Posts Tagged ‘study’

SFMTA Study Mocks Rideshare Services with a Joking Reference to “KidnapMe.Org”

Tuesday, June 16th, 2015

This study from 2013 is sort of obsolete already, but here you go, page ii:

While initial limousine entrants such as Uber appear to maintain high standards in screening and supervising their drivers, it is only a matter of time before incidents and problems surface, especially among later entrants who may seek to compete on a price basis. We do not want to reach the stage where a San Franciscan inadvertently requests a ride through kidnapme.org.* (*This domain name was not in use at the time of writing.)”

There seems to be a lack of awareness about crimes committed by SFMTA-licensed taxi drivers in San Francisco, is all I’m saying.

In any event, that URL is still available in 2015:

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Unsurprisingly.

Our wayward teenager, the SFMTA, fails us every day, so it probably shouldn’t be funding the jocularity you can see above.

To review, here are its service standards. And feel free to look for any “ACCOUNTABILITY,” as there isn’t any, even when the SFMTA gets caught lying about how much it fails to meet its minimum “STANDARDS.”

Oh well.

SEC. 8A.103. SERVICE STANDARDS AND ACCOUNTABILITY

(a) The Municipal Railway shall be restored as soon as practicable to a level of service measured in service hours which is not less than that provided under the schedule of service published in the April 1996 timetable, although not necessarily in that configuration.

(b) No later than July 1, 2000, and by July 1 of each year thereafter, the Agency shall adopt milestones for the achievement of the goals specified in subsections (c) and (d). Milestones shall be adopted for each mode of transportation of the Municipal Railway, and for the Municipal Railway as a whole, with the goal of full achievement of the standards set in subsection (c) no later than July 1, 2004.

(c) The standards for the Agency with respect to the services provided by the Municipal Railway shall include the following minimum standards for on­time performance and service delivery:

1. On­time performance: at least 85 percent of vehicles must run on­time, where a vehicle is considered on­time if it is no more than one minute early or four minutes late as measured against a published schedule that includes time points; and

2. Service delivery: 98.5 percent of scheduled service hours must be delivered, and at least 98.5 percent of scheduled vehicles must begin service at the scheduled time.

(d) The standards for both managers and employees of the Agency with respect to the services provided by the Municipal Railway shall also include other measurable standards for system reliability, system performance, staffing performance, and customer service, including:

1. Passenger, public, and employee safety and security;

2. Coverage of neighborhoods and equitable distribution of service;

3. Level of crowding;

4. Frequency and mitigation of accidents and breakdowns;

5. Improvements in travel time, taking into account adequate recovery and lay-over times for operators;

6. Vehicle cleanliness, including absence of graffiti;

7. Quality and responsiveness of customer service;

8. Employee satisfaction;

9. Effectiveness of the preventive maintenance program; and

10. Frequency and accuracy of communications to the public.

(e) The performance measures adopted in Section 4 of this measure shall be published as rules of the Agency and utilized to determine the achievement of the performance standards and milestones adopted by the Agency for the Municipal Railway. The performance measures shall be subject to amendment after public hearing by a vote of the Agency board. The Agency shall regularly publish reports on its attainment of those standards and milestones. Nothing herein shall prohibit the Agency from using additional performance measures.

Uh Oh, the SFPD’s Vaunted “Focus on the Five” Enforcement Program Focuses on the Wrong Five

Tuesday, February 24th, 2015

Work with me here, people.

Here you go:

“Focus on the Five – Using multi-year collision data, the San Francisco Police Department (SFPD) is focusing on enforcing the five violations that are most frequently cited in collisions with people walking. The goal is to have half their traffic citations be for these five violations.”

All right, well let’s look at the stats for last year, via Heather Knight / the District 5 Diary.

And then let’s extract all the five-digit CVC section numbers cited in the official SFPD report, plus let’s also throw in a CVC number for the pedestrian who died last year after getting hit by a MUNI bus on Geary around Baker.

(And let’s ignore all the the lower-case subsections like 21950(b) and the like, treating 21950(a) and 21950(b) as the same violation, for example.)

And then lets throw all the extracted numbers into Excel for a Sorting.

And then let’s eyeball the numbers to separate them out:

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So those are your top “five violations that are most frequently cited in collisions with people walking (and bicycle riding, but I don’t think that affects the numbers too much.)

Here they are, in order of frequency:

21950

22350

21456

21954

21955

So how does that compare with this list from politicians?

“Focus on the 23 Five” campaign to target the top five causal factors of pedestrian crashes – running red lights 24 (California Vehicle Code 21453(a)), running stop signs (California Vehicle Code 22450(a)), violating pedestrian right-of-way (California Vehicle Code 21950(a)), failing to yield while 2 turning (California Vehicle Code 21801 (a), and speeding (California Vehicle Code 22350)…

See how that works? 21950 and 22350 are in there, but CVC violations on the part of pedestrians, like 21456, 21954, and 21955 have been omitted from the list.

Is the official “Focus on the Five” about pedestrian safety or “pedestrian rights?”

I’m thinking it’s about pedestrian rights, like the right to jaywalk, that kind of thing.

Is SFGov serious about SF Vision Zero 2024, a “program” that has the goal of ending all transportation deaths in San Francisco long after all the pols who voted for it have termed out?

Well, how can it be if it’s afraid to enforce traffic laws for political reasons?

If you want safety for pedestrians, wouldn’t you want them to be afraid of getting cited for jaywalking?

No? All right, well then keep on doing what you’re doing, but you’ll never ever achieve Vision Zero 2024 the way you’re going about it, SFGov.

(more…)

Sign of the Times: Recession-Era “Dine About Town” Renamed as “SF RESTAURANT WEEK” – Max Price is $85, a 130% Increase

Monday, January 12th, 2015

Hey, you want a government program that actually works? How about requiring all restaurants to post their hygiene letter grades on a big poster at the main entrance, the way they do down in SoCal?

Take a look:

“In 1998, the County of Los Angeles set out to create a report card grading the hygiene of all restaurants. Phillip Leslie, associate professor of strategic management at Stanford GSB, saw the new law as an opportunity to study the effects of information on consumers and on market outcome. “We wanted to look at how responsive consumers were to that information and whether that translated to responsiveness by restaurants to improve product quality,” says Leslie.

“What he found was overwhelming evidence that not only did consumers change their behavior once the ratings became public by frequenting restaurants with better scores, but restaurants also improved their hygiene levels. And he saw an additional benefit: fewer hospitalizations due to food-related illnesses. “We found that better information causes a change in the behavior of restaurants and consumers, and resulted in an improvement in public health,” says Leslie.

Now that you’re up to speed, here’s the kicker:

He also found the new system had an apparent impact on restaurant-goers’ health. Leslie studied data from the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development detailing the number of people admitted to hospitals with specific illnesses. What he found was that hospital admissions for food-related illnesses fell 13 percent from the previous year for people living in Los Angeles, while they rose 3.2 percent in the rest of state. Overall, there were 20 percent fewer food-related hospitalizations in LA than the area would have been expected to experience if the grades had not been introduced.

Now, do you think that San Francisco Mayor Willie Brown and/or any of his appointed minions, like Gavin Newsom or Ed Lee, think that this kind of letter grade requirement would be good for San Francisco? IDK. But so far nobody has dared to defy the Golden Gate Restaurant Association, which super doesn’t want letter grades posted for tout le monde to see, even though such a requirement would boost sales overall, and have an even greater benefit for those who don’t skirt the rules set out by SFGov.

Oh well.

But I digress.

Hey, here are the new deets for SAN FRANCISCO RESTAURANT WEEK. (Or take a look at this  well-reported Annie Sciacca bit from last month, if you want the complete history.)

Observations:

The GGRA has taken over “Dine About Town” from the local tourist organization and this is going to CHANGE EVERYTHING? OK, maybe, we’ll see.

The top price for this program has gone up 130%? Yep. Boy, that sure is restaurateur-friendly, huh?

And the $xx.99 pricing scheme now goes to $xx.00? My, how posh we are.

And what’s this? “San Francisco has the best restaurant community anywhere. Full stop.” Really? Not New York? Not Paris? Not Rome? Not Tokyo? My, how provincial we are.

OTOH, “Restaurant Week” sounds like we’re simply copying other towns in order to sound more “world class.” And of course, it won’t be an actual week, so we’ll be 43% more world-class than everybody else!

And we need $85 deals to allow restaurateurs to “highlight farmer relationships [and] winemaker partnerships…” Like they don’t do that enough on their own already?

And what’s this, a “family-style whiskey-themed dinner?” We’ll be just like Italy!

ASSIGNMENT DESK: Why did the GGRA take control of DAT from SFT? What was wrong with the program before? (IDK myself. This one would write itself, huh?)

I propose a RESTAURANT YEAR, a year in which restaurateurs learn to accept the realities behind that Stanford study and relent on the letter grade issue. Oh what’s that, Yelp has the numerical scores hidden away so that they’re hard to see? No, what we need are simple old-school letter grades posted for all to see.

All right, here it is. Enjoy:

“SAN FRANCISCO RESTAURANT WEEK

January 21 @ 10:00 am – January 30 @ 10:00 pm
SAN FRANCISCO RESTAURANT WEEK IS BACK AND BETTER THAN EVER!

(Under new leadership and with new program updates.)

San Francisco has the best restaurant community anywhere. Full stop. Imagine 10 days of celebrating that. This is the first year that the Golden Gate Restaurant Association has taken the reigns of SF Restaurant Week (a program formerly known as Dine About Town – presented by San Francisco Travel). Based on diner feedback, we gave the program a few updates and are excited to share the addition of a new charity partner: the SF-Marin Food Bank. We’re thrilled to re-introduce you to the new SF Restaurant Week and get your support building this into the ultimate celebration of our diverse restaurant landscape.

During Restaurant Week diners can choose from:

$25 – 2 Course Lunch Menu

$40 – 3 Course Dinner Menu

AND NEW THIS YEAR:

$85 Discovery (tasting) Menu – This is a new menu offering available at select restaurants designed to inspire restaurants’ creativity and delight diners. Look for menus that highlight farmer relationships, winemaker partnerships, special dishes or cocktails, or a chef’s vivid imagination.

Sneak Peek: Great Discovery Menu plans are in the works. Hog & Rocks will be doing a family style whiskey themed dinner in partnership with High West Whiskey. ThirstyBear Brewing Co. is planning a beer themed dinner with food made with beer. We’ll reveal Ichi Sushi + Ni Bar, RN74, AQ and a number of others’ Discovery Menus soon! Stay tuned…

When is San Francisco Restaurant Week?

San Francisco Restaurant Week is a 10 day celebration from January 21 – 30, 2015. Why do we call it Restaurant Week? Because ‘Restaurant 10 Days’ just didn’t sound as good.

How do I find out which restaurants are participating?

We are curating a fabulous group of restaurants that reflect our unique and diverse culinary community. You will be able to see the list of participating restaurants and the menus they will be offering here on this website on January 5th, 2015. In the meantime, visit our Facebook page (join the event!) and see a sneak peek of who is participating and some of the dishes and experiences that will be on offer.

Should I make a reservation?

Yes! Not only to make sure you get to try all of the fabulous menus at the places you want to visit but also because $0.25 of every cover sold through OpenTable bookings will benefit the SF-Marin Food Bank. Your planning ahead is good for you, good for restaurants, and good for the Food Bank. We’re all for that, and think you should be too.

What’s in it for me?

A city-wide celebration with special menus isn’t enough? Ok, we’ll throw in a few extra goodies. We’ll be rewarding the most enthusiastic diners (those that eat at at least 4 or more participating restaurants during Restaurant Week) with 12 – $100 gift certificates. We’ll be collecting photo entries on our Facebook page. More details on that soon…

Color Study: 7-Up Soda Truck Shows More of a Mint Green These Days

Friday, November 21st, 2014

You know, instead of a lime green:

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UCSF Update: Teens Aged 14-18 Who Are Receiving Depression Treatment May Join a Novel 12-Week Program at the OCIM

Tuesday, October 21st, 2014

TARA Study: Training of Attention and emotion Regulation in Adolescents with depression

The UCSF TARA study is seeking adolescents age 14-18 for a 6-month study that may include a novel 12-week depression program.  Depressed teens may learn yoga, breathing and meditation techniques to learn to slow down, feel more safe and calm, regulate emotions, and improve attention and focus.

There is no cost to participate. Participants will be paid $140 for 4 study visits over 6 months and may be eligible for $200 more for additional study procedures.

Must be 14-18 years old and receiving depression treatment. Participation requires parental or guardian permission (unless age 18).

For more information about the study and eligibility, please call 415-353-9723.

Read the Consent Form (Word or PDF) for more details on study participation.”

The Horrible Pedestrians of Masonic Avenue – See How They Run – A Darwin Award Loser

Monday, July 30th, 2012

Here’s how some people cross six lanes of Masonic at Ewing Terrace:

Click to expand

Now, is this kind of thing legal? Well sure, if you’re walking – this could be one of those unmarked crosswalk deals.

But it’s not legal to cross here if you’re running. Sorry pedestrian.

(Our FUBARed beyond all reason SFMTA has a plan to put a traffic light in here whenever it can get its grand mal Masonic Street Design off the ground.)

Now a little further up the hill, we lost a ped who was similarly jaywalking earlier this year. I guess we could blame accidents like that the 30 MPH speed limit in front of Trader Joe’s, but that’s not how I’d look at it.

I’d look at it by trying to get inside the peds’ heads to try to think of a way to get them to not kill themselves.

Oh well.

Masonic Avenue Street Design Study

Engineering hearing on proposed changes, May 13, 2011

Masonic Street Redesign Study final report (PDF)

The survey results from the third community meeting, held on September 30, 2010, at San Francisco Day School (PDF), are available.

About the Project

The primary goal of the Masonic Avenue Street Design Study is to identify how Masonic Avenue between Geary Boulevard and Fell Street can safely and efficiently accommodate the needs of all roadway users, including but not limited to pedestrians, bicyclists, motorists and Muni. The project is funded by the San Francisco County Transportation Authority through the Prop K half-cent local transportation sales tax program.

Objectives:

1. Engage representatives of all constituencies within the community who would be impacted by changes to Masonic Avenue including, but not limited to, residents on Masonic Avenue, residents on side-streets, merchants, school representatives, bicyclists, Muni customers and pedestrians.

2. Improve transit operation.

3. Improve pedestrian and non-motorized access to transit.

4. Increase the safety of pedestrian crossings.

5. Increase motorist compliance with traffic rules and regulations.

6. Reduce the number of vehicular collisions, especially those involving pedestrians and bicyclists.

7. Support neighborhood vitality by creating a more inviting and accommodating public realm.

Community meeting presentations

The following presentations from the various community meetings are available from the San Francisco Planning Department website:

First community meeting presentation, June 15, 2010, Day School, PDF, 7MB
Second community meeting presentation, Aug. 10, 2010, Day School, PDF, 7MB
Third community meeting presentation, Sept. 30, 2010, Day School, PDF, 6MB

James Shahamiri
415.701.4732
james.shahamiri@sfmta.com

Can’t We All Get Along: Google Maps Bike There Blog Makes the Case for Bikes on Sidewalks

Tuesday, August 16th, 2011

Right here.

I don’t know, you might buy it.

Happy California Street, where ped and cyclist coexist:

Click to expand

Oh, here are the rules for cycling on sidewalks:

  1. GO SLOW – This is the chief of all rules for riding on the sidewalk. All the other rules fall under this one. You should never ride faster than a relaxed jog. The sidewalk is built for pedestrians, so you should not be going faster than them. Pedaling fast down the sidewalk is a perfect way to get hurt, hurt someone else or get pulled over by a cop.
  2. Yield to pedestrians – If you come up behind people walking, be very polite and wait for a good time to ask them to let you pass. Never come up behind them yelling, ringing a bell or anything else that could startle or scare them. You are trespassing on their terrain so be courteous.
  3. Check every cross street and driveway – This is the dangerous part! Drivers are used to pulling all the way up to the road before coming to a stop and turning onto the street you’re following. Make sure when coming up to a driveway or cross street that you slow down and check to make sure a car isn’t coming. They aren’t looking for fast moving vehicles to be coming off the sidewalk, so you have to be watching for them!
  4. Only cross the street at crosswalks – A good way to get hit by a car is to come darting off the sidewalk into the street randomly. Again, remember that drivers aren’t looking for people to jump off the sidewalks into traffic randomly. If you need to cross the street, wait until you get to a cross walk and do it there.
  5. Be willing to walk your bike – If you regularly ride on the sidewalk, there are going to be lots of times where the best decision is to get off your bike and walk for a bit. This is usually due to congestion. When there is just to many people around that you risk hitting one of them, it’s time to walk. Constantly keep it in your mind that you can get off your bike and walk if things seem “iffy”.

Don’t Bother Attacking the Installation Workers, SmartMeters are Already Here in San Francisco

Friday, January 21st, 2011

See? Despite what the headlines say, they’re here right now. They’ve been radiating away in town for so long they’re dusty and stuff. And you haven’t died yet, right?

Remember when Arnold Schwarzenegger wanted to bend the rules in order to spray you with chemicals from the air in order to fight the Light Brown Apple Moth in order to protect some industry that you don’t give a whit about? Well, that was a different situation, we can talk about that sometime.

But SmartMeters, they can’t hurt you. Yes, even you, even if you are “especially sensitive” to SmartMeters.

So don’t throw yourself in front of the fleet of trucks coming down Lombard or anything. You should allow the installation workers to come onto your propertah, cause, you know, you have nothing to fear.

And if anybody tells you any different, they are, best case scenario, patronizing you

As seen in San Francisco back in 2010, broadcasting your private personal information about how much of the G in PG&E you’ve been using. The ‘lectricity SmartMeters look a little  different:

Jack DAngelo likes:

When they knock on your front door
How you gonna come?
With your hands on your head
Or on the trigger of your gun?

Turns Out that Wireless PG&E SmartMeters WON’T Kill You – Imagine That!

Wednesday, January 12th, 2011

If I thought there were a chance in Hell that you could possibly be hurt by microwave RF radiation from a PG&E SmartMeter, I might feel differently about this whole issue.

Anyway, you all wanted a study, so you got a study, right?

As seen on Van Ness:

So, if you want to fight the Battle of New Orleans, be my guest.

But this one is case closed…

Next!

Earn $40 Per Hour at Stanford’s Study For Mom’s Who Have Had Depression And Who Have a Daughter Aged 10-14

Thursday, December 16th, 2010

This deal is kind of a rip-off because you and your kin have to visit Stanfoo three times and you might only get $80 for the both of you.

Seems as if MUNI might make more money on this affair than the participants.

(Maybe if they actually paid the moms/daughters a fair amount for their time, it would warp the study or something.)

Oh well.

Click to expand

“Moms and Daughters Wanted for Paid fMRI Brain Scan Research at Stanford

Are you a mother with a daughter who is 10-14 years old? Have you had episodes of depression during adulthood?

If so, you may be eligible to participate in a study of how moms and their children think and process emotional information. The study takes place in the Psychology Department at Stanford University. You and your daughter would participate in interviews, fill out questionnaires, and have a scan taken of your daughter’s brain.

Eligible mother-child pairs will receive $40/hour for their time. The study would last from 2-6 hours over the course of two or three visits. We will schedule the sessions around your availability (daytime, evenings, or weekends are all fine).

To be eligible for this study:
** you must have a daughter between the ages of 10-14
** you must be a US citizen or non-citizen with a Green Card
** you must read and speak English
** you should have no immediate plans to leave the Bay Area

If you would like to receive more information about this study, please email mood@psych.stanford.edu or call (650) 723-0804 to reach the study coordinator, Hannah Burley. Please refer to study #287. For general information about participant rights, contact 1-866-680-2906. Thank you.