Posts Tagged ‘sfpark’

Once Again, SFPark Overestimates Demand for Parking, This Time It’s Near Japantown

Thursday, October 24th, 2013

Hey, I know! Why not base the SFPark on market pricing?

Uh, SFMTA? Just because something “makes money” for you doesn’t mean that it’s good for San Francisco…

The Legacy of SFPark: Scores of Unused Parking Spaces at New, Federally-Subsidized Meters

Tuesday, July 23rd, 2013

[UPDATE: Confession time - I've never used a "smart" parking meter, so I don't know what they look like. I know the SFPark meters have blue stickers on the sides, that's about it. So the new meters depicted below are not SFPark meters and, ergo, they were not advertised as being "good for all drivers." Anyway, read the comments to see my error.]

So SFPark is “good for all drivers?”

Perhaps for some, but not for those who used to park here, in the project-y Western Addition.

Turk on a weekday:

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Hey SFPark/SFMTA/DPT/MUNI, why not try market-rate pricing instead?

You know, pricing lower than what you’re charging now.

Just asking…

Oh, and is SFPark good for federal taxpayers?

Discuss.

Oh and is the Central Subway good for federal taxpayers?

Discuss that too, if you want…

Photographic Evidence of Official San Francisco Corruption: Free Parking for SFGov Employees Attending Giants Games

Monday, April 8th, 2013

I didn’t take these photos, but I’ll tell you, I’ve seen a lot of corruption regarding free parking for SFGov employees in the SoMA area, so I believe them.

Here’s a photo essay with captions from Jim, who went on a walkabout yesterday.

Take a look:

“There are the People who pay up front to park in a lot, $25-$70. There are the people who feed meters but many of those wind up paying $72 to the City long after the last pitch. And there are those who play the system and possibly cheat and pay nothing for parking in a “red zone” with the help from “winking and nodding” SFMTA Parking Control Officers.

All these photos were taken within a 50 foot circle near 2nd & Townsend at 2:15 P.M. on Sunday April 7, 2013 during the Giants/St. Louis Baseball game.

1) Number 1 shows what the average slug must pay for parking for the Giant’s game at 2 in the afternoon, i.e. $70.

,

2) Number 2 shows a Handicapped placard vehicle getting free Giants game parking in the “red zone” of the SFFD at Second & Townsend. Handicapped placard holders may not park in “red zones.”

3) What appears to be several private vehicles of S.F. firefighters parked in the “red zone” claiming to be working by their Official Papers on the Dash. Is it mere code for “don’t ticket a fellow City employee?”

4) Several motorcycles getting ticketed (TC27, 219) for expired meters by the PCO who just drove by the “red zones” without seeing cause to stop.

5) Photo of SFFD Headquarters at 9:30 A.M., Sunday April 7, 2013 in case you think a lot of people work there on a Sunday.

 

DPT SFPark Fail: Expensive Sensors “Bedeviled by Electromagnetic Interference from Overhead Trolley Lines” per NYT

Wednesday, December 26th, 2012

Instead of the SFMTA MUNI DPT SFPark happy talk what you’ve been getting from the San Francisco Examiner, why not check out what the New York Times has to say about San Francisco’s expensive SFPark new parking meter program.

“PLACE “smart” in front of a noun and you immediately have something that somehow sounds improved.”

Heh.

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Qualcomm Makes a YouTube of Jay Nath, Chief Innovation Officer of San Francisco, and Nobody Watches

Thursday, December 6th, 2012

So let’s see here, Jay Nath shoots a commercial for Qualcomm and then nobody, and I mean nobody, watches it.

Check it:

Here’s a bon mot:

“We see this digital space of empowering our citizens as the next generation of city government,” Jay Nath, Chief Innovation Officer San Francisco.”

And here’s another:

“When allowed to flourish, mobile can transform lives in tangible ways, as we increasingly become more connected to each other. This episode features Jay Nath, the Chief Innovation Officer of San Francisco and Rob Chappell of Neighborland, a mobile app to empower citizens as they talk about how technology leads to “connected empowerment.”

Observations:

1. “Chief Innovation Officer?” HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA! How “innovative.” Not.

2. Are those goofy green $1000 office chairs for real? SFGov really paid for those?

3. How many days of shooting did Qualcomm do of you riding your bike around wearing a suit?

4. Were you contractually obligated to be pawing an off-brand tablet what looked just like the off-brand tablet the other dude had? Like pads are for bidness, is that supposed to be the takeaway here. you know for the two people / bots who press play on your video each day?

5. And isn’t SFPark just a way for the SFMTA to continue to increase its budget waaaaaaaay past the inflation rate? I mean, that’s the reason for SFPark, right?

Now, isn’t San Francisco still The Worst-Run Big City in the U.S?

I think so.

Shouldn’t you be working on that, you know, the corruption instead of yammering about “empowerment,” which, you know, comes off a little patronizing, right?

I think so.

In closing, empowerment, Qualcomm, world-class, innovation capital of the world, natural amphitheatre, dramatic transformation, have I missed any already-dated buzz phrases?

Sometimes I just d0n’t know…

Accusations of corruption over parking garage contract

SFPD chief dissatisfied with outdated computer system

Civil Grand Jury slams Central Subway project

Slate.Com Wrote About San Francisco and Yelp and Cities.Data.Gov Today – But What Does It Mean?

Wednesday, September 5th, 2012

Take a look here:

The Most Important Information Missing From Yelp – Crowdsourcing sites and local government should pool their data to better inform consumers.”

Let’s check it:

“Last month, four major cities—San Francisco, New York City, Chicago, and Seattle—put statistics on things like crime reports, restaurant ratings, bed bug complaints, and public restroom locations online at cities.data.gov.”

So can we easily look up info about bed bugs in San Francisco on this newish website?

Nope!

Also:

“…a major frustration in urban centers is the amount of time spent trying to find a parking spot. To address this problem and improve air quality, San Francisco launched SFPark…”

So has SFPark reduced the amount of time spent trying to find a parking spot?

Nope!

And has SFPark improved air quality?

Nope!

SFPark is all about getting more money to the SFMTA, IRL.

Continuing:

“…consider the Bike Accident Tracker, a tool created by the Bay Citizen that mapped all reported bicycling accidents in San Francisco over a five-year period. On the map, the intersection of Market and Castro was identified as a hot spot…”

Uh, I think we kind of already knew about hot spots as the MSM regularly reports on them and it’s been doing that for donkey’s years.

Continuing:

” Just this past April a cyclist hit and killed a pedestrian at that same intersection, according the San Francisco Chronicle. If accident data were integrated with a site like Google Maps, making the critical information more easily available, is it possible that the deadly accident at Market and Castro could have been avoided? I’m not sure, but it’s worth looking into.”

Cyclist Chris Bucchere really, really liked Strava.com, and he really liked going fast downhill in urban areas, and he actually raised the idea of Strava segment “winners” (so-called “Kings of the Mountain”) “winning” coffee as an incentive/reward just a few days before the death of Sutchi Hui. I’m totally baffled how hot spot data dissemination would have affected anything.

All right, well that’s the first webpage of the article by Alissa Black (an ASU student?). I think I’ll stop here.

Uh, the reason why data about which hotels have bed bugs isn’t more widely disseminated is because the hotel industry doesn’t like that kind of thing.

And the reason why people walking into San Francisco restaurants don’t see a letter grade displayed out front is because the Golden Gate Restaurant Association doesn’t  want that kind of thing.

I don’t think the writer of the linked bit above understands how SF works.

JMO.

BMW Comes to San Francisco to Introduce Us All to DriveNow, ParkNow, and, I’m Seriously, ParkAtMyHouse

Tuesday, August 21st, 2012

BMW, the company what has “32 Rolls-Royce Motor Car” dealerships in the U.S., came to town yesterday to promote … BMW.

Hurray!

Deets below. Here’s your boner preview:

“An estimated one-third of all downtown traffic on weekdays is due to vehicles searching for a parking spot.”

ABSURD. DUDE DRIVES UP FROM SAN MATEO TO PARK AT 2 EMBARCADERO. FOR INSTANCE. HE MIGHT SPEND A TON OF TIME GETTING IN AND OUT OF THE FINANCH, SURE, BUT ZERO PERCENT OF THAT TIME IS SPENT “SEARCHING” FOR A SPOT. DO BUS DRIVERS SEARCH FOR PARKING SPACES IN THEIR BUSES? DO BIKE RIDERS? DO UPS DRIVERS? SIMPLY ABSURD.

“San Francisco is the ‘Innovation Capital of the World’ and the car sharing and EV Capital of America,” 

ABSURD. JUST BECAUSE YOU SAY SOMETHING OVER AND OVER, THAT DOESN’T MAKE IT TRUE.

“…enables users to pay for parking in advance…”

WHAT? I THINK THIS SERVICE IS FOR RICH, STUPID PEOPLE, THE GROUP THAT WAS TARGETED BY SFPARK.

So, why don’t you have an electric vehicle, Mayor Ed Lee?

Better yet, why not just ditch the car and ride a bike or take transit to get to your appointments?

Otherwise, you’re just all talk and no action.

And exactly how many rich stupids are out there to support a “premium car service” such as this? Maybe out-of-towners who don’t where to park would take “advantage” of this?

And gee, if you only want to go on a trip in a “premium” “sports” “motor car,” if that’s your deal-breaker, well, maybe you don’t really need to go on that trip.

Michael Cabanatuan explains it all for you here, if that’ll help.

At least I understand how Audi Avenue works over there in Union Square - Audi writes a seven-figure check and burnishes its image.

But BMW, what do you get out of this? Who’s going to download your stupid apps?

But I’ve digressed.

Have at it:

“BMW Group Announces Launch of ParkNow Mobile Parking Service and Details DriveNow Car-Sharing Service, Featuring 70 All-Electric BMW ActiveE Vehicles, in San Francisco

SAN FRANCISCO, Aug. 20, 2012 — At a press conference with San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee, BMW Group Member of the Board Dr. Ian Robertson today announced the upcoming launch of ParkNow, an innovative mobile parking solution that is a joint venture with Urban Mobility, and provided new details about DriveNow, a unique premium car-sharing service which features a fleet of BMW ActiveE all-electric vehicles.  San Francisco serves as the initial U.S. market for each service.

San Francisco is at the forefront of cities working to develop and implement innovative approaches to urban challenges, including traffic congestion and the need for smarter, greener parking systems. There are an estimated 505,000 vehicles in San Francisco, yet only 448,000 parking spaces available at any given time.  On weekdays, the total vehicle population increases by approximately 35,000.  An estimated one-third of all downtown traffic on weekdays is due to vehicles searching for a parking spot.

“The BMW Group is more than a premium car company, it is also focused on developing and delivering new services to help meet the increasing need for flexible mobility solutions in our cities,” said Dr. Robertson. “The premium car-sharing service DriveNow and parking solution ParkNow will help meet that demand in San Francisco and, ultimately, in other cities. Our introduction of these services in San Francisco represents BMW’s commitment to encouraging the development of new mobility options that will reduce emissions and congestion and improve the quality of life for San Franciscans.”

“San Francisco is the ‘Innovation Capital of the World’ and the car sharing and EV Capital of America,” said Mayor Lee.  “I am pleased that BMW has chosen San Francisco as the first U.S. site for its innovative services and has launched their program entirely with electric vehicles.”

ParkNow, which will be available to drivers beginning in September, is an online mobile parking service that enables users to pay for parking in advance, with guaranteed access and clearly defined rates, based on their personal preferences. Customers can search for parking using ParkNow’s mobile app or website, reserve, pay and then be navigated directly to the parking facility, reducing time spent looking for parking, as well as emissions. There are currently 14 ParkNow locations in and around San Francisco piloting the system. Stations are located around the city, close to BART (Bay Area Rapid Transit), Muni (San Francisco Municipal Railway)and bike-sharing stations, as well as at San Francisco International Airport, Oakland International Airport and in Palo Alto. Four ParkNow partner operators, ProPark America, Towne Park, ABM Parking and California Parking, will launch over 100 additional ParkNow locations in the coming weeks.

DriveNow which launched in June in San Francisco is a flexible, premium car-sharing program offering the opportunity to drive BMW’s first all-electric vehicle, the BMW ActiveE with zero emission driving. The fleet of 70 ActiveE vehicles is located at eight DriveNow Stations around San Francisco, with two additional stations in Palo Alto and at the San Francisco International Airport coming soon.  After registering online or in-person, customers can locate and book an available car using the DriveNow web site or mobile app. They can then return the car to the same – or any other – DriveNow Station, allowing for convenient one-way trips, if desired. Stations are located around the city, close to BART, MUNI and bike-sharing stations. Through a partnership with California-based Coulomb Technologies’ ChargePoint network, the largest network of independently-owned electric vehicle charging stations, drivers can easily locate a nearby charging station if they need to top-off during the course of their rental, which has no time limit. Parking and charging is free at DriveNow Stations.

All of these initiatives are part of BMW i, a BMW brand focused on developing sustainable premium mobility solutions. Richard Steinberg is the CEO of DriveNow. Gary Neff is the CEO of ParkNow.

BMW is a Launch Partner of the non-profit Green Parking Council. GPC works at the intersection of parking, green building, clean technology, renewable energy, smart grid infrastructure, urban planning and sustainable mobility. By challenging the parking industry to collaborate and create open-sourced, sustainable best practices, GPC encourages exceptional industry transformation through partnerships, creativity and ingenuity.

BMW i Ventures is the automaker’s venture capital company, created to fund budding technology companies working to solve mobility challenges in the world’s most densely populated cities. It has made strategic investments in several companies, including Coulomb Technologies. Coulomb’s ChargePoint is the largest online global charging network, connecting electric vehicle drivers to charging stations in more than 14 countries. The investment by BMW supports the development of infrastructure for plug-in electric vehicles.

Other investments include ParkAtMyHouse, an innovative online marketplace designed to connect home and business owners interested in earning money by renting their space with drivers in need of a convenient, safe and cost-effective place to park. The service has 20,000 unique locations and over 150,000 registered drivers. An international rollout in cooperation with BMW i is currently live in the UK, Ireland, Canada and the U.S. The first i Ventures investment was in MyCityWay, a set of location-aware apps for urban navigation that provide users with information on public transportation, parking availability and local entertainment in San Francisco and 70 other cities across the U.S. and around the world.

The BMW i brand also notably encompasses two revolutionary new vehicles set to launch in 2013 and 2014 – the BMW i3 and BMW i8. The BMW i3 and BMW i8 will become the first two production vehicles to be purpose-built as electric and hybrid-electric using entirely new methods and materials such as lightweight, but ultra-strong carbon fiber reinforced plastic, which is being produced at a BMW factory powered by hydroelectricity in Moses Lake, Washington.

For more information, please visit http://www.bmw-i.com/mobilityservices and www.drive-now.com.

BMW Group in America

BMW of North America, LLC has been present in the United States since 1975. Rolls-Royce Motor Cars NA, LLC began distributing vehicles in 2003. The BMW Group in the United States has grown to include marketing, sales, and financial service organizations for the BMW brand of motor vehicles, including motorcycles, the MINI brand, and the Rolls-Royce brand of Motor Cars; DesignworksUSA, a strategic design consultancy in California; a technology office in Silicon Valley and various other operations throughout the country. BMW Manufacturing Co., LLC in South Carolina is part of BMW Group’s global manufacturing network and is the exclusive manufacturing plant for all X5 and X3 Sports Activity Vehicles and X6 Sports Activity Coupes. The BMW Group sales organization is represented in the U.S. through networks of 339 BMW passenger car and BMW Sports Activity Vehicle centers, 139 BMW motorcycle retailers, 114 MINI passenger car dealers, and 32 Rolls-Royce Motor Car dealers. BMW (US) Holding Corp., the BMW Group’s sales headquarters for North America, is located in Woodcliff Lake, New Jersey.

Information about BMW Group products is available to consumers via the Internet at:  www.bmwgroupna.com.

And the Leader of the Great SoMA Mission Bay Dogpatch SFPark Parking Revolt is Now… Supervisor Jane Kim?

Wednesday, July 18th, 2012

Apparently:

 “People should have to pay for parking. I’m just wondering if there is a less punitive way of doing it for residents,” she said. “I was hoping for more thoughtful alternatives.”

Well that’s Phase 1 – it’s a start.

Phase 2 just might be Direct Action, taking it to the streets to pull up the infernal SFPark meters up by their very roots.

Like this. Achtung, Baby!

Click to expand

Until that time, the Revolution will continue to be led by Meter Madness and the SFPark.info.

In struggle…

1 PETITIONS

They’re Ba-aaack! The SFMTA Tries to Impose SFPark on Mission Bay Once Again – Plus SFPark.info Website

Friday, May 25th, 2012

I’ll tell you, when the Imperial Japanese Navy tried to invade Wake Island back in WWII, their first attempt, which involved months of planning, failed. The IJN was highly embarrassed but they knew that it was their job to impose themselves on Wake, to “manage” Wake, so they came back and succeeded on their second try. (And they beheaded a few Marines, but, byegones…)

And I’ll also tell you, when the Imperial SFMTA tried to impose SFPark on the Mission Bay and the Dogpatch and whatnot, their first attempt, which involved months of planning, failed. The SFMTA was highly embarrassed but they knew that it’s their job to impose SFPark, or whatever they’re calling it now, on the area. The college boys of the SFMTA just know, they just know it, that it’s their job to increase the power of the SFMTA and have the SFMTA grow and grow and grow.

Get all the deets on the Second Invasion of Mission Bay right here, and below.

And oh, here’s SFPark.info website, written by people who don’t approve of the worst aspects of the SFMTA and SFPark (or whatever they’re calling it these days.)

All right, now back to the official stuff. Uh, and in case you don’t know it, SFMTA, you suck – more proof of this is that your website has “insecure content.” [UPDATE: Good job, MUNI! You took care of that. Someday, you'll get the hang of the whole "Internet" thing.]

Or so they say:

In closing, MUNI sucks!

“Mission Bay parking planning community meeting – Saturday, June 16

Posted on 05.25.12 in AnnouncementsParking Planning|Share:Bookmark and Share

The public is invited to join the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (SFMTA) at our second Mission Bay parking planning community meeting. We will discuss the revised plans for parking management in the neighborhood and gather public input. As Mission Bay evolves, we need to ensure that everyone on the road—cars, buses, bicycles, and pedestrians—can travel safely and smoothly.

Mission Bay parking planning community meeting 
Mission Creek Park Pavilion, 290 Channel Street, one block west of 4th and Channel Streets
Saturday, June 16
3-3:30 p.m. – Open House
3:30-4:30 p.m. – Public Comments (sign up by 3:20 p.m.)

The SFMTA seeks public input on the following:

  • Special event pricing to better manage parking demand during large events like Giants games and reduce congestion.
  • Extended meter hours to open up evening parking, particularly during evening games. This is separate from the SFMTA’s citywide Sunday metering proposal.
  • New meter installation schedule for meters approved in 2002, which will have SFpark demand-responsive pricing to ensure an optimum level of open parking spaces as Mission Bay grows.

During the open house section of the meeting, attendees can review plan details, talk directly with project planners, and submit written feedback. The public comment period follows.

CLICK HERE to learn more about Mission Bay parking planning
CLICK HERE for directions to the meeting venue, including nearby public transit

Please feel free to email us if you have any questions about the location or the project.

You can also stay up to date via Twitter and Facebook.”

Federal Workers Elect to Not Participate in San Francisco’s New “Market Pricing” Parking Scheme

Monday, April 16th, 2012

See? The Feds park at meters all the live-long day, but they never pay nothing.

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Oh well.