Posts Tagged ‘sun’

Photo: Twin Peaks, Christmas Tree Road, and the Sutro Tower, All Being Flooded with Fog

Tuesday, February 11th, 2014

Carl Sandburg. 1878–

76. Fog

THE fog comes
on little cat feet.

It sits looking
over harbor and city
on silent haunches 
and then moves on.

Click to expand

MISSION: A Double-Decker Bus Driver Stares Into the Sun – We Hates It, We Hates It Forever!

Monday, November 25th, 2013

The Sun that is.

The way some of our streets are lined up, sometimes you end up staring right into El Sol, particularly if you’re driving west in October during the Evening Drive on a rare cloudless day

Click to expand

An Arresting “Snapshot” from Photographer David Yu: Shifting Shafts of Shining Above Alcatraz

Monday, May 6th, 2013

Right here:

Click to expand

All at once the clouds are parted 
Light streams down in bright unbroken beams 
Follow men’s eyes as they look to the skies 
The shifting shafts of shining weave the fabric of their dreams

Wow: A Different Kind of Golden Gate Bridge Sunset Photo – From Famous photographer David Yu

Thursday, March 7th, 2013

(If I ever see the sky this orange, I’ll be sure to call 911, or at least 311, to find out what in the Sam Hill is going on.)

This is an arresting shot, non? 

San Francisco Photographer David Yu does it again:

Click to expand

Wow, the Best Photo of the Bay Bridge I’ve Ever Seen – Another One From Famous Photographer David Yu

Friday, June 22nd, 2012

This is from the western span, you know, the one with the functional towers:

From David Yu – click to expand

Of course, the eastern span, the one they’re still working on decades after the Big One of 1989, will have an ornamental tower. Oh well.

Anyway, this is a nice shot.

 

Wow: Marin Headlands, Golden Gate Bridge, Conzelman, Bay Bridge, Financial District, Sutro Tower, Sunset District and Fog

Sunday, June 3rd, 2012

Fog, fog, fog.

Another great capture from Joe Azure:

Click to expand

 

Sunrise or Moonrise? It’s Hard to Tell the Difference Sometimes – Bleak Morning, McAllister Street, San Francisco, CA

Monday, April 23rd, 2012

Our sun sometimes looks like the moon, on account of the fog.

See?

Click to expand

Assemblymember Tom Ammiano is Sponsoring Free Skin Cancer Screenings at UCSF on Divisadero Tomorrow Saturday, April 21st

Friday, April 20th, 2012

Hey look, it’s free!

And no co-payment neither.

Here’s the crew who’ll be waiting for you, or at least this was the crew at one of UCSF’s recent screenings in Chinatown:

Click to expand

Free Skin Cancer Screening at UCSF

WHAT: In honor of National Skin Cancer Awareness Month, the UCSF Department of Dermatology is offering free skin cancer screenings. The event is co-sponsored by Assemblyman Tom Ammiano. No appointment is necessary and no insurance is required.

WHEN: Saturday, April 21, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. The screenings will take approximately 30 minutes.

WHERE: 1701 Divisadero Street, third floor, San Francisco.

WHY: Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer, with more than three million skin cancers diagnosed annually in some two million people in the United States. More new cases of skin cancer are diagnosed each year than the combined totals of breast, prostate, lung and colon cancers. Melanoma is the most common form of cancer for young adults 25 to 29 years old. Anyone can develop skin cancer, regardless of skin color or general health. Many can be easily treated when detected early.

About UCSF Medical Center

UCSF Medical Center consistently ranks as one of the top 10 hospitals in the United States. Recognized for innovative treatments, advanced technology, collaboration among health care professionals and scientists, and a highly compassionate patient care team, UCSF Medical Center serves as the academic medical center of the University of California, San Francisco. The medical center’s nationally preeminent programs include children’s health, the brain and nervous system, organ transplantation, women’s health and cancer. It operates as a self-supporting enterprise within UCSF and generates its own revenues to cover the operating costs of providing patient care.

Follow UCSF Medical Center on www.facebook.com/UCSFMedicalCenter or on Twitter @UCSFHospitals.

Lockheed Martin Sun Scientist Dr. Alan M. Title Honored With 2011 American Geophysical Union Medal in San Francisco

Friday, December 9th, 2011

The big 2011 AGU convention is winding down in San Francisco with news of a bay area physicist winning the big award.

Congratulations Dr. Alan M. Title!

Click to expand

All the deets:

“Lockheed Martin Physicist Honored With 2011 American Geophysical Union John Adam Fleming Medal

PALO ALTO, Calif., Dec. 8, 2011  – Dr. Alan M. Title, physicist at the Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT) Space Systems Advanced Technology Center (ATC) in Palo Alto, was honored last evening with the 2011 John Adam Fleming Medal, at a ceremony at the 2011 Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) in San Francisco. The Fleming Medal is awarded not more than once annually to an individual “for original research and technical leadership in geomagnetism, atmospheric electricity, aeronomy, space physics, and related sciences.”

Established in 1960, the Fleming Medal is named in honor of John Adam Fleming, who made important contributions to the establishment of magnetic standards and measurements. Fleming served as AGU officer in a number of positions, including: secretary of the Terrestrial Magnetism and Atmospheric Electricity section (1920-1929), Union General Secretary (1925-1947), and honorary president (1947-1956). John Adam Fleming was associated with the science of geomagnetism throughout his career, and with the American Geophysical Union from its founding until his death.

As a scientist, Alan Title studies the Sun.  His primary research interest is the generation, distribution, and effects of the solar magnetic field throughout the Sun’s interior and outer atmosphere. Using spectral imaging techniques we now can map both horizontal and vertical flows in the solar interior and surface. Flow maps have shown among other things how the solar interior rotates as a function of radius. This profile is essential for any understanding of interior magnetic field generation – dynamo action. Magnetic fields can be measured in the photosphere and inferred in the interior and outer atmosphere. Using these techniques it has been discovered that magnetic field emerges everywhere on the solar surface at a rate sufficient to completely replace the fields outside of active regions in less than a day, and even active region fields are replace in at most a few weeks. The detailed mechanisms by which magnetic energy is released is currently the focus of his research. At present, he has 169 articles in refereed journals. Building on accumulated knowledge, through observation and experimentation, he asks new questions of the Sun and formulates hypotheses on how it might work.

As an engineer, Alan Title designs, develops, builds, and flies new instruments that will gather the data necessary to test those hypotheses. He led the development of tunable bandpass filters for space-based solar observations, a version of which is currently operating on the JAXA/ISAS Hinode spacecraft.  He also invented a tunable variation of the Michelson Interferometer that has been employed on the SOHO spacecraft, the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), the Global Oscillations Network Group of the National Solar Observatory as well as other ground-based systems.

Extraordinarily dedicated to advancing public awareness of science, Dr. Title has supported activities at the Tech Museum, Chabot Observatory, Boston Museum of Science, the National Air and Space Museum, and the Hayden Planetarium. In addition, his educational outreach funding has supported a yearly summer program for Stanford undergraduates, and the Stanford Hass Center activities that develop science programs for K-12 classrooms. And for two decades, promising students from the Palo Alto High School District have come to work in his laboratory.

Ever more deets, after the jump

(more…)

New SFPUC Building at 525 Golden Gate Has Lots and Lots and Lots of Louvers

Thursday, September 29th, 2011

That’s what I’m calling them, louvers.

This is the south-facing wall of our new EcoPalace:

Click to expand

This building is a bit different, anyway.