Johannes Vermeer, The Goldfinch by Carel Fabritius, and four works by Rembrandt van Rijn. Highlighting the spectacular artistic achievements of the Dutch Golden Age, these works reflect the culture of artistic, economic, and technological innovation that allowed the Netherlands to prosper in the 17th century.

At the center of this exhibition is one of the world’s most famous paintings, Vermeer’s masterpiece, Girl with a Pearl Earring. This work, sometimes called “the Dutch Mona Lisa,” is one of only 36 known paintings by the artist and rarely travels outside the Netherlands. Though little is known about Vermeer’s life, the quiet grace and virtuoso technique evident in his paintings, and in particular his rendering of light, have placed him among the most important artists of the 17th century. Many of the details of his technique can only be appreciated through close examination of the painting surface, such as the few tiny brushstrokes that indicate the reflection on the pearl, and the broader, more expressive painting of her ultramarine and yellow turban.

Ever more deets, after the jump.

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Photos from Asian Art Museum’s “In the Moment: Japanese Art from the Larry Ellison Collection” – Opens June 2013

Thursday, September 20th, 2012

Here’s the big news from Kenneth Baker yesterday.

More deets:

“Called “In the Moment: Japanese Art from the Larry Ellison Collection,” the exhibit will include works by noted artists of the Momoyama (1573—1615) and Edo (1615—1868) periods along a 13th—14th century wooden sculpture of Shotoku Taishi; six-panel folding screens dating to the 17th century by Kano Sansetsu; and 18th century paintings by acclaimed masters Maruyama Okyo and Ito Jakuchu.”

This should be an excellent show.

All photos courtesy of the Asian Art Museum:

Shotoku Taishi as an Infant, Unknown, Kamakura period (1249-1335). Wood with polychromy. Larry Ellison Collection

Tigers (detail), 1779. By Maruyama Okyo (Japanese, 1733-1795). One of a pair of hanging scrolls; ink and light colors on paper. Larry Ellison Collection.

Auspicious Pine, Bamboo, Plum, Crane and Turtles, Edo period (1615-1868),ca. 1630-1650. By Kano Sansetsu (Japanese, 1590-1651,By Sansetsu, Kano 1590-1651. One of a pair of six panel folding screens. Ink and colors on gold. Larry Ellison Collection

Oh, and don’t forget about Korean Culture Day this Sunday, September 23, 2012. It’s free!

“IN THE MOMENT: JAPANESE ART FROM THE LARRY ELLISON COLLECTION
Asian Art Museum debuts Ellison’s Japanese art collection, coinciding with 2013 America’s Cup

SAN FRANCISCO, September 20, 2012—Next summer, as the America’s Cup Challenger Series takes to San Francisco Bay, the Asian Art Museum will feature an exhibition of Japanese art from the rarely seen collection of Larry Ellison, Oracle CEO and owner of ORACLE TEAM USA, defender of the 2013 America’s Cup.

In the Moment: Japanese Art from the Larry Ellison Collection will introduce approximately 80 exceptional artworks spanning 1,300 years. The exhibition explores the dynamic nature of art selection and display in traditional Japanese settings, where artworks are often temporarily presented in response to a special occasion or to reflect the change of seasons. In the Moment also considers Mr. Ellison’s active involvement in displaying art in his Japanese-style home, shedding light on his appreciation for Japan’s art and culture.

Included in the exhibition are significant works by noted artists of the Momoyama (1573–1615) and Edo (1615–1868) periods along with other important examples of religious art, lacquer, woodwork, and metalwork. Highlights include a 13th–14th century wooden sculpture of Shotoku Taishi; six-panel folding screens dating to the 17th century by Kano Sansetsu; and 18th century paintings by acclaimed masters Maruyama Okyo and Ito Jakuchu.

“This exhibition offers a rare glimpse of an extraordinary collection,” said Jay Xu, director of the Asian Art Museum. “We aim to present it in a fresh and original way that explores traditional Japanese principles governing the relationship of art to our surroundings and social relationships.”

The exhibition is organized by the Asian Art Museum and curated by Dr. Laura Allen, the museum’s curator of Japanese art, and Melissa Rinne, associate curator of Japanese art, in consultation with Mr. Ellison’s curator, Dr. Emily Sano.

The exhibition is on view June 28, 2013 through September 22, 2013. The Asian Art Museum will serve as the only venue for the exhibition.

For more information visit: www.asianart.org

Know Your Financial District Buildings: Pre-Quake, Post-Quake, Post-Modern, Modern – All in a Row

Thursday, September 6th, 2012

From California Street, starting in the lower right:

400 Montgomery, the Alvinza Hayward Building, aka the Kohl Building, 130+ feet tall, 1901

500 California, the Omni Hotel, these days anyway, ___ feet tall, 1927

580 California, the No Name Building, apparently, 351 feet tall, 1987

650 California, the Hartford Building, 466 feet tall, 1964

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There’s a lot of history in this photo. Do you see the trend – taller and less ornate until, whoops we went too far…

You know who should write about this kind of stuff? John King. Get him a camera like this or something.