Posts Tagged ‘sobi’

Why You SHOULDN’T Read Your JUMP! Bike Rental Agreement – Hey, Can you Ride in the Fog? NO! – What If You Weigh Over 210 Pounds? NO!

Friday, March 9th, 2018

Well, here it is, just a part, one screens-worth, of your JUMP! bikeshare rental agreement, as approved by our SFMTA:


Noting just three items here – these are things that popped out at me when I looked up the insane MEDIA RELEASE clause – this is what I saw on my screen, and I didn’t go poking around the rest of this document as I had had my fill:

  1. A 210 pound weight limit. This seems low to me, as someone who’s six foot one/ and tons of fun.
  2. You can’t ride these bikes in the fucking fog? Srsly, in Frisco?
  3. And who the Hell negotiated the MEDIA RELEASE on your behalf, Gentle Rider?

So that’s why I say to not read the agreement – ’cause you prolly won’t like what’s in there and, you know, these issues most likely won’t come up unless you’re in a big accident or something.

Anyway, read and weep:

“(h) Restricted Uses. You shall not do any of the following acts (“Restricted Uses”):

  • Use any Bicycle if You are younger than 18 years of age.
  • Use any Bicycle if You exceed the maximum weight limit (210 pounds) of the Bicycle.
  • Use any Bicycle if You have any existing physical or mental condition that would prohibit You from safely operating the Bicycle.
  • Operate a Bicycle while carrying any item that impedes Your ability to safely operate the Bicycle.
  • Operate a Bicycle while under the influence of alcohol, drugs, or any other substance that impairs Your ability to safely operate the Bicycle.
  • Use any cell phone or mobile electronic device for any use that distracts You from the safe operation of the Bicycle, including but not limited to phone calls, text messages, or music.
  • Allow any other person to use the Bicycle or allow more than one person to be carried on the Bicycle.
  • Overfill the Bicycle basket or place objects weighing in total more 20 pounds in the Bicycle basket.
  • Violate any applicable federal, state, or local law or regulation.
  • Operate or use a Bicycle in any manner during adverse weather conditions, including but not limited to hail, dust storms, fog, heavy rains, or lightning storms.
  • Ride or operate a Bicycle that has any defect, fails to operate as a properly functioning Bicycle, or that is in need of repair.
  • Use the Bicycle if it, or any component of it, appears to be or becomes defective or malfunctions.
  • Use the Bicycle for racing, tricks, jumping, stunt riding, off-road riding, or in any other hazardous manner.
  • Use the Bicycle for any commercial purposes.
  • Tow, pull, carry, or push any person or object with a Bicycle.
  • Remove, dismantle, write on, deface, misuse, or modify any accessories, parts, or components of any Bicycle.


We reserve the right to photograph and record You using the Bicycle(s). You hereby give Us the right to use Your image and likeness (including caricature), and any reproduction or simulation thereof, in any media now known or hereafter developed, both during and after the term of this Agreement, for whatever the purposes We deem necessary or desirable. You hereby waive any right to royalties or other compensation arising from or related to any such use by Us or related entities.”

Either Ford Rejected Palo Alto or Vice Versa – GoBike Rental Service Cancelled in PA – City is on “a New and Better Path”

Tuesday, October 31st, 2017

Ouch. This is how it was supposed to be, down StanFORD way:

Palo Alto expands bike share system with Ford’s help

But TWTATIN, see? Here’s the reason why Ford Motor Company ads won’t be rolling all over PA:

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So, not only will Palo Alto’s “bikeshare” rentals not have giant FORD logos on them, Palo Altons will have a newer and better program. Sounds like a win-win, considering all the baggage that comes with making a deal with FoMoCo.

Wonder if Ford Motor’s vaunted GoBike rental program will end up as three islands – SF, SJ and East Bay? (Of course, these blue bikes will continue to travel across bridges and tunnels from county to county, but that’s not allowed, you know, per se.)

(And as far as Frisco is concerned, it seems Ford is having trouble installing stations west of Masonic. Some neighbors are up in arms, mostly over the loss of parking spaces, and they hold a lot of sway in this town. Anyway, planned stations that were already supposed to be a done deal in the Upper Haight and on Hayes have stalled, and some Ford’s already given up on.)

Anyway, Ford and Palo Alto will always have the Ford Research and Innovation Center on Hillview.

Or not, either way.

I’m not sure how much the bay area needs Ford anyway…


This Harmless Rental Bike Locked Up on Market is Seen as a HUGE THREAT by Ford Motor Company – A Dubious Public Private Partnership

Thursday, August 24th, 2017

A JUMP bike seen a few days back:

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So, let’s say you want to compete with Ford Motor Company’s high cost GoBike service. You could offer to buy up some parking spaces from the SFMTA and you know, plan out how big your concomitant billboards will be, but uh oh, FoMoCo occupies the field with an exclusive agreement signed by SFGov.

Oh, well, then go “stationless,” how about that?

But uh oh, SFGov has crafted the most restrictive rules possible. Check it – STATIONLESS BIKESHARE PROGRAM – PERMIT APPLICATION

So hey, who do you think just loves this massive Barrier To Entry? Ford Motor Company. Hey, whose representatives so much as said this at meetings ‘n stuff? Ford Motor Company’s


Hey, is this orange-red bike “better” than a Ford Motor Company GoBike?

Hell yes.

And is it cheaper?

Well, pretty much.

Anyway, my points are that This Harmless Rental Bike Locked Up on Market is Seen as a HUGE THREAT by Ford Motor Company AND that this whole, expensive seven-year deal is A Dubious Public/Private Partnership.

New-School “Bike-Share” Style Electric Rental Bikes Already Tagged, Even During the Testing Phase

Tuesday, July 25th, 2017

This photo pays off the headline, so no further elucidation is needed, I don’t think. As seen ‘neath a giant street art rat on Haight:

IMG_7339 copy

Seems Ford Motor Company thinks it bought quite a bit for its $49 million dollars, including buying a kind of monopoly on bike-share bicycle rental? You tell me. It’s certainly not saying Let A Thousand Flowers Bloom, let’s bring more bikes to Frisco, oh no. That’s Ford Go-Bike for you.

Maybe Ford is worse than the taggers of the 94117, IDK.

Mommy, what’s FordPass?

These technologies cannot be deactivated in FordPass and do not respond to “Do-Not-Track” requests.

If you object to any changes to FordPass or to these Terms, your sole recourse is to stop using FordPass.

Further deets on this Brave New World of GoBike, in the Year Of Our Ford 1:

“Information We Collect. We collect the following types of information through your use of FordPass or third-party services that integrate with FordPass, such as Ford GoBike, which we also may combine with other information you have previously provided, or that we have collected from other sources:

  • Information you provide to create an account or sign-in to an existing account, such as name, email address, street address, telephone number, credit card, and Vehicle Identification Number (VIN). You must have an account to use FordPass.
  • Information we collect through FordPass includes:
    • Location information collected from your mobile device and/or vehicle, such as Global Positioning System (GPS) and location derived from IP address, which can be used to determine your device or vehicle’s current location, travel direction, and speed.
    • Mobile Device Information, such as software or operating system version, unique device identifiers, IP address, mobile network information, and mobile phone number.
    • Vehicle Information, such as the VIN, hardware model and part numbers, status of vehicle systems (e.g., fluid levels, tire pressure, and locks), vehicle diagnostics, odometer, and other information about how the vehicle is performing.
    • Driving Characteristics, such as speed, use of accelerator, brakes, steering, seat belts, and other similar information about how the vehicle is used.
  • Information about how you use FordPass or third-party services that integrate with FordPass, such as when and for how long you use features and when you contact us, a record of your communication.
  • FordPass may also contain online tracking technologies (e.g. Adobe Analytics and Aptelligent) on your mobile device that collect non-personal information about how FordPass is used and how it is performing including if it crashes, and which may be able to be connected across devices and over time. These technologies cannot be deactivated in FordPass and do not respond to “Do-Not-Track” requests.

How We Use Information We Collect: We use your personal information – information that reasonably identifies you – to provide you with great functionality and services, allow you to control certain vehicle features, fulfill requests you’ve made in FordPass, personalize your experience, troubleshoot problems, develop new and improved products, services, and marketing strategies and research, to protect safety, property, privacy, and security, or to comply with legal requirements. WE MAY send communications about products, services, offers, promotions, news, and more that are customized based on your personal information, including your location, speed, and driving characteristics. You may choose not to provide certain personal information (such as not entering a VIN to connect to your vehicle or not entering a credit card to use My Wallet services), but this may limit or prevent use of certain features. We may use and share non-personal information for any purpose.

Surprise! San Francisco Already Has an Operational Bike Share Program – Meet “SFO FlyCycle SoBi”

Friday, April 5th, 2013

It’s new. It’s the SFO FlyCycle SoBi program from Social Bicycles.

Here are some of the bikes parked at SFO these days…

…and here is a short video explaining the program. Note the drive shaft instead of a chain:

I’ll tell you, what Social Bicycles calls a headlight and a taillight aren’t all that bright.

And I’ll tell you, the helmet issue goes unaddressed.

And I’ll tell you, the reservation system looks cumbersome / unnecessary.

And how much this program costs us and how much it gets used, that’s also a mystery.

These bikes would get thrashed in San Francisco proper, say parked at 6th and Market, but they appear to be pretty safe in the San Francisco part of San Mateo County.


Meet the Team:

Ryan Rzepecki, CEO

Photo of Ryan Rzepecki

Ryan has a B.S. in Marketing from Penn State University and a Masters in Urban Planning from Hunter College. The bicycle has been his primary mode of transportation for the last four years, and bicycle advocacy has been both his passion and profession. Prior to developing SoBi, Ryan worked for the NYC Department of Transportation in the bicycle program. At the DOT, he sited bike racks, edited the bike map, conducted field research on bike facilities, and organized cycling promotions.

Nick Foley, Product Design

Photo of Nick Foley

Nick is a designer and bike mechanic who loves how bicycles make life more efficient. He studied industrial design at Pratt Institute where he experimented with bicycles that were optimized for ‘non-cyclist’ commuters. Nick gets excited about using design to make urban infrastructure more sustainable, and creating objects that return a sense of wonder to everyday activities.

Marcin Pyla, Software Development

Photo of Marcin Pyla

Marcin has 10 years of experience building websites, applications, and start-ups. He is currently founder and CEO of Leftbrain where he manages the 5 developers working for Social Bicycles. He oversees all software development including embedded Linux, Ruby on Rails, iOS, and Android.

Justin Willey, Business Development

Photo of Justin Willey

Justin has a B.S. in Environmental Science, Policy, and Management from UC Berkeley. In 2009, he received a number of grants to establish a bike share and bicycle shop at UC Berkeley. Justin has since been involved in planning, designing, implementing, and managing bike share systems around the country. Justin is excited by the opportunity to transform the urban landscape through bicycles.

Patrick T. Hoffman, Project Management

Photo of Patrick T. Hoffman

Patrick is a LEED AP and has a Bachelor of Architecture from Drexel University in Philadelphia and a M.S. in Urban Planning from Columbia University in the City of New York. He is an experienced Project Manager and has managed complex design, construction, research and product development projects involving public and private partners. Patrick is passionate about empowering people to create dynamic and vibrant communities.