Posts Tagged ‘st.’

Signs of Life for the Academy of Art’s St. Brigid Church at Van Ness and Union

Thursday, August 26th, 2010

It’s been a long journey for St. Brigid’s Church at 2151 Van Ness but these ironworkers seem to think that the bulk of the necessary fix-up work has been completed.

Check out some of the history from the Academy of Art’s Paul Correa, below

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“A good example is the school’s building at 2151 Van Ness, the former St. Bridget’s church. It was dilapidated, leaking and slated for demolition when the Academy acquired it in 2005. The former owners couldn’t afford the very expensive seismic retrofit it needed, and other buyers weren’t interested for the same reason. In 2005 and ’06, our contractor cleaned up the water damage and did asbestos abatement. That was phase one. In phase two we filed our permit application for seismic upgrading; this was July of 2006. In February 2009, the historic commission granted a certificate of appropriateness for the retrofitting work and ADA improvements … actually all the improvements at that site. We’re planning on starting the seismic work at the end of spring semester. So the work has been going on for 2-1/2 or 3 years. Because it’s a historical building, the process of applying and reviewing the plans to get permits and begin work is challenging and time-consuming. But otherwise it’s typical of the effort that goes into making sure our buildings are safe and meet code. And it will be worth the effort to save a beautiful historic building that was endangered.”

The Tenderloin’s St. Boniface Parish Celebrates 150 Years – Church is 110 Years Young

Tuesday, June 29th, 2010

San Francisco’s St. Boniface Parish is celebrating 150 years in San Francisco this month.

It’s an impressive facility, nullus? Check it:

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And a random saint from the massive south wall for good measure, let’s call him St. Peter:

Happy birthday, Saint Boniface Parish!

The Sad End of the WWII-era Locomotives of the Old San Francisco Belt Railroad

Wednesday, June 2nd, 2010

Here’s where they sit now, Numbers 25 and 23 from the oddball San Francisco Belt Railroad. That was the shortline that California started in 1891

These locomotives were built during World War II to haul stuff around the waterfront, but since 1993 they’ve generally been cloistered inside Pier 96, making a few short trips now and then.

As seen at the end of Cargo Way near Heron’s Head Park:

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Here’s what the “roundhouse” used to look like at Sansome and Embarcadero. Check it, the building is still there – can you see where the tracks were?

Tourism is a much more important biz than freight-hauling these days, so don’t look for rail to make a comeback along the waterfront anytime soon. But maybe we’ll get the Fort Mason Tunnel open again for transit, once the goddamn NIMBYs of the Marina stop screaming about it.

Maybe…

Debut of Gott’s Roadside Tray Gourmet a Huge Success at the Ferry Building

Friday, March 26th, 2010

As promised, famed Taylor’s Automatic Refresher has a new name as of yesterday: Gott’s Roadside Tray Gourmet.

The reviews are already in for yesterday’s completely free party:

Expectations:  a long line of grumpy people and a halfway decent burger. Reality: A fast moving line with friendly people, friendly staff and a fun event with a DJ. 3 choices, ahi, cheeseburger, kimchee pulled pork. All came with fries and a drink (soda, champagne, beer). I was so surprised that they did the whole meal not just the free burger! The burger was cooked perfectly medium, fries were perfect and beer was good.”

Throw in 1000 free red shirts and it turned out to be quite the shindig. We’re talking crunk crunk, junk junk, drunk drunk.

Ah, Cristal, my T-shirt, and a couple of free ahi burgers - why not?  

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Yesterday’s mise-en-scene:

Verily, it was a “dancin’ on the tables kinda night.”

Bon Chance, Gott’s Roadside!

Actual Trauma on the Set of NBC’s Trauma – Star Aimee Garcia Busts Her Finger

Wednesday, March 17th, 2010

Lovely “Helicopter Hero” Aimee Garcia had a mishap a few days back in San Francisco while filming a scene for new (and improved?) Trauma.

As she recently related to NBC’s Natalie Morales:

“I was doing a scene where my ex-military boyfriend gets in a fight, and it was scripted that I just stand there … I just got involved. I pulled one actor off of another and they loved it. They said, ‘Keep doing it.’ We did it 12 times and I didn’t realize on the first take I broke my finger.”

Here’s the video from the Today Show.

A finger mishap always makes for good TV of course, especially when you don’t lie about it.  

Let’s hope Aimee can get her left hand back on that giant twirlypopper’s collective control sooner rather than later.

Courage.

NBC’s Trauma is Back on TV But With the Worst Ratings Ever

Tuesday, March 9th, 2010

Take a look for yourself to see dude just drive off the Bay Bridge due to a moment’s inattention in last night’s episode of NBC’s Trauma serial. (Do you think you’d survive after falling so far inside a Jeep Cherokee Classic? I don’t think it’d be possible, but maybe the breast implants inside the car softened the jolt or something.)

Yesterday’s relaunch, debuting the first new ep since November 2009, earned ratings of 1.4/3, which are 22% lower than last year’s average for the show.

Shooting in North Beach as it looked last year near the top of Kearny Street, the most-filmed block on any street in Northern California:

Anyway the bad ratings add up to trouble, according to The Wrap:

“The problem started at 9 p.m., with the previously sorta-canceled “Trauma” (1.4/3) returning from the grave as a Nielsen zombie. It hit its lowest rating yet, falling 22 percent from its fall average and 13 percent from its last original. It wouldn’t be shocking if NBC decided to quickly replace “Trauma” in the timeslot. That’s because “Trauma” tainted “L&O,” which managed a third-place 1.5/4 at 10 p.m. — down 25 percent from last week, when NBC aired a double dose of the drama from 9-11 p.m. Worse, “L&O” was actually off 6 percent from what “The Jay Leno Show” had been averaging at 10 p.m. Mondays.

“NBC — which actually did quite well last week, given the fact that it had to fill 5 hours of primetime post-Jay– does not want to see any negative Leno-to-scripted comparisons at 10 p.m. Period.”

Not saying I would or could do a better job, but maybe the whole concept of shooting this kind of old-school TV show on location on the Streets of San Francisco was a bad idea? Is that possible?

On It Goes. How much longer will this Great San Francisco Nielsen Zombie last?

An Apology From the Star of NBC’s Trauma, Plus New Filming at Oakland Islamic Center

Tuesday, February 16th, 2010

Why, it’s almost as if the people behind NBC’s Trauma serial have figured out a thing or two. Comes now Cliff Curtis, the New Zealand star who plays “cocky” helicopter pilot Rabbit, to say:

“The characters weren’t developed properly at first.

We took a lot of creative license, but learned from it.

We listened to the audience and to critics, and were able to satisfy a lot of complaints about the characters.

We improved the humor and the action on the front line.”

It’s almost like they’re shooting a whole new show! Good on you, Rabbit. Remember how excited people were when gorgeous Jennifer Siebel Newsom was in the pilot episode? Maybe we can get some of that back.

NBC/Universal

Now, while we’re remembering last autumn, wasn’t that the time when co-star Aimee Garcia was spinning this tale

 
O.K., hold on to that one. Now, try this on for size, per a recent interview with Cliff Curtis:
 
“NBC’s freshman “Trauma” series was considered such a sure-shot for early extinction that members of the crew gave up their apartments on San Francisco location.”
 
At The Length Truth Will Out. Moving on…
 
Shooting for, what shall we call it, Trauma II: This Time We Mean It moves to the East Bay tomorrow. Actually, they were looking for extras with Pakistani heritage just the other day. But keep in mind that when you’re an extra working on Treasure Island you get paid $1.79 more per hour than when you’re an extra working in Oakland. Why? It all has to do with the minimum wage. Anyway, you might be too late for this, but there could be other gigs coming up:
 
Mosque scenes will be filmed Wed. 2/17 at a temple in Oakland. Extras will appear to be praying when an older Pakistani woman has a seizure causing the cast member medics to respond.”
  
Take heart, extras - I can recall a time when the minimum wage was a lot less than $64/8-hour day. Oh well.
 
And of course the TV addicts are, once again, talking about how, once again, Trauma is a “goner”.
 
No matter, re-re-newed filming should continue ’til March or April, and then we’ll just have to wait and see, huh?

The Bizarre Valentines Day Christmas Trees of Lombard Street

Friday, February 12th, 2010

Look at this huge Christmas Tree taking up all the space at a bar on Lombard Street’s Motel Row. 

It’s been covered over with Valentine’s day-related tchochkes, gewgaws, knickknacks, baubles, and lagniappes.

See? (Customers’ and employees’ faces darkened out of respect.)

Happy Valentines!

Consumer Reports Disses UCSF Medical Center Over High Central Catheter Infection Rate

Tuesday, February 2nd, 2010

All right, Consumer Reports has a few notes about San Francisco hospitals in another Missive from Yonkers this AM. Actually, the people at CR sound a little hacked off, and for a couple of reasons.

Item One: They’re using a hospital’s ICU Central Line Associated Bloodstream Infection Rate as a yardstick of performance. Why? Why not. Here’s how CR feels:

“The procedures needed to eliminate ICU infections are simple, low-tech, and inexpensive, requiring a change of mindset and culture. All ICUs should be able to dramatically reduce if not eliminate these infections.”

O.K., so who has a central line infection rate of zero, who’s perfect?

Saint Luke’s Hospital

Saint Francis Memorial Hospital

Saint Mary’s Medical Center

After all those Saints go marching in, which San Francisco hospitals are doing less-than-perfect but better than average?

California Pacific Medical Center-Pacific Campus

Kaiser Foundation Hospital- San Francisco

But who’s left, who in the 415 is ”on the other end of the spectrum” with a reported infection rate that’s 80 percent worse than the national average when compared with similar ICUs?

UCSF Medical Center

Ouch.

Take a look for yourself on this almost-legible chart. Goran nasai, Gentle Reader - click to expand:

Do you buy all that? Well, for one, Steven E.F. Brown does, over at the San Francisco Business Times.

But what’s this - how about a little feedback from a California-licensed physician? Comes now Dr. Steven Suydam, who took a look at CR’s press release today and reacted thusly:

“Central line infections occur in every hospital, but some institutions, especially public academic institutions are simply more forthright about reporting them, and are more likely to have candid effective quality assurance programs in place, than private, for-profit institutions. In addition, hospitals have the latitude to classify a bloodstream infection as coming from an alternate source, if one is available, thereby avoiding the dreaded “CLABI” label. The alternative explanation, that UCSF physicians place central lines under less sterile conditions than private hospitals and maintain such lines with less care is simply nonsense.” 

O.K. then. But as always, You Make The Call. It certainly would be interesting to hear about what UCSF thinks of all this. Moving on… 

Widening our purview to the whole bay area gets us this:

“In the larger Bay Area, where Consumer Reports Health rated 29 hospitals, Consumer Reports found extreme variation between hospitals, even hospitals run by the same health care system.  For example, Kaiser Foundation Hospitals in Hayward, Santa Rosa, Vallejo, and South San Francisco reported zero central line infections, while Kaiser Foundation Hospital in San Jose had an infection rate that was 14 percent worse than the national average and the Kaiser Foundation Hospital in San Francisco reported a rate that’s 40 percent better than average.”

Item Two: CR doesn’t like getting blown off when it goes nosing around for data. So it has lots of criticism for the way California as a state is handling reporting of statistics. The California Department of Health should have data for us by January 1, 2011, but CR isn’t optimistic about this deadline getting met.

Anyway, who’s on the Naughty List (CR’s Health Ratings Center’s Director is Dr. Santa, srlsy) with naught to report?

San Francisco General Hospital Medical Center

O.K. then.

What’s it all mean? No se, mi amigo/a. One thing for certain though, this news release means that Consumer Reports Health wants your money. Sign up for a free 30-day trial that you’ll soon forget about until you get your credit card statement in two or three months – I don’t care what you do with your money. (Frankly, I object to the whole Consumer Reports-is-my-Bible mentality that certain people have. IMO, CR is just another data point in the constellation of information out there.)

Anyway, read the whole thing for yourself, after the jump.

Stay healthy.  (more…)

San Francisco’s St. Ignatius Church Looks Gorgeous at Nighttime

Wednesday, December 16th, 2009

 As seen from Cole Valley, with a #37 bus rolling by.

St. Ignatius Church looks really close but the Panhandle of Golden Gate Park  is in between, so this building (or at least the dome at the back of it, anyway) is fully three-quarters-of-a-mile away: 

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It almost looks Disneyesque when Sausalito sets off fireworks, like on the Fourth of July:

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