Posts Tagged ‘speed hump’

New and Improved? The 2016-Era Speedbumps on JFK Drive in Golden Gate Park Now Have More Painted Lines

Monday, April 17th, 2017

So these lines are new, that’s the news.

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I’ve never seen this kind of thing. I guess people were getting surprised by the bumps?

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Frisco remains on the cutting edge of paint engineering, it would seem.

I’ll tell you, I go over these things at a steady 25 MPH, but others slow down to about ten and then speed up again to around 30 only to slow down again a short stretch down the road. That’s the update…

Ever More “Speed Hump” Speed Bumps for Golden Gate Park – What’s the Recommended Speed for These Things?

Thursday, November 3rd, 2016

Get up to “speed” here.

Here we go – on JFK looking east towards Transverse / Crossover

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And now close to Marx Meadow looking west – this one will be going in soon:

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I guess this one will go almost all the way across JFK Drive:

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And, now closer to 30th Avenue, looking east – this was the first to be installed, now with a new sign:

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I don’t know when I’ll make it back here with a vehicle. IMO, 20 MPH or so is prolly the limit for you. (I had my decidedly non-sporty ride mistakenly set in SPORT mode, but I don’t think it makes much difference on a road regularity as big as this, but I’ll try it again sometime on my ride’s softest suspension setting.)

OTOH, if you have a brand-new BMW M4 GTS, how about 0 MPH as the limit?

And on bikes heading west, IDK. Look out, Jack, is all I can say.

I think the actual speed limit for the bumps is 25 MPH, but that seems too fast for IRL.

Our SFMTA has reported that some drivers go 32-34 MPH on this stretch of JFK and I’m sure these numbers come from someplace real, but I’m also sure whatever stat they’d report has been manipulated for their own purposes, oh well.

On It Goes…

A Brand-New “Near Term Speed Hump” Speed Bump, Installed on JFK Drive in Golden Gate Park

Tuesday, November 1st, 2016

Here it is:

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These photos are from a few days back, and this bump / hump itself prolly was installed about ten days back. If you hit this thing at 25 + you will feel it, I promise you. My ride was practically made to handle something like this bump with aplomb, and I certainly felt it. Oh, and look, a speedometer system, of sorts:

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Here’s the “near term” language, straight from our incompetent SFMTA.

Humps cause car deceleration without creating the noise, vibration or safety issues associated with their sharper bump cousins.

I’ll tell you, not a whole bunch of drivers go signif more than 25 MPH on the JFK, despite what SFGov might tell you, or imply, with their nonsensical “some traffic travels through JFK at 32-38 MPH type” of stat. Well, sure, some traffic. I go through at exactly 25 which requires a touch of braking on the downhillier parts like near Speedway Meadow. (Hellman Meadow? I don’t think that’ll take for a good long time.) Anyway, if you get on my rear bumper I’ll simply pull over, pretending to get ready to park, and then pull back in after you’ve passed me. But I don’t do that too often.

(If you wanted to decrease illegal “speeding” on JFK, you’d raise the limit to 30 MPH and, conversely, if you wanted to, for some reason, increase illegal speeding on JFK, you’d lower the limit to 20 MPH.)

Anyway, if you want to lower speeds on JFK, you’d put in a brace of speed bumps – that’ll work. Of course, there’d be the noise, vibration, and safety concerns of San Francisco voters, but that will get addressed later, one assumes…

And of course, a few speed bumps is nothing like this recent proposal.

And oh, down Mexico way, if a municipality want to have a nothingburger speed bumps like this, they’d hire somebody to do it one day and then it’d be done the next – it wouldn’t turn into an expensive half-year “project” with countless meetings and endless news releases…

OK, Everybody SPEED HUMP! – What’s the Point of Our Ineffectual SFMTA’s Brand-New Ineffectual Speed Bumps?

Thursday, July 7th, 2016

So we have new speed bumps / speed bumps / speed cushions over town these days?

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First of all, SPEED HUMP. Heh. I mean, it’s like a sign people would Instagram from their visit to Australia or something. What’s wrong with speed bumps? That’s what Californians call your speed humps, I’m srsly, SFMTA.

Second of all, these new-school speed bumps I see in the Western Addition / Alamo Square Historic District and The Richmond have got to be the least effective traffic slowing / “traffic calming” installations I’ve ever encountered. Unless you’re driving around a double-parked vehicle or giving space to a bike rider, you won’t ever feel these things. See the channels on the left and right of the white arrow? That’s where your wheels go. So this appears to be make-work construction project / psychological exercise to get drivers to think a speed bump is here? Your brand-new rabbit-proof fence is too low is so bunnies simply hop over it with ease, is what I’m saying, Mate.

Third of all, oh, this IS a make-work construction project / psychological exercise. Check it: “Apply for Residential Traffic Calming.” So what’s being calmed here IRL – the tempers of area homeowners complaining to the SFMTA, it looks like?

So yes, SFMTA / SFGov, you are “doing something” and yet, you’re not really doing anything at all.

Kind of like when you all talk about Vision Zero 2024.

Hey remember back in 2013, when Mayor Ed Lee and SFGov promised to “Reduce serious and fatal pedestrian injuries by 25% by 2016?” I do. How did that work out? Oh, not at all?

SFMTA, you’re not a safety organization.

Sry.

What is the process for getting traffic calming on my street?

  • Application: Residents who are concerned about speeding on their streets are encouraged to submit applications and neighborhood petitions to initiate the process for receiving traffic calming measures. Complete applications for the 2015/2016 program are due on July 31, 2015.
  • Evaluation & Ranking: Once applications are received, SFMTA staff collect the additional data needed to determine whether an application qualifies and how severe the problem is. This includes conducting speed & traffic count and reviewing data on the number of collisions for each location. Once this data is gathered for all applications, they are ranked based primarily on speeds, traffic counts, collisions and the land use types within a short proximity to the street, which can include the presence of schools, transit stops, health care facilities and retail activity, among others.
  • Inform Applicants: Once the evaluation and ranking phase is complete, applicants will be informed of whether or not their location will receive a traffic calming project the following year.
  • Determine Project List: SFMTA staff then review each of the top locations to determine whether a speed hump would be an appropriate tool to reduce speeds at that location.  In some cases, other measures will be recommended.
  • Inform & Ballot Neighbors: Residents on accepted blocks will be contacted by the SFMTA with information about the project, and asked to vote on whether they would like traffic calming implemented on their street. Fifty percent of returned ballots must be in favor of the measure – signatures from the original application count as “yes” votes unless a “no” vote is received from the same address.
  • Design & Approval: If the neighbors vote in favor of the measure, SFMTA engineers will finalize the designs and bring the proposals through the official SFMTA public hearing process.
  • Construction: For applications submitted by July 31, 2015, speed humps and other traffic calming measures will likely be constructed in late 2016.

A Virtual Speed Hump Created by a Home-Owning Graffiti Artist

Monday, February 16th, 2015

Sometimes, you need to turn vigilante to get stuff done in this town:

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(I’ll tell you, “speed hump” meant something different when I was a lad…)

What’s So Great About the Great Sand Wastes? West Bay Trilogy: Virtual “Speed Hump” Speed Bump

Monday, April 18th, 2011

Who would do such a thing? DPW or some insular sanctermonious Prius-driving NIMBY-type  living way out in the West Bay?

Click to expand

 

Official San Francisco Sign: “SPEED HUMP”

Tuesday, September 16th, 2008

You can tell this is a real City And County of San Francisco street sign by the small letters encoded on the bottom.

So it’s easy to tell its an official sign, just like our “END BUSH” sign on Presidio. And totally the opposite of this fake, home-made “PET WASTE TRANSMITS DISEASE” sign on Franklin.

Click to enlarge:

A similar sign up in British Columbia leads this couple to ask, “Whatever happened to romance?”