Posts Tagged ‘sucks’

Septemberfest? Hurray for Oktoberfest by the Bay, Which Will Have Lower Ticket Prices for 2010

Friday, September 10th, 2010

I’m already on the record about my opinion of Oktoberfest by the Bay, that annual joint held at Pier 48 in the SoMA. However, I’m compelled to cheer about that fact that this year’s event (which, for some reason, will go down in September, from the 23rd to the 26th) will have slightly lower ticket pricing.

It’s up to you all to decide: OBTB, Is It Worth It?

(I’ll also note that their Yelp rating is fairly low, despite some fairly obvious five-star shilling from 20% of the Yelpers voting.)

Click to expand

Anyway, hurray for lower pricing. And check out their coupon/discount deals on the less popular days.

As always, be on the look out for the Jagermeister Jagerettes:

via Augie Schwer

They’ll be sure to have expensive test tubes full of der Jager for sale, assuming they show this year:

Or you can go the cheap route and get pre-loaded before entrance. Your choice:

via YoHandy

See you there! (Maybe.)

Gemutlichkeit Night
Thursday, September 23, 2010 — $25 Admission includes the first beer and a Bratwurst in a bun dinner. We can even reserve tabes for groups of ten or more!Gemutlichkeit Night
 Fabulous Friday!
$10 Off Admission
Friday, September 24, 2010 — Grab your friends and head down after work.Use promo code: oktoberFabulous Oktoberfest Fridays
 German Day Sunday
2-for-1 or 50% Off Tickets
Sunday, September 26, 2010 — Fun for the whole family.Use promo code: funday2-for-1 Oktoberfest Sunday

Ultra Motor’s A2B Electric Bike, the Worst Consumer Product of 2009, Spotted in 2010

Monday, August 9th, 2010

Well well, has it really been a half-year since an example of the ridiculous, overweight and overpriced A2B electric bike / moped thing has been spotted on the Streets of San Francisco? Yes.

Here’s the one sighted yesterday. It’s a rental of course, but actually, that’s not a bad thing. Assuming you don’t run out of juice, renting an A2B for 69 bones doesn’t appear to be a bad way to spend a day exploring the 415 . You could easily haul on over to Sausalito (remembering to pretend to pedal – the Golden Gate Bridge people actually require this) and back without breaking a sweat.

See? 

(Take care it doesn’t get stolen, though, else they’ll charge your credit card an arm and a leg.)

O.K. then.

Now I’ll tell you, most of the people who comment about the posts made about the A2B on this website actually work (or worked) for Ultra Motor.

For example, here’s a bit from Ultra Motor Co-Founder and President Jon Bowman from earlier this year:

“Wow. You really have nothing better to do than attack what appears to be a good idea and an innovative product.”

Does that make sense? He’s berating me for criticising one of his P.O.S. products from the standpoint of someone who doesn’t work for Ultra Motor, yet he works for Ultra Motor. (Reminds me of when people at the San Francisco Chronicle Newspaper would make comments on SFist claiming to work full-time for MUNI or something. They weren’t really fooling anybody…)

Anyway, a newer product Ultra Motor has is called the Excel and it’s being marketed as a $5000 electric scooter. O.K., if it makes you happy. 

The big problem with all these bikes is that they don’t sell. The fact that you have to fork over $2200 plus tax, minimum, to buy one (unless you get a deal through Craigslist ) is merely the first problem. It’s not the only problem, not at all. (Now, they have this newer model, the Velocity (Velociti?) but I ain’t never seen one of those – maybe it’s closer to being an actual electric bike…)

Oh well. Even the people who like these things don’t really like these things.

If you want an electric bike, get a Trek or something else.

What Does This Photo of a 38 Geary Bus Stop Tell You About MUNI and San Francisco?

Thursday, July 1st, 2010

Do you think that the people who installed the tree, the garbage can, the bus shelter/ad, and the curved stone walkway (on land that belongs to the nearby apartment complex) were all working together on this one?

I don’t. But at least the forgotten peds have the patio pavers now so they don’t have to walk through mud anymore… 

Looking west into the pouring sun:

There’s a feeling I get/  When I look to the west/ And my spirit is crying for leaving Click to expand

I mean, MUNI sucks, right? Don’t the people at MUNI know that by now?

The Good and the Bad of 60 Minutes’ Big Story About the San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge

Monday, April 26th, 2010

60 Minutes just aired its big been-two-decades-after-Loma-Prieta-so-why-isn’t-the-Bay-Bridge-fixed-yet bit. It was mostly good, but let’s start with the bad:

“But they may not know their most important lifeline to the outside world is also one the weakest: the Bay Bridge connecting San Francisco to Oakland.”

The Bay Bridge isn’t a “lifeline to the outside world,” of course.

Then there’s this:

 ”In 2004, Caltrans finished replacing half a million rivets with bolts and added 17 million tons of extra steel.”

Really, 34 billion pounds of steel? Isn’t that a lot? Wouldn’t that weigh more than every person in the western U.S.? Yes. How about 17 million pounds instead? (That’s a screaming error of more than three orders of magnitude. Journalists, when throwing about large numbers, try not to exceed three orders of magnitude. Of course, you should feel free to continue substituting million for billion and vice versa, I mean, they’re both big – they’re practically the same thing, right? Moving on…)

Now, speaking of bad, what about the workers who seem to have all the time in the world to spend tagging our cracked bridge instead of finding more cracks?

via CalTrans, actually

But hey, what about the good?

Well, there’s this:

“But the decision to build an architectural icon didn’t end problems – it started new ones. The most bizarre was with the U.S. Navy. In 1998, it refused to let Caltrans onto Yerba Buena Island to finish its engineering work. The Navy’s issue was whether the Bridge would overshadow the one-time home of Admiral Chester Nimitz, a hero of World War II.”

Did not know that. I knew there were some kinds of probs but I didn’t know that this was one of them. Bad form, U.S. Navy. Do you think old Ches cares about building shadows? I don’t. 

And then there’s this:

“But for those who would say, ‘How dare you take that risk with the lives of people who live in this community,’ you say what?” Pitts asked.

Of course the interviewer didn’t get an answer, but thanks for asking.

Our tough old Bay Bridge has handled stuff like container ship and military jet crashes over the years. Let’s hope it can survive state, federal, and local government mismanagement for just a little longer.

Hold on, Bay Bridge. Hold on.

Actual Trauma on the Set of NBC’s Trauma – Star Aimee Garcia Busts Her Finger

Wednesday, March 17th, 2010

Lovely “Helicopter Hero” Aimee Garcia had a mishap a few days back in San Francisco while filming a scene for new (and improved?) Trauma.

As she recently related to NBC’s Natalie Morales:

“I was doing a scene where my ex-military boyfriend gets in a fight, and it was scripted that I just stand there … I just got involved. I pulled one actor off of another and they loved it. They said, ‘Keep doing it.’ We did it 12 times and I didn’t realize on the first take I broke my finger.”

Here’s the video from the Today Show.

A finger mishap always makes for good TV of course, especially when you don’t lie about it.  

Let’s hope Aimee can get her left hand back on that giant twirlypopper’s collective control sooner rather than later.

Courage.

NBC’s Trauma is Back on TV But With the Worst Ratings Ever

Tuesday, March 9th, 2010

Take a look for yourself to see dude just drive off the Bay Bridge due to a moment’s inattention in last night’s episode of NBC’s Trauma serial. (Do you think you’d survive after falling so far inside a Jeep Cherokee Classic? I don’t think it’d be possible, but maybe the breast implants inside the car softened the jolt or something.)

Yesterday’s relaunch, debuting the first new ep since November 2009, earned ratings of 1.4/3, which are 22% lower than last year’s average for the show.

Shooting in North Beach as it looked last year near the top of Kearny Street, the most-filmed block on any street in Northern California:

Anyway the bad ratings add up to trouble, according to The Wrap:

“The problem started at 9 p.m., with the previously sorta-canceled “Trauma” (1.4/3) returning from the grave as a Nielsen zombie. It hit its lowest rating yet, falling 22 percent from its fall average and 13 percent from its last original. It wouldn’t be shocking if NBC decided to quickly replace “Trauma” in the timeslot. That’s because “Trauma” tainted “L&O,” which managed a third-place 1.5/4 at 10 p.m. — down 25 percent from last week, when NBC aired a double dose of the drama from 9-11 p.m. Worse, “L&O” was actually off 6 percent from what “The Jay Leno Show” had been averaging at 10 p.m. Mondays.

“NBC — which actually did quite well last week, given the fact that it had to fill 5 hours of primetime post-Jay– does not want to see any negative Leno-to-scripted comparisons at 10 p.m. Period.”

Not saying I would or could do a better job, but maybe the whole concept of shooting this kind of old-school TV show on location on the Streets of San Francisco was a bad idea? Is that possible?

On It Goes. How much longer will this Great San Francisco Nielsen Zombie last?

An Apology From the Star of NBC’s Trauma, Plus New Filming at Oakland Islamic Center

Tuesday, February 16th, 2010

Why, it’s almost as if the people behind NBC’s Trauma serial have figured out a thing or two. Comes now Cliff Curtis, the New Zealand star who plays “cocky” helicopter pilot Rabbit, to say:

“The characters weren’t developed properly at first.

We took a lot of creative license, but learned from it.

We listened to the audience and to critics, and were able to satisfy a lot of complaints about the characters.

We improved the humor and the action on the front line.”

It’s almost like they’re shooting a whole new show! Good on you, Rabbit. Remember how excited people were when gorgeous Jennifer Siebel Newsom was in the pilot episode? Maybe we can get some of that back.

NBC/Universal

Now, while we’re remembering last autumn, wasn’t that the time when co-star Aimee Garcia was spinning this tale

 
O.K., hold on to that one. Now, try this on for size, per a recent interview with Cliff Curtis:
 
“NBC’s freshman “Trauma” series was considered such a sure-shot for early extinction that members of the crew gave up their apartments on San Francisco location.”
 
At The Length Truth Will Out. Moving on…
 
Shooting for, what shall we call it, Trauma II: This Time We Mean It moves to the East Bay tomorrow. Actually, they were looking for extras with Pakistani heritage just the other day. But keep in mind that when you’re an extra working on Treasure Island you get paid $1.79 more per hour than when you’re an extra working in Oakland. Why? It all has to do with the minimum wage. Anyway, you might be too late for this, but there could be other gigs coming up:
 
Mosque scenes will be filmed Wed. 2/17 at a temple in Oakland. Extras will appear to be praying when an older Pakistani woman has a seizure causing the cast member medics to respond.”
  
Take heart, extras - I can recall a time when the minimum wage was a lot less than $64/8-hour day. Oh well.
 
And of course the TV addicts are, once again, talking about how, once again, Trauma is a “goner”.
 
No matter, re-re-newed filming should continue ’til March or April, and then we’ll just have to wait and see, huh?

Jay Leno-Approved A2B Electric Mopeds Appear on the Streets of San Francisco

Thursday, January 21st, 2010

It took a while, but this photo is clear evidence of an A2B electric moped from San Francisco-based Ultra Motor USA apparently being used by a regular San Franciscan. Heretofore, I’ve only seen A2Bs being borrowed by tourists for short-term rentals, or by riders on test drives, or by employees trying to promote the brand, stuff like that.

So this is progress, of a sort.

Let’s see here, yes, that’s an overweight, overpriced A2B Metro being used as designed in San Francisco. Finally.

And here’s something else that’s new – an endorsement from Jay Leno. Check the short video with dressed-for-success(!) (in a camo tank, Daisy Dukes* and high-heeled boots) Ultra Motor “Sales Manager” Shelby Nielsen at advertising-choked JayLenosGarage.com:

Let’s see here. Jay Leno:

Clearly doesn’t understand the concept of voltage. [Conferre this huge 6-volt lantern battery with tiny 9-volt battery next to it - which has more power do you s'pose? Discuss.] 

Thinks the weight of 73 pounds (or is it closer to 90 with the optional $650 battery you can see behind the seat?) ”isn’t bad.” [Actually, it is bad.]

Thinks it’s practical to pedal a moped.

Thinks it’s practical to carry a moped up and down stairs on a daily basis.

Doesn’t care about the price

Believes in helmets for people on motorcycles but not on mopeds, despite the fact that he needed to wear a helmet during his test drive on public streets under CA law.

Here’s the thing – A2B mopeds, like all mopeds, are basically manifestations of  license-and-registration scams. Moped owners don’t have to deal with all the hassles involved of owning a scooter or a motorcycle – that’s the reason for the ridiculous design compromises.

So that’s how it’s going for the first year of these mopeds in the 415.

And to close, let’s review The Law: 

Motorized Bicycle, Electric Motor: Safety and Equipment Requirements

24016.  (a) A motorized bicycle described in subdivision (b) of Section 406 shall meet the following criteria:

(1) Comply with the equipment and manufacturing requirements for bicycles adopted by the Consumer Product Safety Commission (16 C.F.R. 1512.1, et seq.) or the requirements adopted by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (49 C.F.R. 571.1, et seq.) in accordance with the National Traffic and Motor Vehicle Safety Act of 1966 (15 U.S.C. Sec. 1381, et seq.) for motor driven cycles.

(2) Operate in a manner so that the electric motor is disengaged or ceases to function when the brakes are applied, or operate in a manner such that the motor is engaged through a switch or mechanism that, when released, will cause the electric motor to disengage or cease to function.

(b) All of the following apply to a motorized bicycle described in subdivision (b) of Section 406:

(1) No person shall operate a motorized bicycle unless the person is wearing a properly fitted and fastened bicycle helmet that meets the standards described in Section 21212.

(2) A person operating a motorized bicycle is subject to Sections 21200 and 21200.5.

(3) A person operating a motorized bicycle is not subject to the provisions of this code relating to financial responsibility, driver’s licenses, registration, and license plate requirements, and a motorized bicycle is not a motor vehicle.

(4) A motorized bicycle shall only be operated by a person 16 years of age or older.

(5) Every manufacturer of a motorized bicycle shall certify that it complies with the equipment and manufacturing requirements for bicycles adopted by the Consumer Product Safety Commission (16 C.F.R. 1512.1, et seq.).

(c) No person shall tamper with or modify a motorized bicycle described in subdivision (b) of Section 406 so as to increase the speed capability of the bicycle.

Added Sec. 3, Ch. 804, Stats. 1995. Effective January 1, 1996.

Safety Helmet Regulations

27802.  (a) The department may adopt reasonable regulations establishing specifications and standards for safety helmets offered for sale, or sold, for use by drivers and passengers of motorcycles and motorized bicycles as it determines are necessary for the safety of those drivers and passengers. The regulations shall include, but are not limited to, the requirements imposed by Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard No. 218 (49 C.F.R. Sec. 571.218) and may include compliance with that federal standard by incorporation of its requirements by reference. Each helmet sold or offered for sale for use by drivers and passengers of motorcycles and motorized bicycles shall be conspicuously labeled in accordance with the federal standard which shall constitute the manufacturer’s certification that the helmet conforms to the applicable federal motor vehicle safety standards.

(b) No person shall sell, or offer for sale, for use by a driver or passenger of a motorcycle or motorized bicycle any safety helmet which is not of a type meeting requirements established by the department.

Amended Ch. 163, Stats. 1985. Effective January 1, 1986.

*In the “accepted vernacular

25 Percent More Trauma for San Francisco – NBC Approves Another Four Eps of Horrible TV Show

Wednesday, January 20th, 2010

Conan O’Brien’s trauma, that whole deal where he’s losing his Tonight Show gig, is helping to keep NBC’s horrible Trauma serial a few paces ahead of the grim reaper. News just came out about how NBC is ordering four more shows to help fill the prime-time hole left by Jay Leno moving from 10:00 PM back to 11:35 PM

That means that Season One will end up with 20 episodes at the very least.

Will there be a Season Two for Trauma? Only Time Will Tell.

Rest assured, twirlypopper pilot / couch potato Aimee Garcia will still maintain her official website regardless of when Trauma gets cancelled.

header_sm copy copy

Click to expand

Look for more filming around town soon. You’ll have ten fresh episodes available on your idiot panel after the 2010 Olympics end.

Just bide your time until 9:00 PM on Monday, March 8. 2010

Trauma Dies Today: It was Bad for NBC But Was it Good for San Francisco?

Wednesday, November 11th, 2009

Word comes today from Anna Bloom of the NewYork TimesesesBay Area Blog about how production of NBC’s horrible Trauma TV series will shut down tonight.

Certainly, Trauma has been traumatic for NBC, but what about San Francisco? Would we have been better off without subsidizing this inchoate production? Did we really pay SFPD officers to just hang out around the set for the filming of twelve episodes instead of having the cops do their regular jobs? 

Duboce Park as seen by Troy McClure SF. Click to expand:

3870588443_9255b35575_b copy

How does the Scene in San Francisco scheme work? The TV people pay for the cops but then we turn around and give the TV people all the money back?

“What costs are eligible for refund?

  • Fees paid to City Departments for the use or rental of City property, equipment or employees including: Port, MUNI, SPFD [SFPD?], SFFD, DPT, DPW, Treasure Island, Recreation and Parks, and all City buildings
  • All daily use fees paid to the San Francisco Film Commission
  • All payroll taxes paid to the City and County of San Francisco.”

So after Unfortunate, Innocent-Looking Whore In Tube Top and Flip Flops #5 cashes her minimum-wage paycheck for two days of temping (no benefits obviously) and we pay the cops full salary (or full salary plus?) to not do their jobs, what are we left with?

Certainly, Trauma was good for certain people in San Francisco, but was it good for San Francisco and San Franciscans overall? Is this the kind of thing we want to do again? Are there any Lessons to be Learned here?

Mmmmm….