Posts Tagged ‘spire’

Goldsworthy, Spire, Presidio, Timeless

Tuesday, July 8th, 2014

It‘s still really quite striking, even after all these years

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The Spire: Andy Goldsworthy’s Tree Sculpture is Now an Icon of the Presidio

Wednesday, September 15th, 2010

I thought they would have taken down The Spire from Andy Goldsworthy by this time, but it keeps trucking along.

It’s practically a landmark now – you can’t miss this 90 foot tall icon if you’re in the area.

As it looks at sunset:

Click to expand

All the deets, from when it was new:

Artist Andy Goldsworthy Makes New Art from Aging Presidio Trees. Renowned artist interprets the historic Presidio forest
 
Presidio of San Francisco (September 18, 2008) – Renowned British artist Andy Goldsworthy is bringing his vision to the Presidio in a new work that showcases efforts to save the Presidio’s aging forest. The artist’s team has begun work in the Presidio in a cypress grove along the Bay Area Ridge Trail above Arguello Boulevard. The new work is entitled “The Spire.” 

”The Spire” will be made from 30 to 40 cypress trees that the Presidio Trust forestry crew has saved following its reforestation effort in the area. The sculpture will be about 15 feet in diameter, tapering to 90 feet at its peak. The Trust has removed about 150 dying trees from the grove and over the next decade, will replant 1,200 trees in the area. The new trees will grow up around the sculpture, which will eventually disappear into the forest. “The sculpture will be a poetic reference to the forest’s past and will welcome the next generation of trees,” said Presidio forester, Peter Ehrlich. “In 20 years the new trees will be about as tall as the sculpture.”
 
Goldsworthy is known to many through the 2001 film, “Rivers and Tides.” He draws his inspiration from places and creates art from materials found close at hand, such as twigs, leaves, stones, snow, and ice, and his works interact with their environment.
 
“The Spire” recalls one of his earliest sculptures, “Memories,” also spires of mature trees, created in 1984 in the Grizedale Forest in the Lake District of North West England. “I have not found another great location for this type of work until now,” said Goldsworthy. Today, the sculptures are among the more than 60 works of art in the Grizedale forest.
 
The Presidio Forest was planted by the United State Army at the end of the 19th century in an effort to beautify the post and to set it off from the city that was growing around it. “The forest is made up of Eucalyptus, pines, and cypress trees. The trees were planted over a short period of time. While the Eucalyptus trees are thriving, the pines and cypress, which typically live for about a century, are dying. We will replant these trees in one- and two-acre groves over the coming decades,” said Ehrlich. “By staggering the reforestation over as long a period as possible, we will create an uneven-aged forest, one that will be healthier and more sustainable.”
 
The Presidio Forest is a dramatic example of how people have shaped the landscape of the historic military post. In 2006 Goldsworthy visited the Presidio and was inspired by the history and character of the forest. The Presidio’s man-made forest is an evocative backdrop for the artist who strives, “to make connections between what we call nature and what we call man-made.”
 
Work on the sculpture will continue through the end of October, at which time the public will be invited to take a walk along the Bay Area Ridge Trail and discover “The Spire.”
 
Andy Goldsworthy was born in 1956 and spent his childhood in Yorkshire, England. He has made most of his art in the open air in places as diverse as the Yorkshire Dales, the North Pole, and the Australian Outback. He is known to many Americans through the film, Rivers and Tides, which was released in 2001. His works in the Bay Area include “Stone River” at Stanford University made from the rubble left after the Loma Prieta earthquake, and “Drawn Stone” at the De Young Museum in San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park, which also recalls San Francisco’s earthquakes and their effects.
 
The Presidio of San Francisco is a national park and a National Historic Landmark District. Four hundred and sixty nine historic buildings and diverse historic landscapes, such as the forest and the parade grounds, contribute to its landmark status. The Presidio is overseen by the Presidio Trust, established by Congress in 1996.

It’s Hard to Tell You’re in California’s Fourth-Largest City When at Andy Goldsworthy’s Spire

Wednesday, May 12th, 2010

I guess you can see a famous landmark in the background, but otherwise this scene in the Presidio is fairly bucolic. 

“Spire” by Andy Goldsworthy. Click to expand

Enveloping the Presidio with lush greenery, the historic forest is a beloved park feature. It provides habitat for birds and wildlife and also contributes to the Presidio’s designation as a National Historic Landmark District.

The Presidio forest was planted over a relatively short period of time and is more than 100 years old. While the eucalyptus trees continue to thrive, the pines and cypress are declining. Each year, the Presidio Trust replants two to three acres, staggering the effort to create an uneven-aged forest that can be more easily sustained.

Since 2002, the Trust has planted nearly 2,000 trees and is preserving the qualities that define the forest’s character, such as the orderly military alignment of trees. The Trust’s reforestation strategy also takes into account the forest’s importance as wildlife habitat and considers the needs of visitors who walk in its shade or admire the views it frames.

The grove along the Bay Area Ridge Trail near the Arguello Gate (see photo above) is predominantly cypress trees. The Trust has removed 150 dying trees from this area and will replant 1,200 trees along the Bay Area Ridge Trail over the next 10 years.

In 2006, artist Andy Goldsworthy visited the Presidio and was inspired by the history and character of the forest. He saw an opportunity to create a sculpture with the felled mature trees. Constructed in October 2008, The Spire tells the story of the forest, celebrates its history and natural rhythms, and welcomes the next generation of trees. It is a poetic reference to the forest’s past; as new young trees grow up to meet the sculpture, it will eventually disappear into the forest.

Andy Goldsworthy was born in 1956 and spent his childhood in Yorkshire, England. Goldsworthy’s work has been made in the open air, in places as diverse as the Yorkshire Dales, the North Pole, and the Australian Outback. His works in the Bay Area include Stone River at Stanford University, made from the rubble left after the Loma Prieta earthquake, and Drawn Stone at the De Young Museum in San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park, which also recalls San Francisco’s earthquakes and their effects.

Goldsworthy draws his inspiration from places and creates art from the materials found close at hand, such as twigs, leaves, stones, snow and ice, reeds, and thorns. The works made from these natural materials interact in different ways with their environments. The Presidio’s man-made forest is an evocative backdrop for the artist who strives “to make connections between what we call nature and what we call man-made.”

Spire recalls one of Goldsworthy’s earliest sculptures, Memories, also spires of mature trees, created in 1984 in the Grizedale Forest in the Lake District of North West England. “I have not found another great location for this type of work until now.”

The Spire is located on the Bay Area Ridge Trail near the Arguello Gate, west of Inspiration Point Overlook and north of the Presidio Golf Course Clubhouse (view Spire map).”