Posts Tagged ‘shelter’

Interpreting MUNI Hieroglyphics: 43 + 54 + 69 = You’re Going To Be Late, Again, Again, Again

Monday, May 19th, 2014

Let’s see here:

43 Masonic;

54 minutes ’til the next bus; and

69* minutes ’til the bus after that

Click to expand

What’s that, MUNI, you want more money?

But every other transit system in the world does more with less…

* Heh. Your algorithm should prolly round 69 minutes either down to 68 or up to 70, MUNI.**  I mean, you don’t see CA license plates saying 4SEX397 or anything, do you? There’s a reason for that.

**Yes, all caps even tho it’s not an acronym. It’s easy for readers to understand and it matches your iconic snake logo, MUNI, that’s why.

Twitterloin Trilogy: The “Safe Havens” of District Six – 52 Places in the Tenderloin Where the Endangered Can Flee

Friday, April 15th, 2011

I think.

Per the Street Sheet:

Safe Havens include 52 businesses, nonprofits and residential hotels, spanning from O’Farrell Street to Sixth and Howard streets. Each site is identified by a neon-green sign depicting a a pair of hands sheltering figures of a man, woman, child and a wheelchair-bound person. The Safe Havens are also places where the endangered may stay up to 15 minutes and make a phone call, if necessary, until the emergency subsides.”

Can you see the neon-green sign in the window at 1000 Market?

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The website’s now gone (a movie company bought it?), but SafeHavenSF had a vision statement ‘n stuff:

“The Safe Haven Vision Statement

We start from a standpoint that everyone deserves to walk the streets in safety. Safe Havens are rooted in the idea that it takes an entire community to increase the peace in our neighborhood. This means involving everyone in the solutions to the problems we face. We reject scapegoating and racial profiling. We reach out to working-families, seniors, small-business people, immigrants, straight and queer folks, service providers, housed and homeless people, those struggling with addictions, and youth. We understand that people who have at times in their lives participated in activities that have harmed the community can also play a role in improving it. The problems we face in the Central City area weren’t started by any single group, so they can’t be solved by a single group either. We organize for solutions that are effective, socially just, and provide alternatives to the endless cycles of violence and incarceration.”

And here’s an old map:

Locations (Refer to Map above):
1
Gene Friend Recreation Center 270 6th Street
2
City Produce 174 6th street

3
San Cristina Hotel 1000 Market
4
Ambassador Hotel 50 Mason
5
TNDC admin office (201 Eddy) 201 Eddy St.
6
TNDC admin office (215 Taylor) 215 Taylor
7
Youth With a Mission 357 Ellis St.
8
Downtown Grocery 289 Eddy St.
9
201 Turk Street Apartments 201 Turk St.
10
TL Community Benefit District 118 Jones St.
11
Boys and Girls Club 115 Jones St.

12
St. Boniface Church 133 Golden Gate Avenue
13
Art Studio/CCHH 146 Leavenworth Street
13
CCHH Men’s Shelter 146 Leavenworth Street

14
Shi-yu Lang YMCA – youth deparment 220 Golden Gate Avenue

15
Hospitality House 290 Turk St.
16
Empire Market 399 Eddy St.
17
Senator Hotel 519 Ellis St.
18
Wild Awakenings Café 142 Mc Allister Street

19
Morty’s Deli 280 Golden Gate Ave
20
Central City SRO Collaborative 259 Hyde St.
21
Coalition On Homelessness 468 Turk St.
22
Iroquois Hotel 835 O’ Farrell Street
www.sfsafehaven.org

Stay safe!

Yahoo’s Bus Stop Derby – Are they Really Hanging Giant Flat Panel TV’s on the Sides of 20 MUNI Bus Stops?

Wednesday, November 24th, 2010

I don’t know, maybe you can leave old-school CRT-TV’s on the sidewalks of San Francisco and have them stick around, but I’m not sure if I’d leave a 72-inch touch-sensitive flat panel screens on the streets 24-7. I mean, I wouldn’t expect to get them all back intact.

But no matter, Yahoo! has its Bus Stop Derby game up and running.

See how it works right here.

And here’s a still photo from Steve Rhodes:

But what will happen when your neighborhood wins and the O.K. Go puts on a concert as your reward? Won’t your area NIMBY’s be all “nobody told us about this?”

Oh well.

Let’s let Yahoo! ‘splain what’s up with the BSD:

“The short answer is it’s a two-month citywide challenge that turns bus stops into social gaming hubs.

An even shorter answer is it’s something that makes waiting for the bus fun.

Most of us don’t really love our daily commute. And even though you soon recognize the same faces that get on the same bus at the same time every morning, it’s pretty rare that we talk to each other. We thought we could make public transport a little more fun.

So we put up 20 Bus Stop Derby bus stops with interactive 72-inch touch screens. We developed four addictive games that you can play right then and there while waiting for your bus—and since it’s even more fun to play together (and especially to beat someone), you can challenge players at other Derby stops to live head-to-head games. And you aren’t just playing for personal glory, you’re playing for your neighborhood.

The Bus Stop Derby pits 20 teams (20 San Francisco neighborhoods) against each other. So choose your neighborhood, rally your fellow commuters, and go break some high scores!  The grand prize is a concert with OK Go that takes place in the neighborhood that wins the Derby. Have fun, and may the best neighborhood win!”

“Riders waiting for Muni buses at select stops in downtown will be passing the time playing video games, as well as the opportunity to win a concert by OK Go. The devices are being installed by tech giant Yahoo!.” From the San Francisco Examiner, click here for the full story.

“Yahoo’s involvement was the most interesting to me….is clearly a sign the company is still actively pursuing new and exciting opportunities.”From DailyDOOH , Click here for the full story.

“Games are the most popular type of mobile app, and to promote its own mail and other apps, Yahoo is putting a twist on mobile games.” From ClickZ, click here for the full story.

“Resembling giant iPhones (but 20x the size), these 72″ touch screens have been installed at bus stops in 20 different neighborhoods so that bored commuters waiting [for] the bus can play games and earn points for their neighborhood.” From Muni Diaries, click here for the full story.

“20 Muni bus shelters in San Francisco are getting a high tech makeover for two months as part of a the Yahoo Bus Stop Derby - a giant neighborhood vs. neighborhood challenge that ends with a huge free concert put on by Yahoo.” From Fun Cheap San Francisco, click here for the full story.

“Transit ads drive commuters to get their game on the go, vie for an OK Go block party.” From Yahoo! Advertising Blog, click here for the full story.

MUNI Giveth, and MUNI Taketh Away – New Spruced Up Stops on the 21 Hayes Line

Monday, December 7th, 2009

Until recently, there were two bus stops on the same side of this short block of Hayes Street near Masonic. See?

But a few of the stops had to go away to comply with the new changes that came about on December 6, 2009.

The remaining stops got a bit of sprucing up last week, with red paint and what not:

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Click to expand.

Of course there’s no shelter to replace the ones that got taken away, but you can’t have everything in Life, right? You can’t expect a minor bus line to have four stops just for itself within a 200 foot radius forever, right?

Hurray.

Today is the the Day MUNI is Eliminating Bus Stops on the 21 Hayes Bus Line

Thursday, November 19th, 2009

They call it Bus Stop Consolidation and it’s happening right now this morning on the #21 Hayes line. A crew comes along and the next thing you know, your favorite bus shelter is rolling down the street and into oblivion.

But amazingly, this block will still have one stop left (after losing two!) and then there are other stops close by. It’s sort of ridiculous to have one or two (on the same side of the street!) stops on every block, right?

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Click to expand

Hurray!

Thanks, MUNI. (Seriously.)

San Francisco’s “Tuesday Noon Siren” Tests are Loudest in Chinatown

Saturday, August 22nd, 2009

You can set your watch every Tuesday at 12:00 PM in the City and County of San Francisco if you can hear the Tuesday Noon Siren Test.

In some other places it’s a little hard to notice, but these horns above Kearny and Washington must be the loudest in all Christendom.

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See?

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If this had been an actual emergency, a voice would have told you what’s up. Or, generally speaking, you might want to just hustle inside as soon as you figure out it’s not a test this time.

Read all about it:

The Tuesday Noon Siren

Every Tuesday at noon, San Francisco tests the Outdoor Warning System. During the test the siren emits a 15 second alert tone. In an actual emergency, the siren tone will cycle repeatedly for 5 minutes. Should you hear the sirens at any time other than Tuesday at noon, go indoors and immediately tune to a news source such as KCBS 740 AM, or other local media stations.

Learn more about the siren system at www.72hours.org, the San Francisco Office of Emergency Services & Homeland Security’s new website. Here you’ll find information on how to respond to specific types of emergencies, such as an Earthquake or a Tsunami, and easy steps to help you develop your own emergency plan.

In a major disaster it might be 3 days before vital services are restored.
When you hear the Tuesday Noon Siren, it’s your weekly reminder to make an emergency plan, build an emergency supply kit and be prepared to be self sufficient for 72 hours.