Posts Tagged ‘streets’

The Smallest Bottle of Maker’s Mark You Could Possibly Imagine – From the Streets of San Francisco

Thursday, January 31st, 2013

I says to myself, I says, “Is that a tiny bottle of Maker’s Mark?”

Then after kicking it over, I see that it is, red wax on top and everything

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Fin.

Kaepernicking is Ten Times Cheaper When You Buy from Bootleggers off the Street Instead of from the 49ers

Monday, January 28th, 2013

At the Justin Herman Plaza official lunchtime 49ers trailer – 150 didgeridoos!?!

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Now here we go, just $15 for a shirt that spells out Kaepernicking  for tout le monde to see.

It’s like a farmer’s market, but for t-shirts – Market Street, USA:

Perhaps all those millionaires at the San Francisco 49ers should lower their prices?

Remember to buy local!

NB: Sorry NFL, but lots of counterfeit stuff now has hologram tags as well. Oh well…c

Sometimes I think sitting on trains

Every stop I get to, I’m clocking that game

Everyone’s a winner now we’re making our fame

Bona fide hustler making my name

Inteceptor III GO-4 PCO Meter Maid Cart Repurposed as a Daily Driver on the Mean Streets of San Francisco

Wednesday, November 7th, 2012

See?

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How to Turn Heads on the Road: Buy a Meter-Maid Car – Used Ones Are Cheap, Cute, Maneuverable; The Most Fun You Can Have on a Trike

The Mystery Machine – Living Rent-Free on the Streets of San Francisco

Tuesday, October 9th, 2012

Living in your van is even cheaper than using AirBNB:

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Presenting Your Brand-New, Mid-Market SFPD Substation! At 72 6th Street in the Gritty Twitterloin – Nice Marble Facade

Tuesday, August 28th, 2012

I’ll tell you, that Bluoz is Everywhere You Want To Be, Twitterloinwise.

As here, where he’s the first to publicize the brand new police station on 6th Street betwixt Market and Mission: 

Via Bluoz – click to expand

You see, it’s “Coming in 2012,” which, of course, is actually already here right now so I guess that’s one way of saying OPENING SOON.

Will this place be more like a koban or more like an actual real police station?

We’ll see, soon enough.

Bon courage, SFPD! You have your work cut out for you.

Would You Like a “Free Gift?” Well, Then Just Join the U.S. Army: MUNI Bus Stop Recruiting Station, Market Street

Friday, June 29th, 2012

In the Financh, not too far from the official recruiting station on Davis near Broadway:

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Remember, “BRING IN THIS FLYER FOR A FREE GIFT!!!”

I Am Become Rob Anderson, #3: StreetsBlogSF Isn’t Simply a Blog, It’s a Religion (Or a Cult, Your Pick)

Tuesday, March 27th, 2012

Exhibit A:

Media Coverage of Pedestrian Deaths Misses the Big Story

I don’t know, I think the coverage was perfectly cromulent, but let’s take a look:

“A vague description…”

UH, WHAT DO YOU OFFER THAT’S BETTER, STREETSBLOGSF?

from Bay City News labeled Ferguson a jaywalker

A “JAY” WAS ORIGINALLY THE TERM FOR A COUNTY PERSON BUT THE CURRENT DEFINITION SURE SEEMS TO FIT

“apparently walking outside of the crosswalk”

WELL, IF YOU’RE IN THE MIDDLE OF THE BLOCK ON LOMBARD, THEN YOU’RE WALKING “OUTSIDE OF THE CROSSWALK,” RIGHT?

when he was ”struck by a passing vehicle.”

WELL, HOW ELSE DO YOU SAY THIS?

There was no mention of the driver’s speed.

UH, GEE, THERE WAS NO MENTION OF THE DRIVER’S CURRENT IRS TAX COMPLIANCE NEITHER, RIGHT? SO WHAT? WASN’T THIS PED 100% AT FAULT FOR HIS OWN DEATH? I THINK SO.

(The driver was only mentioned to note that he or she was “very cooperative.”)

WELL, WHAT ELSE DO YOU WANT TO KNOW?

And here’s the latest:

“Correction: Streetsblog SF does have the most Twitter followers of any news source in the Bay Area.”

Oh, but you’re not a Bay Area news source, you’re more like a religion.

Keep on trying StreetsBlog SF. Maybe someday you’ll become a real blog…

What Happens When You Leave Your Van Parked Overnight on the Mean Streets of San Francisco? Art Happens, That’s What

Friday, March 16th, 2012

And then you look at your panel van and say, “Art happens, man.”

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Ooh, Harsh: City Attorney Dennis Herrera Throws Down – Goes After Ed Lee’s Failed Record on Infrastructure

Tuesday, October 18th, 2011

Turns out that our “world-class City” is ranked below Boston, New York, Oakland, San Jose, and Seattle, believe it or not. See below.

Now, just how purple do you want to see your fighting City Attorney.

Better A, as seen here?

Or B, after a little Replace Color and Shadows/Highlights?

You Make The Call.

Now, a little background and then the News of the Day. Let’s list the endnotes first for a change – they are that good:

[1] Government Barometer: August 2011, City and County of San Francisco, Office of the Controller, City Services Auditor, October 18, 2011, http://www.sfcontroller.org/Modules/ShowDocument.aspx?documentid=2581
[2] City and County of San Francisco City Survey 2011, Final Report, prepared by the ETC Institute, October 6, 2011, http://www.sfcontroller.org/Modules/ShowDocument.aspx?documentid=2573
[3] Voter Information Pamphlet, Nov. 8, 2011, Proposition B: Road Repaving and Street Safety Bonds, page 46, http://www.sfgov2.org/ftp/uploadedfiles/elections/NOV2011_VIP_EN.pdf
[4] Management Audit of the Department of Public Works, by the San Francisco Budget Analyst, January 9, 2007, http://www.sfdpw.org/ftp/uploadedfiles/sfdpw/director/DPWAuditReport.pdf

The latest from the Dennis Herrera for Mayor campaign:

“New Controller’s report confirms streets survey, audit on Ed Lee’s failed record on infrastructure

Tuesday, October 18th, 2011

Appointed Mayor’s decade-long mismanagement as DPW chief, City Administrator now require quarter-billion dollar streets bond to ‘finally accomplish what Ed Lee didn’t’

SAN FRANCISCO (Oct. 18, 2011) — City streets and public works continue to deteriorate under interim Mayor Ed Lee, according to a new report published today by the Controller’s Office, extending Lee’s decade-long record of mismanagement and neglect as the appointed bureaucrat in charge of San Francisco’s infrastructure. Today’s bimonthly Government Barometer[1] mirrors a highly critical survey released just two weeks ago that found San Francisco’s satisfaction rate with the current quality of its infrastructure to be the lowest among five benchmark cities to which it was compared. Lee’s history of lax oversight of streets, sidewalks and public works projects was also the subject of a devastating independent management audit of the Department of Public Works that the Board of Supervisors first commissioned in May 2005, while Lee was DPW director. That audit was released in 2007.

Today’s new Government Barometer identified negative trends in the City’s maintenance of streets and public works in terms of the percentage of street cleaning requests responded to within 48 hours, which have worsened both since the previous reporting period and as compared to the same period last year. A negative trend was also observed from the previous reporting period for the percentage of graffiti requests on public property responded to within 48 hours.

“For the last decade, Ed Lee did an abysmal job as the person in charge of San Francisco’s infrastructure,” said City Attorney Dennis Herrera. “The Budget Analyst’s audit proved it in 2007; the streets survey proved it again two weeks ago, and the new Government Barometer proves it once again. Ed Lee’s record of failure is why most city streets are dirtier than ever, and in desperate need of major repairs. Now, San Franciscans need to pass a quarter-billion dollars for a streets bond, to finally accomplish what Ed Lee didn’t.”

Lee was DPW director from 2000 to 2005, and until January of this year served as City Administrator, a role whose major duties under the City Charter include coordinating capital improvement and construction projects, and appointing and removing DPW directors. As such, Lee is more responsible for the current state of San Francisco’s infrastructure than any other city official. Lee’s decade-long record contrasts starkly with his new campaign promise to be an “infrastructure mayor” who will fix San Francisco’s “roads, schools and parks.”

On October 6, 2011, the San Francisco Controller’s Office published its final report of the biennial City Survey for 2011[2], which found that:

* San Francisco had the lowest satisfaction rate with the quality of its infrastructure among five benchmark cities to which it was compared: Boston, New York, Oakland, San Jose, and Seattle.

* Overall satisfaction with San Francisco city streets, sidewalks, and infrastructure rated a woeful 31 percent, according to the survey — far below other cities. In fact, San Francisco’s rating for infrastructure was also lower than both statewide and national averages.

* San Franciscans were least satisfied with the condition of pavement citywide, with nearly 44 percent of residents grading city performance “poor/failing,” and another 38 percent describing it as merely “average.” Only 18 percent rated infrastructure “good” or better.

The new Government Barometer and streets survey from two weeks ago come as San Franciscans begin voting on a proposed $248 million bond for road repaving and street safety.[3] The nearly one-quarter-billion-dollars in new bonded indebtedness is required, according to proponents, because half of San Francisco’s 850 miles of streets — together with public structures that include bridges, tunnels, and stairways — need major repairs and upgrades.

Both the Government Barometer and streets survey also mirror a devastating independent audit of DPW that the Board of Supervisors commissioned in May 2005, while Lee was DPW chief. Even before Budget Analyst Harvey Rose’s final 269-page DPW Management Audit[4] was published in January 9, 2007, then-DPW Chief Fred Abadi responded that he “came to DPW after your audit had begun,” and that the report’s 120 recommendations “will prove useful to me as I continue to reengineer parts of the Department.” Abadi agreed and accepted all but three of the Budget Analyst’s 120 recommendations.

Among major findings of the performance audit’s of DPW under Ed Lee:

* DPW’s overall mismanagement, inefficiency and uncollected revenue combined to waste more than $5 million in taxpayer funds.

* DPW-led projects were routinely mismanaged, over-budget, and late — and city street repair projects were late by a shocking 172 days, on average.

* DPW failed to routinely track average project labor costs or productivity to ensure that Street Resurfacing and Pothole Repair Projects were completed efficiently

* DPW could not demonstrate that tax dollars being spent for street repair and maintenance (despite an amount that increased during Lee’s tenure) were spent appropriately.

* DPW allowed more than $1 million in litter fines to go uncollected.

* None of DPW’s eight bureaus fully measured performance to ensure that the bureau achieved the best possible outcomes.

* And DPW inspectors did not conduct routine inspections of streets to identify safety hazards.”

You Don’t Like Bikes on Sidewalks? Well, “Then Put a Flippin Bike Lane on Divisadero!”

Monday, October 10th, 2011

[UPDATE: Oops. Speaking of which, there are a lot of different possibilities for Oak betwixt Baker and Scott. Taking out the parking lane on the south side of Oak is an idea. In the meantime, take the lane. Or head up Baker to Fulton to Divis to McAllister and then roll all the way down to Mid Market and beyond – that way you avoid the horrible part of Octavia and SFPD bike enforcement actions, etc…]

Appears as if Carly Schwartz, Founding editor of Huffington Post San Francisco, has a beef with the Livable Cities / Livable Streets movement, at least as far as Divisadero is concerned:

Then put a flippin bike lane on Divisadero! Thankshttp://bit.ly/nwO7u9

Now that’s interesting because the City, instead of just taking out the useless median on Divisadero, well, the Powers That Be, the City Family, actually went in there a few years back and made the median wider so now there’s less room for bike riders.

See?

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Does it look like, as some say, there’s “excess roadway space” here? Not at all, IRL.

And the sidewalks are like ten feet wide.

So sure, ride your bike on the wide sidewalks of Divis. I mean, I seriously doubt you’ll ever get a ticket.

Or “take the lane,” it’s your choice. (But I don’t advise taking the lane on Divisadero, uphill or down, personally.)

So, how do we fix the horrible thing our City Family and the Livable City movement just inflicted on the Commonweal?

Well, how about narrowing the fast lane to make the slow lane wider?

Or, how about narrowing the median to the width you’ll find north of Geary and then taking out the useless vegetation?

Or, how about just taking out the whole damn useless median? What’s that, it would cost $$$ to move the light standards? Well, get some money from the Feds. Didn’t they just pay money to fuck up Divisadero just a few years back? I think so. So maybe they’d pay to take the light standards out of the middle of the street and put them in the comparatively wide sidewalks of Divis. You know, shovel ready, jobs jobs jobs! What’s that, local businesses and area NIMBYs and real estate interests prefer the trees in the useless median and other aesthetic stuff? Well, who put them in charge?

(Or, maybe we could narrow the wide sidewalks, but that would cost even more.)

So maybe Divis doesn’t deserve a bike lane, but how about just giving back the space that was taken for useless trees?

Wouldn’t that be a start?