Posts Tagged ‘shanghai’

San Francisco’s TIZEN Developer Conference 2014 Ends – Here’s the Wrap-Up

Thursday, June 5th, 2014

It’s a wrap, deets below.

Some photos of the second day are here.

“Tizen Developer Conference Culminates With Introduction of New Devices, Device Profiles, Developer Tools and Internet of Things Roadmap

Capacity Number of Attendees Witness the Unveiling of the World’s First Tizen Smartphone, New Tizen IVI System and Tizen Smart Television SDK

SAN FRANCISCO, June 5, 2014 — The Tizen Developer Conference (#TDCSF14), the world’s largest event focused exclusively on the growing developer ecosystem around the Tizen open source operating system for converged devices, today marked the closing of the third-annual TDC event in San Francisco. The event saw a record number of developers and media attendees witness the official unveiling of the world’s first Tizen smartphone, the Samsung Z, set to launch in Q3 of 2014 in Russia. A number of other new device prototypes, software, device profiles and developer tools were also on display at the event.

Highlights included:

(more…)

American Hustle, Shanghai Surprise: If You Conspire to Spy for China, the FBI Will Make a Movie About You: “Game of Pawns”

Tuesday, April 15th, 2014

This is the tale of  Glenn Duffie Shriver, badly told:

Thanks, FBI.

I guess.

Here’s What Our Massive “Left Coast Lifter” Barge Crane is Doing These Days: Nothing – Soon, Off to NYC?

Tuesday, November 26th, 2013

Could be:

“The massive crane is expected to be used during construction of the New Tappan Zee Bridge, a replacement for the Tappan Zee Bridge across the Hudson River in New York State by Tappan Zee Constructors, a consortium of companies that includes American Bridge Company.”

As she appeared last week:

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Shanghai Metro, the MUNI of the Largest City in the World, Tells Women to Dress Primly – Protest Ensues

Monday, July 2nd, 2012

First of all, MUNI* sucks, let’s just get that out of the way.

Second of all, look what happened when Shanghai Metro over there in the People’s Republic of China used its Tumblrish/Twtterish microblogging website to lecture women about how to dress, you know, to decrease the chances of getting groped and whatnot.

See? It’s all:

“乘坐地铁,穿成这样,不被骚扰,才怪。地铁狼较多,打不胜打,人狼大战,姑娘,请自重啊!”

Now it’s been a while since my days at Hereford, but I think that means:

“Subway, dressed like that, and not be harassed, strange. More subway wolf, playing numerous fight the war of crying wolf, girl, please behave!”

Get it? If you dress like a ho, you’ll get treated like one, by the subway wolves.

And here’s the photo that Shanghai’s subway agency grabbed to make its point:

But now there’s a quiet protest going on.

Like right here.

Like people are wearing burkas to say, “What do you want to do, impose Sharia Law?”

What a burn.

I’ll tell you, one thing the Red Chinese hate, just hate, is underground protest movements. They can’t abide.

Like remember this one from a few years ago? It seems that a group of people wanted to Stop the Killing in Tibet so they had this gal suspend herself from the Chinese Consulate right there at Geary and Laguna.

Thusly:

Man, the people inside the consulate went berserk over this one. They ended up going to the roof to cut her down. (Lucky for her she was just 15 feet above a balcony – if she had fallen to the sidewalk below, it could have been fatal.) And then they blocked the SFFD from taking her to SF General to get her leg injuries treated. (You know, back then, the PRC was kind of a pariah nation.)

Anywho, my point is that the Chinese Communist Party can’t abide** protest, even little ones about proper dress codes, so it will be interesting to see what happens when Democracy finally finds its way to China. Perhaps the CCP would end up the winner in a fair election. Who knows.

But little things, like “underground” performance art protests, have a tendency to turn into bigger things.

Sometimes.

We’ll see.

*I mean I don’t think you should ever broach the topic of the SFMTAMUNIDPT without saying up front that MUNI sucks, that MUNI has lots and lots of room for improvement. This kind of constructive criticism displays the fact that you don’t think that MUNI is the Best Darn Agency in the World or something like that. So you could say, “Of course MUNI sucks, but I think that we should keep on building that horrible Central Subway.” That would be interesting, huh? That would show at least that you acknowledge reality and also that you feel that paying the Feds back their $200,000,000 or so would be a burden on the City and County. And then somebody else might counter with, “Yeah, we should make a deal with the Feds not to spend good money after bad  - maybe  let’s just forget the whole thing and let’s not require repayment of the money back to the US Treasury. That would be a win-win for San Francisco and all the taxpayers of America.” Or something like that.  Now you’re on the trolley!

**Hey, now let’s hear from Mayor Ed Lee “advisor” / Chinese Consulate “advisor” Chinatown “Power Broker” Rose Pak, you know, from back in the day, after she descended from her taxpayer-financed, below-market condo penthouse in District Six:

“When asked what message she would like to convey to the Chinese government, Pak said, ‘On what moral ground do we have as United States citizens lecturing what China should do when our own President would drum up falsehoods and bomb Iraq back to the stone-age, killing several hundred thousand innocent Iraqis. Look at all the problems in the world, (they) are all created by Western countries with their phony-baloney moral standards,’ Pak added.”

The Giant “Left Coast Lifter” Floating Crane was 100% Made in China, So That’s Why It’s Painted Red, White, and Blue

Tuesday, August 30th, 2011

This thing is straight outta Shanghai, People’s Republic of China, but it’s the biggest red-white-and-blue whatever that you’ll ever see:

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These days it’s just hanging out in the East Bay, looking for work, as many others are.

When will it be moved, when will it get used again?

Nobody knows…

Giant Buddha of Civic Center Not So Tough After All – Loses a Head and a Couple of Its Arms

Thursday, February 17th, 2011

Seeing how it was built makes me feel it has less power now, like it has less control over me. In my daily nightmares it usually has a solid core of molybdenum or that Terminator II kind of metal. And sometimes, on a few nights, the good ones, it’s creamy nougat.

Mmmmmm, nougat.

But, as you can see, it’s mostly just air in there, it’s not solid at all:

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You Maniacs! You blew it up! Ah, bless you! God bless you all to Heaven!

And Steve Rhodes has the video of an arm disassembly. (Not so tough now, are you, Buddha?)

Word From the Asian Art Museum in Civic Center: “We Will Keep Our Doors Open and Maintain Operations”

Friday, November 19th, 2010

Well, I guess there’ll be no bailout from local billionaire and Asian Art Nut Larry Ellison anytime soon, but, no matter, it will carry on despite recent financial issues.

Now, for some reason, San Francisco went all out this year for the City of Shanghai and its World Expo. So, the AAA deserves credit for that when the City considers related matters in the future. (I mean, your World Expos, your America’s Cups, your Olympics, they mostly lose money right? They’re mostly a bad thing for the hosting cities and regions but mostly a good think for the politicians who make the deals and “win” the right to host whatever. Of course, I’m generally skeptical of those who want to take The People’s land, money, opportunities, whatever to pay for some extended party for the greater glory of a few electeds. Anyway…)

A nice ambiance just off Larkin Street, non?

Here’s the news:

“Asian Art Museum Open for Business

SAN FRANCISCO, November 18, 2010- San Francisco’s Asian Art Museum will keep its doors open and maintain operations despite financial challenges faced by the Asian Art Museum’s Foundation, which is the private fundraising arm of the Museum.

“The Museum is fortunate to have the support of donors from around the world. Donations from individuals, the Museum’s board, and our corporate and Foundation partners remain strong” said Jay Xu, director of the Asian Art Museum. “I want to assure the Museum’s visitors, our 17,000 members, and all of our donors and hundreds of volunteers that the Museum will continue to be a leading center for Asian learning in the future.”

While the City solely owns the Museum’s building and its collections, the City and the Foundation jointly fund the Museum’s staff, facilities, and operations.

The Museum continues to maintain its role as a vital source of Asian art and culture, averaging nearly 300,000 visitors per year. Like many other cultural organizations in California and across the United States, the Foundation is facing challenges stemming from the economic downturn and related market disruptions. The Foundation is attempting to renegotiate its debt financing with its principal creditors.  As a measure of prudent management of fiscal responsibility, the Foundation has engaged outside professionals, and, with City officials, has begun to work on these negotiations.

“While this has been a difficult situation, it will have no impact on the Museum’s core operations,” said Tony Sun, chair of the Asian Art Commission and Asian Art Museum Foundation, the Museum’s dual governing boards.

The Museum looks forward to welcoming visitors to its current critically acclaimed exhibition, Beyond Golden Clouds; Five Centuries of Japanese Screens, on view through January 16, 2011, as well as the upcoming major exhibitions Bali: Art, Ritual, Performance, on view February 25 through September 11, 2011, and Maharaja: The Splendor of India’s Royal Courts, on view Oct 21, 2011, through April 8, 2012.

About the Asian Art Museum
The Asian Art Museum is a public institution whose mission is to lead a diverse global audience in discovering the unique material, aesthetic, and intellectual achievements of Asian art and culture. Holding more than 17,000 Asian art treasures spanning 6,000 years of history, the Museum is one of the largest museums in the Western world devoted exclusively to Asian art.

Information: (415) 581-3500
or www.asianart.org
Location: 200 Larkin Street, San Francisco, CA 94102″

Ten-Foot Tall Cyclone Fence Keeps the Great Buddha of Civic Center Safe from Giants Fans and Vandalizers

Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010

Thank Gaia that Rec and Park is keeping our Giant Buddha safe from the madding crowd today:

See the fence? It should come down by tomorrow, November 4th, after the crowd has left:

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UPDATE: Oh no, blogged too soon! Appears as if some fans managed to get a better vantage point, at the risk of enraging Gaia, the Earth Goddess:

See Comments.

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Our Graffitoed Giant Buddha in Civic Center Got All Cleaned Up Yesterday

Friday, June 25th, 2010

Remember back earlier this month when people promoting Kodak’s version of a Flip camera thought it was all viral to vandalise the giant 15-ton Buddha down in Civic Center? Well, the sculpture is all cleaned up now. Let’s take a look.

Here’s a screen grab from the now-censored Kodak viral marketing video. (You can still see the shorter, censored 4:13 version here.) 

Click to expand.

No attempt was made to clean things up for a while so here’s the way it looked when I was taking some girl to the Costco on Wednesday:

See? (There was other graffiti elsewhere of course.)

Well, check it, it’s all cleaned up now. They must have done this Thursday A.M. As it looks today:

Sacrilege never looked so good.

I’m calling this an A-one clean-up job.

San Francisco’s Official 2010 Chinese Junket “Gift of Travel” Disclosure in PDF

Wednesday, June 23rd, 2010

As promised, here it is:

20100616_20100616_3.216d_newsom_gavin_redacted

That should answer any question that you might have about what to give the millionaire who already has everything. Give him/her the “Gift of Travel.”

You should do that particularly if you’re trying to profit off of the two-decade delay in fixing damage to the Bay Bridge from the Loma Prieta earthquake.

Oh well.