Posts Tagged ‘streetscape’

Our US Postal Service Gets an Early Start with Parking in the New Bike Lanes of Masonic Avenue

Monday, November 27th, 2017

And this lengthy project isn’t even done yet:

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Where will these trucks park after completion?

– The slow lane, leaving just one for MUNI and cars?

– The slightly elevated bike lane, as seen?

– The new overly-wide sidewalks?

– Some yet-to-be-designated delivery vehicle / UBER Lyft dropoff point?

IDK.

 

Test Riding the New and “Improved” Masonic Boulevard – It’s Not Going to be a Night-and-Day Difference, Safetywise

Tuesday, November 21st, 2017

Here you go, heading south, in the downhill direction – you’ve got your new median on the left, your downsized two lanes of traffic, your removed bus stops (so MUNI will just stop in traffic in future), your (slightly) raised cycle track and then your preexisting houses and driveways on the right:

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And here’s your reverse angle:

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So this isn’t much of a difference, safetywise, right?

What else, oh, for the next year or two of construction, we’ll continue to see this kind of half-assed engineering – this is a wheelchair ramp, of sorts:

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Hey, why would bike riders even want to get onto the sidewalks of Masonic? Well, you should try it sometime, as this person ahead of me wisely was doing. (And boy, if you threw in heavy rain and a few epically drunk drivers, the likes of which killed a pedestrian and a bike rider on this stretch of Masonic the past decade or so, well that’d make the sidewalk even more appealing.)

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Those are USF trees you can see on the right in the above photo. This used to be the narrowest sidewalk of Masonic north of Fell, but as you can see it’s quite wide now.

But look, turnabout is fair play, as peds seems to enjoy walking in the new bike path. That’s a bus stop there on the left, complete with a cut out to please Area Residents:

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There are costs and benefits to these changes, of course. It’s too bad that our SFMTA didn’t even try to document them…

The Safety Trees of Masonic – Somehow These New Median Trees from the SFMTA will Increase Safety – Somehow

Friday, November 17th, 2017

On it goes, the changes at the 3000 feet of Masonic north of Fell:

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Here It Is: Your New, Lower Capacity Masonic Avenue, with a Median and Twee Streetlamps

Tuesday, September 26th, 2017

(We’re gonna rock on down to ‘Sonic Avenue, and then we’ll take it higher.)

Looking north from Hayes. The medians will end up with trees, and looks like a few easier-to-see traffic signals as well:

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Looking south from Hayes. The median ends early here, perhaps in deference to the SFFD’s nearby Engine 21 on Grove, IDK:

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IDK if these trees will survive:

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Here are your old-school streetlight amenities. I guess this is meant to please area homeowners. (The similarly brand-new, old-school benches down the hill aren’t really working out, oh well.)

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Here’s what looks to be a bus island with a bike lane on the right side. MUNI buses will simply stop in traffic, leaving this part of Masonic with one lane:

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Here’s your reverse angle, looking towards Fulton:

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Old sidewalk and trees to the right, new sidewalk added in the middle, new bike lane further left, and then the new median:

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And there you have it.

The Great Median of Masonic is Upon Us

Wednesday, August 30th, 2017

I don’t exactly agree with those who wanted this new median, but nobody asked me.

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The relatively new one on nearby Divisidero hasn’t worked out.

Here It Is, a New Bike Lane for the Vaunted SFMTA “Streetscape” “Improvement” Project on Masonic

Wednesday, August 23rd, 2017

Here’s the west side of Masonic betwixt Hayes and Grove these days:

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This doesn’t seem like much, this doesn’t seem like much of a “transformation” of this windswept corridor:

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Are old people going to hug each other more? I guess? Actually, all these people look like they just scored, or are about to score, or want to score with you, Gentle Reader:

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It’ll be the Miracle of Masonic! Or something.

Anyway, the primary effect will be more congested rush hours and fewer bike riders on the sidewalks.

But we’ll see.

In the meantime, feel free to continue to ride on the excessively wide sidewalks, where they exist, depending on conditions. And by that I mean the hilly blocks north of Fulton in particular. 

You know, like this:

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That’s the choice that most people make. Some transition back to the street after passing McAllister, Golden Gate and Turk. Others cruise all the way to Anza, where the existing sidewalk turns normal. Downhill is a different story of course. Most stay in the street the whole way. I tend to wait at Mcallister and then start coasting when I know I’ll pass Fulton with a green. (This kind of bike riding isn’t “comfortable,” mindless, thoughtless bike riding for ages ranged 8 to 80, but I’m not sure this stated goal will be attained whenever this pork barrel project gets completed. We’ll see.)

That not very busy sidewalk you see above will get even wider, and a median will go in so that will push the two lanes of traffic to the right a bit. I don’t know what’s going to happen to the trees. Maybe they’ll stay. (Of course, the ones that made up a small grove near the MUNI stop on Geary inbound at Masonic have already gotten the chop, for some related art project, oh well.)

And all these plans are just a guess, as I don’t keep up.  Maybe they’ll get done next year? IDK

A Protest at the Masonic Avenue “Streetscape” “Improvement” Project: “SAVE THIS SIDE STREET & PARKING SPACES”

Friday, June 16th, 2017

On It Goes…

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Propaganda Watch: Masonic Avenue “Streetscape” Project Roundup

Friday, May 27th, 2016

Well, here’s the news:

$26 million plan to slow speeding traffic on SF’s Masonic Avenue

This piece is surprisingly evenhanded.

Hey, does any other government agency in Frisco spend so much time and energy promoting itself as the SFMTA? I can’t think of one.

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So we’re going to take out the old trees that are already here to put in L.A. style trees and this is going to Change Everything? IDTS.

(Fundamentally, the SFMTA isn’t a safety agency, it’s an employment agency, oh well.)

But we’ll just have to wait and see how things shake out, add up all the pros and cons maybe a year or so after things get finished. Masonic won’t be changed all that much – it will still be slow and congested, more so, actually, and there will still be accidents. It’s not going to become an Injury-Free Vision Zero Corridor, with or without trees. Sorry.

Anyway, here’s some SFMTA propaganda that we pay for:

Masonic Ave Transformation Breaks Ground in June

  1. This project will not “transform” Masonic. It’ll basically be the same.
  2. Masonic will not end up being “much safer.”And nearby areas will become less safer, right? How will this all add up? We’ll see…
  3. The sewer system underneath is not “centuries-old.”
  4. How does the SFMTA know now when this lengthy project will end by “the end of 2017?” It doesn’t.
  5. Masonic is not “one of the flattest streets in the area.”
  6.  Masonic will not become “safer and better for everyone.”
  7.  Masonic doesn’t prioritize “only car traffic” currently.
  8.  All long, busy streets in Frisco qualify as “high injury corridors,” so that doesn’t make it “distinct” in any way, shape or form.
  9.  Question-time: Are severely drunk drivers killing people on Masonic a human behavior problem or a streetscape problem?
  10. Uh, Vision Zero 2024 promises to eliminate all transportation-related injuries by 2024 and in perpetuity. This impossible “goal” will never be attained, certainly not for all the Streets of San Francisco and certainly not for this 3000 foot stretch of Masonic, so VZ2024 is the wrong way of looking at things, sry. It’s more a marketing thing. Framing they call it. We’ll have a new vocabulary by the time 2024 rolls around, I can promise you that.
  11. So if 501 “neighbors” now signed a petition to cancel this project, the SFMTA would then do that?
  12. Oh boy, here comes the laundry list at the bottom. This project will slow down MUNI during the morning and evening drives – that’s one of the “main trade-offs.” Of course, our SFMTA turned down the chance to test things out by shutting down the rush hour lanes for a day, oh well.
  13. Hey, will rejiggering street parking on Turk “increase safety” on Turk? We’ll see.
  14. “Residential Parking Area Q” is basically a jobs program for MUNI. We could talk about that sometime.

Our Sad-Sack SFMTA, a Part of the SFGov, Violates SF’s Sign Posting Rules to Advertise Itself to You

Monday, May 16th, 2016

Here are the rules you have to obey.

And now here comes our SFMTA to remind you how great the SFMTA is:

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I’ll tell you, I’m meh about this project for the 3000 feet of Masonic betwixt Fell and Geary and I’d still be meh about it even if the money earmarked came from planet Mars for free and even if all the work required could be done in just one day.

I don’t think Masonic will be “transformed.” I don’t think we’ll end up with a “new” Masonic.

I don’t think I like our SFMTA promoting itself like this…

Anyway, our SFMTA seta a bad example, but here are the rules what applies to you, Joan Q. Public:

“Tips for legally posting signs on public property

To legally place a sign on a utility pole, it must:

Be less than 11 inches in height

No higher than 12 feet from the ground

Conform to the shape of the pole

Be attached with tape or other non-adhesive material such as twine, string or other non-metal banding material

Include a legible posting date in the lower right hand corner

Be removed after 10 days, if the sign is promoting a date specific event

Be removed within 70 days of the posting date

Not be installed on historic street light poles*, traffic signal poles or traffic directional sign poles.

* Historic street light poles are on these streets:

Market Street from 1 Market to 2490 Market

Mission Street from 16th Street to 24th Street

Grant Avenue from Bush Street to Broadway Street

The Embarcadero from King Street to Jefferson Street

Lamp Posts on Fisherman’s Wharf from Hyde to Powell

Howard Street from 3rd Street to 4th Street

Lamp Posts within Union Square

Mason Street from Market to Sutter

Sutter Street from Mason to Kearny

Kearny Street from Bush to Market

This Double-Parked Moving Van is a Preview of the Coming “Improved” Masonic Avenue During Rush Hour

Monday, August 24th, 2015

There are proper ways of moving furniture into and out of a place on Masonic, but this method…

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…isn’t one of them. Dudes were here for a good long time on a relatively quiet Saturday afternoon.

Of course there are pros and cons to the coming changes to Masonic, but one thing’s for sure – the backups are going to be epic.