Posts Tagged ‘speed’

How About a MUNI #5 Fulton Limited Bus Line Every Day? Eric Mar’s Proposal – Big Meeting August 21

Monday, August 13th, 2012

From the mind of your Supervisor Eric Mar comes a proposal to have a 5 Fulton Limited during the morning and evenings drives Monday through Friday, plus a 5 Fulton short line from 6th Avenue to the Financh.

Like if the N Judah can get an N Judah Express, why can’t the #5 Fulton get a #5 Fulton Limited, am I right, gf?

So, if this sound good to you, as well it might, be sure to attend the big meeting on August 21, 2012 at 5:30 PM, 461 6th Avenue betwixt Anza and Geary:

Click to expand

Hurray!

In Case You Were Wondering, This is What It Looks Like to Go 35 MPH Down Castro Across Market Street

Monday, July 9th, 2012

You know, just in case you were wondering.

Instructions:

1. Go to http://www.youtube.com/html5 to enable HTML5 (if you haven’t already).

2. When playing back, use the Settings button (the “gear” icon that you also use to change resolution) to set the playback speed to 2x.

I’ll tell you, I’ve got more miles than you:

1. Driving in San Francisco; AND

2. Riding a bike in San Francisco; AND

3. Walking about in San Francisco* 

And let me tell you, it’s hard for me to watch the first few seconds of the above video in fullscreen without pressing the floor with my right foot.** Watching this vid at 2x kind of makes me nervous.

Anyway, just in case you were wondering….

*All three of those things. OTOH, you might have me beat on MUNI, particularly the bus lines. And BART, you might have me beat on BART as well. But not driving, cycling, OR walking about in the 415. Sorry, Junior. 

**You see, ’cause that’s my braking foot, and 35 MPH is simply Way Too Fast to come down Castro Street. IMO. 

So Far, the SFPD and George Gascon Have Handled the Chris Bucchere Case Perfectly. But Does Divis Have Stop Signs?

Friday, April 27th, 2012

Boy, the Internet is full of criticism these days over how the SFPD and the San Francisco District Attorney’s Office have been handling the cyclist Chris Bucchere vs. pedestrian Sutchi Hui case.

And yet, what have they done wrong so far? Nothing that I can see.

Wisely, they aren’t trying to prove things that are tough to prove to the very high standard required, so stuff like who used Chris Bucchere’s online accounts to post his post-accident thoughts and what color what traffic light was when – that stuff, isn’t going to matter all that much if a criminal trial comes.

So that’s fine.

But there’s this:

““We have a witness that puts him blowing stop signs and lights on Divisadero Street,” the captain added.”

But the part of Divisadero that’s in the area doesn’t actually have stop signs.*

Check it out on the YouTube. The beginning part of this video, The Strava “Castro Street Bomb” (aka Castro Street Descent) shows the southern terminus of Divisadero.

As you can see, there aren’t any stop signs there.

But maybe the captain was talking about Castro Street?

If that’s the case, the question then becomes what would motivate a cyclist to behave in the ways alleged.

But we’ll find out soon enough…

*And the other part of Divisadero up in Pacific Heights far to the north? Wow, that’s probably the last place in the world where you’d want to be blowing stop signs on a bike.

Did Cyclist Chris Bucchere Discuss Prizes for “Winning” Strava Segments Just Four Days Before His Castro Collision?

Friday, April 13th, 2012

Well, you make the call:

Of course you can conclude, at this early date, exactly this:

“Strava is not responsible for Chris’ actions…”

(That one comes from one of Chris Bucchere’s cycling buddies, BTW.)

Or, of course, you can conclude that Strava is totally responsible for the recent collision in the Castro.

Or you can be like me and remain unsure of the connection between the death of pedestrian Sutchi Hui and Strava.

Your choice.

Hey, let’s see what cyclists are saying about Strava and the recent pedestrian death in the Castro:

“as a STRAVA user, my first thought when I saw that he was using STRAVA was that he was trying to post the best time on a segment (STRAVA’s social aspect includes public leaderboards, which is actually kind of fun). looks like that stretch of Castro is, indeed, a marked segment, which is absolutely fucking stupid and likely encouraged in some small way his reckless behavior.”

And there’s this:

“I actually think the social media angle — especially the Strava stuff — the the most interesting part of this story. I’m not sure I’m ready to fully demonize Chris Bucchere quite yet — presumably he’s a human being and, thus, a crooked timber like the rest of us. But as someone interested in social media including the effects of the “gamification” movement on our culture, I find Strava’s role fascinating. And a great example of “gamification” being applied to something haphazardly and without thinking through the negative consequences… (Yes, I fucking hate the word “gamification,” but that’s all I can think of.) STRAVA’s probably going to have some liability here.”

And then there’s this:

“Strava removes segments flagged as dangerous for exactly this reason. But a lot of riders (myself included) complained that it wasn’t effective, because people with axes to grind were flagging all segments in certain places, rendering the site effectively useless. I don’t know what their policy is on dangerous segments now.”

And here’s some more, from Alan of Scarlet Fire,  on gamification and Strava in general:

Strava ‘s biggest strength lies within the ingenious “segments” feature.
Upload a gpx track of your completed ride, and Strava analyses the data with all the usual stats you’d expect, plus a breakdown of specific segments of the ride, eg hill climbs.

Here’s the clever bit -
It knows who else has completed those segments, and ranks everybody according to time. The fastest gets a KOM, King of the mountain achievement. (Yes, girls, you get QOM’s).
Most people wouldn’t bother to go to the trouble of timing themselves on individual climbs within their ride. Way too much hassle! Strava does it automatically, and awards you an achievement when you beat your personal best (PB).

Strava app screenshot (Samsung Galaxy S2)

If a section of your route doesn’t already appear as a segment, no problem – simply define it as a new segment and see how you rank. The premium version of the service also allows you to break the table down by age range and weight ranges.

Recently, whilst out on a ride, I was aware that a friend had been the first to log a new segment for a particular climb (there aren’t that many Strava users in North Wales yet!) and had the KOM award. Instead of going at my usual pace, the gaming instinct kicked in, and I found myself visiting a very high heart rate zone, and putting in a lot of effort. Later, when I uploaded my GPS data to Strava it was hugely satisfying to realise that I had beaten his time by almost 2 minutes and claimed the KOM. He also got an email from Strava saying I’d beaten his time. Nice.

Silly and childish? Very, I know.
Did it feel good? Hell, yes..
Did I get a better workout? Definitely.
Will I work harder on future climbs because this technology will let me know automatically whenever I set a new PB on specific climbs? Very likely.”

 

Video of What It Looks Like to Ride Strava.Com’s “Castro Street Bomb” – Was Chris Bucchere Racing Down Castro Street?

Monday, April 9th, 2012

Here’s the latest regarding the Castro District’s international news:

Expect Strava to get subpoenaed if this tragic story of reckless cycling and a pedestrian death goes to court.”

And here’s the Strava.Com segment what used to be called the Castro Street Bomb (and then the Castro Street Descent). It’s not too exciting. Rather sedate, actually. But I’m sure if you’re hauling butt to become the latest Strava.Com “KOM” (King of the Mountain) and you may or may not be “Idaho Rolling” through red lights, then it could be very exciting / addicting:

Strava still has lots of downhill “bomb” segments listed about town of course. How about the Hyde Street Bomb or the 20th Street Bomb?

What if I started a Market Street Drag Race website for car drivers? They could make a segment like “Second Street to Sixth Street Drag” or something and people could keep track of their times using the GPS. Would you say that I was encouraging recklessness? Or not?

And here’s part of the Strava Kills” topic at the MTBR.Com forums:

Unfortunately, there is no simple way for the biking community to pass on the message of “we are really sorry for your loss, please don’t judge all bikers. this particular individual is an a-hole, please stick it to him in every way possible”.

Sad thing is, even as this story makes it’s way around the cycling community, there are people that pull the same **** — running reds/stop signs/etc. from SF down to SCruz — that won’t connect this situation with possibilities around their own actions.”

And I’d link you to what they’re saying at the SF Fixed.Com boards but I don’t know how to do that. (It’s a bit contentious over there these days, I understand.)

And this just in:

…nothing is worse than red lights.

CVC 21456: Did Pedestrian Sutchi Hui Have the Right-of-Way When He Walked Onto Castro Street? Possibly Not

Friday, April 6th, 2012

Let’s review:

“The light turned red as I was cruising through the middle of the intersection and then, almost instantly, the southern crosswalk on Market and Castro filled up with people coming from both directions.

So it looks as if cyclist Chris Bucchere didn’t run a red light.

Now, what about the law?

“21456.  Whenever a pedestrian control signal showing the words “WALK” or “WAIT” or “DON’T WALK” or other approved symbol is in place, the signal shall indicate as follows:

(a) “WALK” or approved “Walking Person” symbol. A pedestrian facing the signal may proceed across the roadway in the direction of the signal, but shall yield the right-of-way to vehicles lawfully within the intersection at the time that signal is first shown….”

What this is saying is that pedestrians in California need to let traffic clear an intersection before walking when the WALK turns on for them.

(Most pedestrians in San Francisco don’t seem to know this….)

Did STRAVA.Com Help Kill Pedestrian Sutchi Hui? Timing Yourself on the “Castro Street Descent” (AKA Castro Street Bomb)

Friday, April 6th, 2012

I don’t know, did Chris Bucchere’s speed going down Castro Street last week have anything to do with STRAVA?

You know, the way it had something to do with a death in Berkeley back in 2009?

You Make The Call:

Do you see the “Castro Street Descent” there? Up until March 29, 2012, that said Castro Street Bomb. Like when you go “bombing” down the street.

Check it:

I don’t know, Strava.

Care to say anything about this?

Michael Horvath 
Co-Founder & CEO
Jordan Kobert 
VP Business Development
Mark Shaw 
VP Engineering
Rachael Parsons 
VP Marketing
Greg Gretsch 
Board Member
Jamie McJunkin 
Board Member
Mark Gainey 
Board Member
Ariel Poler 
Board Member

 

Nancy Pelosi Announces First Annual Bay Area Science Festival, Oct. 29 to Nov. 12 – It’s Going to be Huge!

Tuesday, August 16th, 2011

Holy Toledo, this thing is going to be huge.

Check it:

“Featuring more than 100 free events, the inaugural Bay Area Science Festival will bring together an unprecedented brain trust of the region’s scientific and educational partners to produce what is expected to be one of the largest science-based events ever held in the United States.

The San Francisco Bay Area is known for its groundbreaking work in science and technology, yet many who call the Bay Area home have little opportunity to experience the wonder of science. Led by the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), the Bay Area Science Festival is designed to inspire and build interest in science, technology and engineering among people of all ages and backgrounds.

The public will be invited to this series of events stretching from Santa Rosa to San Jose, including opportunities to experience science in action and hear about the latest scientific discoveries and culminating in a blow-out finale at AT&T Park.”

Science! 

Students at Wallenberg High School participated in a hands-on lesson taught through the UCSF Science Education & Health Partnership program, which was founded in 1987 and is now organizing the Bay Area Science Festival.

 

Muchas gracias, UCSF!

Ever more deets, after the jump

(more…)

OMG, OMG, the First Annual Bay Area Science Festival Runs Oct 29th to Nov 6th, 2011! Includes “Nerd Speed Dating”

Thursday, July 14th, 2011

Holy Toledo, this thing is going to be huge.

I’m talking huge.

Science! 

Students at Wallenberg High School participated in a hands-on lesson taught through the UCSF Science Education & Health Partnership program, which was founded in 1987 and is now organizing the Bay Area Science Festival.

 

Muchas gracias, UCSF!

“From October 29th to November 6th, the Bay Area will come alive with science & technology activities – lectures, debates, exhibitions, concerts, plays, workshops, and more. This ambitious collaborative public education initiative brings together our leading academic, scientific, corporate, and non-profit institutions to showcase the region as an international leader in innovation. Science happens all around us and directly impacts our daily lives – are you ready to unleash your inner scientist?

Discovery Days

It’s always festival time in the Bay Area! This program brings the fun and excitement of science to a huge crowd. In conjunction with local science outreach groups, the Discovery Days will have hundreds of hands-on activities, numerous performances, interactive demonstrations, and family-oriented science entertainment. But instead of one, we’re holding 3 different carnivals throughout the Bay Area to bring science to you!

  • East Bay Discovery Day at Cal State East Bay – Hayward: 10/29/11
  • North Bay Discovery Day at Infineon Raceway – Sonoma: 11/05/11
  • Festival Finale at AT&T Park – San Francisco: 11/06/11

Science at the Library

From Santa Rosa to San Jose, and everywhere in between, the Bay Area is a region of neighborhoods. For those who like to stay local, don’t miss the festival events taking place right in your community. Scientists, engineers, and other experts are set to appear in local libraries and community centers, providing over 50 fun programs for all to enjoy – most of them free.

Bay Area Star Party

Explore the cosmos! You are invited to take a “guided tour” of the stars hidden in our city night sky. Observatories around the Bay Area will open their doors to the public and feature talks by faculty and guest astronomers. In Oakland, Chabot Space and Science Center will host the grandest star party with its talks being broadcast over the radio for all to hear. Can’t make it to an observatory? Stargazing sites will be set up at community centers and parks in neighborhoods across the Bay Area. Don’t have a telescope? No problem! A bevy of local astronomers will bring both their equipment and their vast knowledge of the night sky to each location.

Wonder Dialogues

Ever wonder…how close we are to curing cancer? How will augmented reality impact the way we use media? How is our genetic code being used to improve medicine? What role do we play in preventing extinction? What makes an addict? These are just some of the many questions that will be explored during the Bay Area Science Festival’s Wonder Dialogue Series. Don’t miss this opportunity to talk with some of the world’s top scientists & engineers.
Topics under Development:

  • The Big C: the Future of Cancer Research
  • Can We Make it to Mars?
  • The End of the Universe and the Search for Meaning

One City, One Science Book
So many great science books, but so little time. Join the San Francisco and San Mateo County Libraries as we celebrate the best of science in book form. These annual citywide literary events encourage members of the community to read the same book at the same time and then discuss it in book groups and at numerous locations. Stay tuned for the announcement of the book!

Science Hikes

Take a walk on the science side! A number of scientists-guided hikes across the Bay Area will be available at your feet – just get out there and enjoy.
Hikes in Development:

  • Seismology along the San Andreas Fault
  • Water Conservation and the Pulgas Water Temple Hike
  • Tidal Restoration of the South Bay Salt Ponds
  • Paddle Elkorn Slough with a Naturalist

Science Pub Crawl
Some of the greatest scientific discoveries and discussions originated in local bars and cafes. The Bay Area Science Festival takes the conversation into our bars and cafes with an epic evening of scientific merriment. Enjoy the lighter side of science, from nerd speed dating to cocktail science.

ZOMG, the Ziptrek Zipline is Coming Back to San Francisco for the Summer of 2011! Just $29 a Ride

Sunday, June 26th, 2011

Here’s the news from AkitIt’s ba-aaaack! Its the ZipTrek EcoTours zipline* (or ziplines, as they will have two, side-by-side). Deets are below.

Now, last year, back in 2010, the rides were free, so people were lining up at 3:00 AM. But this year, the cost will be $29, so that will certainly cut down on the riff-raff, and therefore surely shorten the queue.

(And oh, our friends from up in the Great White North just told me that they will be highly disappointed if Edwin Lee, San Francisco’s once (and future?) Mayor chickens out, if he blows off his obligation. Other Mayors have done it and it all worked out fine. See below for one example…)

This could be you:

Hangtime by Justin.Beck

The deets:

All guests are required to sign an Assumption of Risks and Release of Liability Agreement (coming soon) before zipping. Under 19 requires signature by a parent or guardian.

The ziplines are gravity fed, so guests do not have to worry about controlling their own speed. Guides are stationed at each tower to connect (launch platform) and disconnect (landing platform) each and every guest. Age restrictions apply and guests must weigh more than 65 pounds and no more than a maximum of 275 pounds.

When:
Summer 2011
11:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. *

Where:
Justin Herman Plaza at Embarcadero Square, San Francisco, California

* times may vary on certain days”

Will you have the guts to climb a temporary tower (80 feet tall!) just like this one from 2010 to earn the right to tell your friends you rode the Justin Herman Plaza Zip Line?

Just asking.

via Josegee – click to expand

Clicque to expand

But first, you’ll need to wait in line next to the abysmal Vaillancourt Fountain, sign a waiver, and get harnessed up.

Le mise-en-scene.

You’ll ascend the 80 foot tower and encounter a friendly Canadian guide at the top. If you need a pep talk, you’ll get one:

You’ll soon be steadying your nerves by glancing at your jump buddy…

…and then you’ll be off, into the wild bleu.

Sisters doing it for themselves:

Can you see the nervous giggles? There’s your team bonding right there.

And this is what it felt like last year. Everything zooms by with a quickness, and there’s a loud buzzing above your noggin. Some people go upside-down even.

And they’ll totally let you bring a camera to make your own YouTube:

You owe it to yourself to try.

Don’t dissappoint lovely Ashleigh. She brought her Olympic Gold all the way down here last year just so you’d consider Vancouver as the starting point for your next vacation:

via Amy Widdowson

And I’ll tell you, last year the kids from Project Insight were quite amused to see former San Francisco Mayor Willie Brown take a run on the fantastic British Columbia Zip-Line near the Ferry Building.

Here’s an account from John Coté.

Willie, sporting cashmere, handed out souvenir mittens (I still have a pair sitting in the back seat of Mom’s Taxi) from Up North:

Then it was time to harness up:

A reluctant exchange of headgear:

It’s go time.

 

Then he was off:

 

Here’s a close-up of those cardinal socks:

The landing tower. Here’s the reverse angle from David Paul Morris

And then a press conference:

His reaction after flying through the sky?

“I was scared as Hell, but there was no way I was going to show it!”

Good for you, Mr. Brown. Will you ride again in 2011?

Anyway, if he can do it, you can too.

See you there this summer!

And get the latest info direct from la source here:

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*Aka flying fox, foefie slide, zip wire, aerial runway, aerial ropeslide, death slide or tyrolean crossing