Posts Tagged ‘spl’

OMG, Drinks + Books! It’s IMBIBE at the Marina Branch Library, June 17th

Tuesday, May 24th, 2011

All right, get ready for the next IMBIBE – deets below

IMBIBE at the Marina Branch Library, June 17th, 7-10 PM

Eat, drink and be literary at a library cocktail party

San Francisco, CA— On June 17th, Friends of the San Francisco Public Library present IMBIBE—an after-hours library cocktail party for Friends members.

Throw on that spare spacesuit you have hidden in the back of your closet and join us as we celebrate the launch of this year’s One City One Book—Packing for Mars: The Curious Science of Life in the Void by acclaimed local author Mary Roach, who will be on hand to chat and stargaze with partygoers.
Guests can enjoy complimentary drinks and snacks in the Marina Branch stacks, talk at full volume and generally ignore library taboos—moon walking is encouraged. Party perks include a space-themed photo booth and giveaways of Packing for Mars. The San Francisco Amateur Astronomers will have a telescope or two set up outside, so fingers crossed for clear skies!

Open Bar provided by Anchor Steam Brewing, Reyka Vodka, Solerno Blood Orange Liqueur and Coit Liquor.

IMBIBE at the Marina Branch Library promises to be a party of astronomic proportions.
Follow us into the void and IMBIBE on June 17th!

About IMBIBE

IMBIBE is a quarterly event series where Friends Members are invited to mix and mingle amongst the stacks with special literary guests, all while enjoying complimentary food and drink in some of the most beautiful, newly-renovated branches in the San Francisco Public Library system.

Discover new and exciting resources at your library. For more information visit act.friendssfpl.org/Imbibe or call 415.626.7500.
ADDITIONAL IMBIBE DATES
September 30th: Richmond/Senator Milton Marks Branch
December 2nd: Potrero Branch
MEMBERSHIP INFORMATION:
IMBIBE is free for Friends Members.
Current members, please RSVP to Imbibe@friendssfpl.org
Non-Members can join the party by signing up online or at the door. For a limited time, Friends is offering a special, mid-year, 18-month Membership. Visit https://act.friendssfpl.org/midyear or call Mary Abler at (415) 626-7512 x107 for more information.

Friends Membership provides year-round funding and support for San Francisco Public Libraries. Support the Library and join Friends today!

WHAT: IMBIBE at the Library

WHERE: Marina Branch Library
1890 Chesnut St.
San Francisco, CA 94123
WHEN: Friday, June 17th, 7-10 PM

COST: FREE for Friends Members (includes hosted bar)
RSVP to Imbibe@friendssfpl.org Friends Memberships begin at $35+

Controversial Poet Amiri Baraka Coming to San Francisco’s Main Public Library This Sunday

Thursday, November 5th, 2009

Poet, activist and essayist and former SFSU Lecturer Amiri Baraka (or the Amiri Baraka) is coming to the San Francisco Public Library at the Main Branch this Sunday, Nov. 8, at 1 p.m -  Koret Auditorium, 100 Larkin Street. He’ll be discussing the first year of the presidency of Barack Obama.

Interestingly, Wiki has a whole section devoted to Amiri Baraka called “controversy” – you might find it worthy of note. See below.

amiribw
Via Wikipedia:

“The following is from a 1965 essay:

Most American white men are trained to be fags. For this reason it is no wonder their faces are weak and blank. … The average ofay [white person] thinks of the black man as potentially raping every white lady in sight. Which is true, in the sense that the black man should want to rob the white man of everything he has. But for most whites the guilt of the robbery is the guilt of rape. That is, they know in their deepest hearts that they should be robbed, and the white woman understands that only in the rape sequence is she likely to get cleanly, viciously popped.”

“More recently he has replied to questions about this quote with:

Those quotes are from the essays in Home, a book written almost fifty years ago. The anger was part of the mindset created by, first, the assassination of John Kennedy, followed by the Assassination of Patrice Lumumba, followed by the assassination of Malcolm X amidst the lynching, and national oppression. A few years later, the assassination of Martin Luther King and Robert Kennedy. What changed my mind was that I became a Marxist, after recognizing classes within the Black community and the class struggle even after we had worked and struggled to elect the first Black Mayor of Newark, Kenneth Gibson”

So much for ancient history. Here’s a bit from this decade:

“Amiri Baraka was Poet Laureate of New Jersey at the time of the September 11, 2001 attacks. He wrote a poem titled “Somebody Blew Up America” about the event. The poem was controversial and highly critical of racism in America, and includes angry depictions of public figures such as Trent Lott, Clarence Thomas, and Condoleezza Rice. The poem also contains lines claiming Israel’s involvement in the World Trade Center attacks:

Who knew the World Trade Center was gonna get bombed
Who told 4000
Israeli workers at the Twin Towers
To stay home that day
Why did
Sharon stay away?
[...]
Who know why Five Israelis was filming the explosion
And cracking they sides at the notion

O.K. fine. Here are the deets from the SPL:

“In a rare West Coast appearance, poet, playwright, essayist and political activist Amiri Baraka will deliver a historic speech on the nation’s first African-American president, Barack Obama, at the San Francisco Public Library. Appearing this Sunday, Nov. 8, at 1 p.m. in the Main Library’s Koret Auditorium, 100 Larkin St., San Francisco, Baraka’s presentation is titled, “We Are Already in the Future! Barack Obama: Year One.”

In 2008, during the primary and general election cycles, Baraka surprised, delighted and provoked his friends and enemies with a series of rigorous, inventive and powerfully deciphering essays on then-candidate Obama. With this unique event, Baraka will revisit those essays, and bring his keen, and always original, interpretation of the Obama Presidency in its first year.

A transitional figure from the Beat Generation and Civil Rights Era, Baraka is known as the father of the Black Arts Movement. Baraka is also one of the true giants of international poetry and a towering presence in the U.S. The talk will be immediately followed by a discussion with literary producer Justin Desmangles, and conclude with a question and answer session with the audience.