Posts Tagged ‘sfgov’

Absurdly-Written Flyer from Our SFPUC that Converts You to CleanPowerSF – “Competitive” Rates?

Thursday, October 20th, 2016

Well, here’s the news:


 has the deets on this option.

“Competitive” means more expensive, right? Maybe not now, but next year, right?

Not that PG&E is so great…


…but I don’t think our PUC should be so proud of the low opt-out rate for its new program.

Anyway, just by doing nothing, you, the SFPUC customer, are “combating” global climate change. OTOH, if you opt out for the PG&E you’ve had for decades, well, you’re a horrible monster.

That’s the update.

SFGov’s Vaunted “Baldies” Revealed to be Mere Minions

Friday, September 23rd, 2016

Does our giant SFMTA/SFGov operate giant Navistar International trucks painted yellow? Apparently.

Anyway, here they are, the “baldies” of SFGov:


Illegal Turn or Not? Can’t Tell – SFGov Doesn’t Do a Very Good Job of Regulating SFGov Drivers

Tuesday, September 20th, 2016

As here:20160912_074619-copy

If SFGov were serious about “Vision Zero” 2024, which it’s not, it would have already started with SFGov traffic.

Oh well.

San Francisco Had At Least _41_ Traffic Fatalities during the 2015-2016 Fiscal Year – Is This a Record?

Thursday, August 25th, 2016

Here it is, the data from July 1, 2015 to June 30, 2016:


BUT, this chart excludes “3 pedestrian light rail vehicle (LRV)-related deaths, which are not routinely reported to SWITRS, to ensure comparability between data,” whatever that means.

I think it means that if the SFMTA runs you over, it shouldn’t be counted as a San Francisco traffic fatality, even though, of course, it would be.

And then, what about deaths from Caltrain? Are those counted? And what about deaths on freeways, like the I-80 and the 101? I don’t think these are counted either.

And what about deaths from regular SFMTA buses. I suspect there’s resistance to tallying all those up, for whatever reason. For example, in 2014, somebody got hit by a westbound #38 bus on Geary near Pierce(?) and that didn’t make it on the official “San Francisco Police Department Summary Reports on Fatal Traffic Collisions” report for that calendar year.

Speaking of which, I don’t think the SFPD makes that report/makes that report available to the media anymore, for whatever reason.

Anyway, that’s at least 41 traffic deaths in one fiscal year – that seems very high. Perhaps it’s the highest ever, IDK.

Mmmm, what if the Dear Leader of North Korea sent word to the Traffic Commissioner of Pyongyang about how all traffic deaths would be eliminated by a certain date in the near future? I’m sure the Commish would say that this goal will certainly be achieved, even though the commish him/herself would certainly know that such a thing is impossible IRL. Otherwise, the commish might get shot, right?

Well, no SFGov workers ever get shot by City Hall, but they act as if risking a promotion is like risking getting executed, so they’re all, “Yes, there’s a chance that Vision Zero will work,” but by the year 2024 and all years after that, forever, seriously? Isn’t there some obligation on SFGov employees to admit that this goal would be desirable, but that it’s, of course, impossible? IDK.

Not saying that Vision Zero, whatever that phrase means, is causing this increase, just saying that Vision Zero, which is basically old wine in new bottles, doesn’t really have an effect on the statistics.

Closing with the news from the Traffic Commission of Pyongyang, NK:

“Goal: Zero Traffic Fatalities by 2024

Fiscal Year 2015-16 Result: 38 traffic fatalities

This metric measures the number of traffic fatalities occurring in the City and County of San Francisco. Every year in San Francisco, about 30 people lose their lives and over 200 people are seriously injured while travelling on city streets. Vision Zero, adopted as a city policy in 2014, is San Francisco’s commitment to eliminating traffic deaths on our streets by 2024. Through building better and safer streets, educating the public on traffic safety, enforcing traffic laws and adopting policy changes, we can save the lives of all road users—people who walk, bike, drive, or ride public transit. Achieving Vision Zero requires leadership and commitment from City agencies, elected officials, community stakeholders, the public and the private sector to find the right solutions for San Francisco.”

The Absurdity of SFGov Promoting Its Impossible VISION ZERO 2024 Safety Campaign in Your Timeline

Wednesday, August 24th, 2016

So what’s happening here?

outoftouch copy

Are we not going to have SFMTA taxicabs in 2024?

Oh, we will, but they won’t ever injure anybody ever, because…?

Because why?

VZ2024 is impossible, if only because SFMTA-regulated taxicab accidents will continue to occur in the future. So even something like Vision Zero SFMTA Vehicles 2024 is impossible.


To suggest that there’s even a remote chance of this fantasy coming true is to seriously seriously underestimate the problem..

How to Get Free Electricity from SFGov – One Simple Trick – As Seen on Market in the Financh

Monday, July 11th, 2016

This scene is about ten yards south of the slot, but I consider it part of The Financial District:

7J7C8196 copy

Perhaps Dude is from New Yawk.

Don’t stop believin’
Hold on to that feelin’
Streetlight people
Don’t stop believin’
Hold on
Streetlight people
Don’t stop believin’
Hold on to that feelin’
Streetlight people

Word on the Street: “RENT CONTROL 4 MIDTOWN” – No Mercy from the Politically-Connected Sisters of Mercy

Tuesday, June 7th, 2016

As seen on Divisadero, north of the NoPA Northeast of Panhandle Area:

7J7C7135 copy

Why don’t these people have rent control in a pre-1980 building in Frisco? Here’s the story from Joe Eskenazi and here’s the official story from, IDK, a public relations-type that we’re, somehow, paying for? Take your pick.

Mysterious Machine Collects Data at the Intersection of Fell and Masonic

Wednesday, April 13th, 2016

Here’s the machine at work:

7J7C4381 copy

And here’s the business end, way up high:

7J7C4382 copy

It’s doing something like this.

All the deets:

“IDAX is a multimodal data collection company providing public agencies and private clients with accurate and meaningful data to serve any data-related needs that they may have. Our team of experienced professionals helps clients by providing functional, timely and cost-effective data collection solutions tailored to the unique challenges of individual projects.

With offices in Renton, Washington and Northern California, we employ a group of experienced professionals and technicians. Members of our team have earned a strong reputation for service and creative problem solving. Our goal is to apply efficient and creative solutions to acquire data for a variety of needs.

Our Operations Managers, Mark Skaggs (Washington) and Deon Fouche (California) are experienced and forward-thinking multimodal data collection project managers. Our team has over 13 years of experience and have established excellent rapport and strong relationships with clients ranging from cities, counties, private companies, and real estate developers. Our team has conducted over 10,000 ADT counts, more than 6,000 speed studies, over 15,000 turning movement counts, as well as travel time studies, parking studies, and origin-destination video studies. We use a variety of methodologies, and utilize the latest technologies to conduct efficient studies best suited to the unique needs of each client.

Contact us today.

Washington – Mark Skaggs (425) 250-0777 |

Northern California – Deon Fouche (415) 757-7714 |

Here’s How “Tech” is Going to “Give Back” to Frisco: BY SPYING ON OUR GARBAGE – Will “Bin Sensors” Come to YOUR Recycling?

Monday, February 29th, 2016

Here you go, STARTUP IN RESIDENCE (STIR) is a small federal pork program designed to bring together government and startups to explore ways to use technology to make government more accountable, efficient and responsive.

Per this program, one of our “CIVIC NEEDS” is a way for SFGov to:

…track waste disposal more efficiently and effectively and optimize waste collection by using optical or weight measuring sensor technologies…

For better or worse. (Call it the grbg.SPY! 1.0 app, if you want.)

Compare that with this “world-class” plan from 2008:

Garbage collectors would inspect San Francisco residents’ trash to make sure pizza crusts aren’t mixed in with chip bags or wine bottles under a proposal by Mayor Gavin Newsom. And if residents or businesses don’t separate the coffee grounds from the newspapers, they would face fines of up to $1,000 and eventually could have their garbage service stopped.

Sadly, the Comments section for this article has been lost in the sands of time, but the reaction was pretty fierce, IIRC. Then the proposed fine for regular citizens got marked down to parking ticket territory and then, like many SFGov trial balloons, it simply went away.

So what we’ve had the past eight years is an education / nagging program, which, per STIR, has “stagnated.”

Last I heard, San Francisco was going to be sending zero (0) tons of garbage to landfills by the year 2020. ZeroWaste or Zero Waste they call it. Now, is this possible? IDK, sure. It’s improbable IRL, but certainly not impossible.

But let’s review. Is STIR pork-barrel spending? Hell yes. Is it lean and mean? No, not at all. (Just click to the next page to see a host of SFGov-types listed.)

But judge for yourself, Gentle Reader.

*Compare that with VisionZero, the plan to magically eliminate all transportation injuries in San Francisco starting in 2024 and continuing forever. That’s just not going to happen.


A Brief History of Division Street’s Homeless People in Tents, 2015-2016 – Plus Theories: El Nino v. Super Bowl 50

Wednesday, February 24th, 2016

Well, let’s go way back for starters, back when the Bicycle Thieves Of San Francisco aimed to steal your entire bike. They’d sometimes get caught with stolen bikes and car jacks.*

But these days, it’s bike parts thieves seem to settle for, so cyclists need to protect not just the frame but also the wheels, the saddle and the headset, and other bits too, if you can.

So that means that today’s bike thief needs room to store stuff and that’s where Division Street comes in. It’s been a good place to park a vehicle or pitch a tent without being bothered too much, plus it’s close to the action – it’s close to 7th and Market and the Main Library.

This is what things looked like under the I-80 before Fall 2015 as I remember things:


This is how I remember things being for a decade or two.

But then all of a sudden, instead of a few tents here and there, a bunch of tents popped up. They filled up practically every possible space in lines that stretched from Costco #144 all the way to South Van Ness. I’m guessing this occurred  anywhere from mid-to-late November 2015 to early December at the latest.

This is part of the north (aka west) side of Division on Dec. 13th:


Compare that with this shot of the same place on Dec. 9th

And this is the other side of the street closer to 10th Street at the end of December:





I’ll tell you, most of these hundreds of people are NOT bike thieves.

So why did they show up here at the end of 2015?

The Holidays? I could see why the SFPD et al might want to ignore things until after Thanksgiving, Christmas and whatnot.

El Nino? This would be a good place to stay out of most of the rain, of course, and the forecast was for lots of it coming soon.

Super Bowl 50? The corporate party part of Super Bowl 50 had lots of knock-on effects for SFGov – it seemed like each and every SF Department was gearing up. At the time I thought, well, this doesn’t look too good either, if this is the alternative to homeless people hanging out near Super Bowl City in the Financial.

Availability of Tents? I remember seeing truck upon truck delivering stuff here, something like an FM radio station with “Chuy in the Morning” written on the side, something like that. So sure, food, but tents too? IDK.

Those are some ideas, anyway.

I don’t know, if SFGov cleans out all these tents in February 2016, will that end shoplifting at Rainbow Grocery?

We’ll find out soon enough.

Anyway, that’s your brief history of the tents on Division from 2015-2016.

*Stolen from the trunks of boxy Volvos. It was a thing.