Posts Tagged ‘strava’

The Mystery of that Big Deadly “80 MPH” Collision at Pine and Gough – Driver Not Talking? – Jennie Z vs. Chris B.

Monday, October 7th, 2013

Well, here’s what David Stevenson @DStevensonKTVU has for us on the recent death of Kevin San:

Zhu’s attorney Alfredo Vea Jr. told KTVU his client is still too distraught to explain to him what happened. “I’ve tried to speak with her three times and all she does is cry,” said Vea. “She’s holding up, [but] mention the young man and she just falls apart.”

Well, gee. You’re able to raise hundreds of thousands of dollars to get out of jail in a heartbeat, but you’re just not in the mood to even tell your own attorney anything at all?

That’s not too helpful.

Of course, saying nothing is better than taking to the Internet ala Chris Bucchere, but it doesn’t help us understand what went wrong, does it?

“Chris B” ended up with a kind of felony conviction, but no jail time.

What if Jennie Zhu never says anything? Would she get jail time?

Mmmm.

One thing that’s going to have to change is the absurd 80 MPH speed estimate. It’s part of why this case got national attention. I’m sure the SFPD / SFDA can get a better estimate with video, if they can turn up some video. Bucchere’s speeding allegation held up after video analysis, but Zhu’s certainly won’t. Bucchere’s speeding had something to do with his interest in Strava, one assumes. Competition, “racing” as it was labeled. But why on Earth was Zhu going so fast?

The lights on Pine are timed, in a way.  But it’s tough getting across Polk, Van Ness,  Pine, Gough, Octavia, Laguna, Buchanan without hitting some reds these days. Could that be it? She was just trying to get home in a hurry? CalTrans would want to put in a freeway to get drivers to the West Bay all the way out there in the Sunset and the Richmond. Instead, we have congested, stop-and-go Pine and a MUNI system that runs slower than the private transit operators of a century ago.

And the cops just happened to be chasing her and yet her public DMV is clean?

This is quite a mystery…

If You’re Cool, You’ll RIde Your Bike Down Market Street Like This – Look Ma, No Hands – Coffee Cup Bonus

Wednesday, June 5th, 2013

This dude is bad-ass.

Now, do you think this guy is on Strava going 60 MPH downhill, so fast he can’t stay in his lane?

Or do you think he’s the kind of Strava person who would plow through a Market Street crosswalk over the speed limit and then place all the blame for a ped death* on pedestrians?

I don’t.

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Dude’s just taking it easy.

No medallions, dreadlocks, or black fists it’s just that gangster glare, with gangster raps that gangster shit, that makes the gang of snaps, uhh.

*True story. It’s the Chris Bucchere story. Our District Attorney’s Office has offered him a verrrrrry generous plea bargain deal, but there’s no resolution yet.

The Most Detailed Report of the Chris Bucchere vs. Sutchi Hui Hearing – Why Red/Yellow Doesn’t Really Matter

Tuesday, March 19th, 2013

Well, here it is, the most-detailed report yet of the latest Chris Bucchere vs. Sutchi Hui hearing, courtesy of  writer Kashmir Hill.

Here’s her conclusion:

Bucchere was going far too fast, but he may have run a very late yellow rather than a red, a mistake made worse because of the pedestrians entering the crosswalk very early. Everyone was being too aggressive in their commuting, but Bucchere’s aggressiveness held the highest risk for others.”

And here’s some more:

“The case interested me because press reports indicated that data from Bucchere’s Strava account — an app that bikers can use to track their rides — had been used to show how fast he had been going and to prove he had ignored stop signs. District Attorney George Gascón told me the Strava data was part of the reason the city had decided to bring such severe charges against Bucchere. ‘It implies he was trying to compete with himself,‘ Gascón said. Bucchere’s online comments also played a role. ‘His helmet was more important than a human being.’”

Take a look for yourself, read the whole thing. And then decide if the prosecution of Chris Bucchere has anything to do with a so-called “lynch mob.”

And for all you StreetsBlogSF fans out there, ask yourself this:

Would this case be international news without the Strava race-against-yourself-and others angle and/or the “heroic” helmet posting? And would there even be a case at all?

That’s the difference, that’s why this case is getting attention.

R.I.P. Sutchi Hui.

Breaking the Speed Limit on Masonic Avenue, Using a Bike – It’s Not Hard to Get Above 25 MPH

Friday, October 12th, 2012

‘Specially late at night, as here:

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There’s no need to use Strava to see how much over the limit you are. No, you can just look up at the electronic signs what use radar to tell you how fast you’re going.

But don’t try your speed runs in the daytime. That would be a little hazardous…

Turns Out That You Can’t “Win” Strava “King of the Mountain” in the Marin Headlands Without a Lot of Speeding

Friday, September 21st, 2012

You know, on your bike, on Conzelman, coming down from Hawk Hill at an average speed of 31 MPH.

See?

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What’s the limit on Conzelman, uphill or down? 25 MPH.

Do people get tickets from the park police for speeding on Conzelman? I don’t know, but I know people driving cars do.

Is that San Francisco-based Strava app affecting how people behave?

Slate.Com Wrote About San Francisco and Yelp and Cities.Data.Gov Today – But What Does It Mean?

Wednesday, September 5th, 2012

Take a look here:

The Most Important Information Missing From Yelp – Crowdsourcing sites and local government should pool their data to better inform consumers.”

Let’s check it:

“Last month, four major cities—San Francisco, New York City, Chicago, and Seattle—put statistics on things like crime reports, restaurant ratings, bed bug complaints, and public restroom locations online at cities.data.gov.”

So can we easily look up info about bed bugs in San Francisco on this newish website?

Nope!

Also:

“…a major frustration in urban centers is the amount of time spent trying to find a parking spot. To address this problem and improve air quality, San Francisco launched SFPark…”

So has SFPark reduced the amount of time spent trying to find a parking spot?

Nope!

And has SFPark improved air quality?

Nope!

SFPark is all about getting more money to the SFMTA, IRL.

Continuing:

“…consider the Bike Accident Tracker, a tool created by the Bay Citizen that mapped all reported bicycling accidents in San Francisco over a five-year period. On the map, the intersection of Market and Castro was identified as a hot spot…”

Uh, I think we kind of already knew about hot spots as the MSM regularly reports on them and it’s been doing that for donkey’s years.

Continuing:

” Just this past April a cyclist hit and killed a pedestrian at that same intersection, according the San Francisco Chronicle. If accident data were integrated with a site like Google Maps, making the critical information more easily available, is it possible that the deadly accident at Market and Castro could have been avoided? I’m not sure, but it’s worth looking into.”

Cyclist Chris Bucchere really, really liked Strava.com, and he really liked going fast downhill in urban areas, and he actually raised the idea of Strava segment “winners” (so-called “Kings of the Mountain”) “winning” coffee as an incentive/reward just a few days before the death of Sutchi Hui. I’m totally baffled how hot spot data dissemination would have affected anything.

All right, well that’s the first webpage of the article by Alissa Black (an ASU student?). I think I’ll stop here.

Uh, the reason why data about which hotels have bed bugs isn’t more widely disseminated is because the hotel industry doesn’t like that kind of thing.

And the reason why people walking into San Francisco restaurants don’t see a letter grade displayed out front is because the Golden Gate Restaurant Association doesn’t  want that kind of thing.

I don’t think the writer of the linked bit above understands how SF works.

JMO.

Sorry, San Francisco Bicycle Coalition – The Average Cyclist Doesn’t Care What You Say – Here’s Proof

Thursday, July 26th, 2012

[UPDATE: Attention nerdy white engineering types / transit activists who have some connection with Strava, Inc / Chris Bucherre / Kim Flynt. It's too bad that your NVIDIA co-worker / cycling buddy /KOM competitor / team $pon$or killed somebody / got killed / got sued but I don't really have anything to do with that. Feel free to call me a "dumbass" for revealing that people (paralegals? associates? concerned investors?) at the O'Melveny(sp?) law firm Google such search terms like "STRAVA lawsuit" and "STRAVA vicarious liability" and whatnot - that's your right as Americans. Feel free to band together on the Twitter and rap about how you white engineering types / transit activists are getting effed, somehow, yet again. But dudes, you gots ta chill. Take the emotion down a bit, why not? And think, maybe after Strava is gone, whenever that is, your cycling teams can get funding from somebody else, right? I said that Strava might get sued and you all pooh poohed that. And of course Strava got sued (you know, for wrongful death, right on sked, right before the statute, IN ADDITION to other stuff, like IP patent stuff from before). And I said that Chris Bucchere, the man what made some Mission Cycling members ashamed of their jerseys, might do hard time for the death of Sutchi Hui and you all pooh poohed that as well. And of course Chris Bucchere just might do hard time. But look above and see that this post is directed to the San Francisco Bicycle Coalition, not to you macho white engineering types / transit activists, you dig? The SFBC feels that it has some power over cyclists. The SFBC feels that cyclists have already cleaned up their acts in response to the recent cyclist-caused ped deaths. The SFBC hectors people about stopping before you hit the start of the crosswalk and/or the stop line. And I'm showing them how maybe they're not 100% always right about everything they say. That's all.]

Just one problem with Market Street’s excessively-wide crosswalks is that people need to stop far away from intersections, sometimes even behind stop lines.

Like this, for instance.

So what cyclists tend to do at red lights on Market is to weasel past the stop line and through the crosswalk so as to be ready for the green.

As here, on Market at Third Street:

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Now this kind of behavior is contrary to the party line of the San Francisco Bicycle Coalition.

To wit:

On a daily basis, be a bicycle ambassador by being a great representative of San Francisco’s amazing, diverse and growing community of people who bicycle. Stop behind the crosswalk, give pedestrians the right-of-way and others will follow.”

The cyclists probably aware of this but they just don’t care. (It’s like did Nancy Reagan’s hectoring about Just Say No To Drugs have any effect the past three decades? Think about it.)

And this is in the post-Bucchere, high-enforcement world of 2012.

You talk about safety for all but then tell pedestrians absolutely false statements about how they Always Have The Right Of Way – is that responsible behavior?

And you think that The Media is your problem, SFBC? Sure seems that way, based upon what you say.

Maybe The Media isn’t your problem.

Rich White Lady from the Marina Times, Susan Dyer Reynolds, Calls for Bicycle Commuter Licensing and Insurance

Friday, July 6th, 2012

You know, because of the Chris Bucchere thing.

Here it is, or a part of it, anyway:

“With huge numbers of people biking to work on a daily basis, it may be time to look into licensing commuter bicyclists so they must take the same DMV tests motorcyclists and motorists take to ensure that they know the laws. It also seems that offenders should face some of the same punishments motorcyclists and motorists face, like points against their license. And if they’re going to be commuters, thus increasing the chances of accidents on city streets, perhaps they should also have to carry insurance. I’m not advocating these measures for the person who bikes through Golden Gate Park recreationally, one or two Sundays a month; but for everyday commuters, I think it makes sense.”

Oh, hold on, this post will need a photo.

Type Marina District into the Google, and this is what you’ll get:

Hair lightened and teeth whitened – I’ll have to try that one of these days. 

Now, where was I? Oh yes, uh, I seriously kind of don’t think you can require licensing and insurance for people who go to work on a bike and not for the people who go about solely in Golden Gate Park.

And points at the DMV, well, that would seem to penalize those with driver licenses more than those without, capiche? 

And Davis, CA? Is that our lodestar now, law enforcement-wise, rich white Marina Lady?

OK fine: 

Via Louise Macabitas

I drink your milkshake, Susan Dyer Reynolds!

I drink it up!

P.S.: I’m Brown Larry Bird/ You’re the ’97 Celtics

P.S.S.: Gentle Reader, don’t miss these riveting stories from the Great White North:

Does Board of Supervisors President David Chiu Run Red Lights on Market Street? Yes – Here’s How He Does It

Friday, June 8th, 2012

This example here is from the place where McAllister meets Jones meets Market, in the corrupt Twitterloin / Tenderloin / Civic Center / Mid Market area.

President Chiu stopped his Public Bike because he had a red light – this intersection now has a three-way light sequence, what with the recent changes for the 5 Fulton bus. (Note that this is the best place on the west coast to buy a stolen iPhone.)

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A quick look up Jones (which is hardly ever busy) and he’s off:

Next stop, City Hall:

This is the proper technique of running a red light on a bicycle in San Francisco.

Strava fans should note that bikes in the 415 are for getting around, not for racing.

And bikes are especially not for going at or near 35 MPH at Castro and Market…

The Resurrection of the Dangerous “SouthParkDrive Descent,” the 54 MPH(!) Strava Segment That Killed Cyclist Kim Flint

Friday, June 1st, 2012

Get up to speed on the issue of the death of former avid Strava user Kim Flint right here:

Did attempt to set speed record cause cyclist’s death?

That was about two years back.

Was that segment “dangerous?”

No matter, it came back, as you can see here:

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Now, it’s flagged for being dangerous (what, just yesterday?), but not before tons of people attempted to beat Kim Flynt’s time, to become “King of the Mountain” (KOM) once again.

Here are the deets from a Reader Just Like You, Brandon:

“BTW, speaking of Strava and the cyclist who died in Berkeley in 2010 trying to reclaim his recently eclipsed “KOM” on the South Park Drive descent in Berkeley’s Tilden Park, the same segment has now reappeared on Strava again:
http://app.strava.com/segments/1243472

The full descent segment was flagged after Kim Flynt’s death, but a Strava user has redrawn the segment now starting it a little below the top and ending it enough before the bottom to get around the software blocking the segment.

Note that Kim Flynt’s once “record” descent is now all the way down in 7 way tie for 16th place:

16 Kim Flint
Jun 06, 2010
66.4km/h 152bpm 300W – 1:56

And the fastest time was set just a few days ago now:

Tim Medina
May 20, 2012
72.6km/h 168bpm 155W – 1:46

That’s over 45 mph avg (with a max. of 54 mph)!”

What’s the speed limit there, 30 MPH?

Does Strava encourage speeding? For example, how fast was Strava fan and cyclist Chris Bucchere going down Castro before hit collided with pedestrian Sutchi Hui? (Has there been a measurement done from the video yet?) Shouldn’t Strava ban segments with speeding in them?

Strava wants new customers, Strava wants to make money, right? This is how they do it, they let riders do what the riders want and then when the media focuses on a particularly dangerous segment, it all of a sudden gets flagged and goes down the memory hole.

Is that how you roll, Strava?