Posts Tagged ‘slate’

The Mistakes of San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee – Chapter One: Calling the Hetch Hetchy Valley Restoration Concept “Insane”

Friday, October 26th, 2012

Here it is, in the national media, in the Washington Post’s blog site, for tout le monde to see:

San Francisco’s Spectacular Hypocrisy

That bit from Amy Crawford has this nice quote about Proposition F (2012) from error-prone San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee:

“As insane as this is, it is, in fact, insane,” sputtered the usually mild-mannered Mayor Ed Lee when the initiative was announced.

Now, was it a mistake for San Francisco’s so-called Consensus Mayor to label Prop F (and, indirectly, the supporters of Prop F) as insane?

Yes. It’s not what he meant to say, it’s not what he actually thinks.

Now it certainly would be inconvenient for San Francisco to lose control of Hetch Hetchy, no argument there.

But IRL, it’s not “insane” to think that maybe, just maybe, it’d be a good idea to restore Hetchy Hetchy at some far off point in the future.

The Valley, the “counterpoint” to Yosemite, before San Francisco improperly grabbed it:

And I can see those waterfalls

And I can see those waterfalls

Click to become as “insane” as the half of San Francisco voters what are going to say “Yes” to Prop F (2012) come November.

Slate.Com Wrote About San Francisco and Yelp and Cities.Data.Gov Today – But What Does It Mean?

Wednesday, September 5th, 2012

Take a look here:

The Most Important Information Missing From Yelp – Crowdsourcing sites and local government should pool their data to better inform consumers.”

Let’s check it:

“Last month, four major cities—San Francisco, New York City, Chicago, and Seattle—put statistics on things like crime reports, restaurant ratings, bed bug complaints, and public restroom locations online at cities.data.gov.”

So can we easily look up info about bed bugs in San Francisco on this newish website?

Nope!

Also:

“…a major frustration in urban centers is the amount of time spent trying to find a parking spot. To address this problem and improve air quality, San Francisco launched SFPark…”

So has SFPark reduced the amount of time spent trying to find a parking spot?

Nope!

And has SFPark improved air quality?

Nope!

SFPark is all about getting more money to the SFMTA, IRL.

Continuing:

“…consider the Bike Accident Tracker, a tool created by the Bay Citizen that mapped all reported bicycling accidents in San Francisco over a five-year period. On the map, the intersection of Market and Castro was identified as a hot spot…”

Uh, I think we kind of already knew about hot spots as the MSM regularly reports on them and it’s been doing that for donkey’s years.

Continuing:

” Just this past April a cyclist hit and killed a pedestrian at that same intersection, according the San Francisco Chronicle. If accident data were integrated with a site like Google Maps, making the critical information more easily available, is it possible that the deadly accident at Market and Castro could have been avoided? I’m not sure, but it’s worth looking into.”

Cyclist Chris Bucchere really, really liked Strava.com, and he really liked going fast downhill in urban areas, and he actually raised the idea of Strava segment “winners” (so-called “Kings of the Mountain”) “winning” coffee as an incentive/reward just a few days before the death of Sutchi Hui. I’m totally baffled how hot spot data dissemination would have affected anything.

All right, well that’s the first webpage of the article by Alissa Black (an ASU student?). I think I’ll stop here.

Uh, the reason why data about which hotels have bed bugs isn’t more widely disseminated is because the hotel industry doesn’t like that kind of thing.

And the reason why people walking into San Francisco restaurants don’t see a letter grade displayed out front is because the Golden Gate Restaurant Association doesn’t  want that kind of thing.

I don’t think the writer of the linked bit above understands how SF works.

JMO.

San Francisco’s Sunset District Gets Called “Land of Misery” in National Media: “Fog – Thick, Endless, Depressive Clouds”

Friday, February 24th, 2012

Cover your eyes, avert your gaze, West Bay realtors:

“If you start at the Bay Bridge and head west along most major streets in San Francisco, you’ll eventually get to a magical land of misery known as the Sunset. The name is a joke, and perhaps even a way to trick tourists: The sun rarely visits the Sunset, not even when it sets. The primary weather element in the Sunset is fog—thick, endless, depressive clouds of it that wash up from the ocean to completely saturate the land. I lived in the Sunset for a single, terrible year. Before I moved there, I used to be one of those snobby city-dwellers who’d look down on suburbanites who couldn’t handle San Francisco’s famously capricious climate. I’d heard the Sunset’s weather wasn’t great, but hey, how bad could it be?

It was bad. Too bad for me; after our lease was up, my wife and I moved to the suburbs. Looking back, what bothered me most wasn’t the terrible climate—though I did hate it—but the vast difference between the Sunset’s weather and the weather everywhere else. Whatever meteorological patterns applied in normal parts of San Francisco didn’t seem to apply to the Sunset, which meant that forecasts for the city held no sway there. If the weatherman said it was going to be 80 and sunny, it was probably 55 and cloudy at my house.

Wow, harsh.

Of course, former Supervisor Ed Jew famously claimed to live in the Sunset, but instead of actually doing that he preferred to risk jail, which is where he’s at right now. Oh well.

What a great place for a high-cost, low-productivity photovoltaic power plant using panels costing many times more than the going market rate. Oh well: 

Click to expand

But it could be worse. The writer could have started talking about the “houses” of the Sunset District. Here they are, in no particular order:

Halfway houses

Cat houses

Grow houses

Oh well.

Keep on keeping on, Sunset District.

Famous Phil Bronstein, Michael Kinsley, Steve Coll ask “What Comes After Newspapers?”

Wednesday, May 6th, 2009

Publicity-shy San Francisco Chronicle/Hearst Communications editor-at-large Phil BronsteinThe One responsible for our nation’s recent newspaper upheaval, is not one to blow his own horn. You see he’s too polite too mention it, but he will be the star at tomorrow’s “What Comes After Newspapers?” panel at Fort Mason tomorrow night.

This free event is being put on by Zócalo Public Square, the people who just brought you Craigslist Founder Craig Newmark (another purported Killer of Newspapers.)

Get the deets below:

The answer is out there, Phil, and it’s looking for you, and it will find you if you want it to.

It appears there are a few seats left. You should get over there and try to ask them about Rupert Murdoch’s great idea.

Zócalo in San Francisco
What Comes After Newspapers?
  

A Zócalo/New America Foundation Event

Moderated by David Folkenflik, media correspondent, National Public Radio

Thursday, May 07, 2009, 7:30 pm

Fort Mason Center
Golden Gate Room at the Conference Center, Building A
San Francisco, CA 94123

From town tabloids to major metropolitan dailies, newspapers seem to be in their last throes. The availability of free and instant news online, the high profit margins demanded by media conglomerates, and the steep declines in advertising revenue have hit newspapers hard. They have been forced to lay off employees, trim their pages, close print operations or–as The Hearst Corp. has threatened to do to the San Francisco Chronicle–shut down completely. Will a new model or medium rise to do what newspapers have aimed to do for over a century–pursue accuracy and objectivity, doggedly investigate stories, act as a check on power, embody a community’s conversation with itself, and write a first draft of history? Or will the demise of newspapers mean a radical shift in what we know and how we know it? Zócalo hosts a panel–including former Washington Post managing editor Steve Coll, Slate founder Michael Kinsley, and former San Francisco Chronicle executive vice president and editor Phil Bronstein–to discuss the decline of print media and the future of journalism.

The New America Foundation is a nonprofit, nonpartisan public policy institute based in Washington, D.C. For more information, click www.newamerica.net.