Posts Tagged ‘systems’

Aviation Writer James Fallows Commits the MSM Blunder of the Year with “Don’t Blame Malaysia Airlines” in the NYT

Tuesday, July 22nd, 2014

Hoo boy: “Don’t Blame Malaysia Airlines

“Was this disaster somehow the airline’s fault? The answer is no — but to understand why, you have to look at the complex realities of modern commercial aviation.”

My isn’t this a touch patronizing? Well, obviously the primary fault is with the crew and commanders of the Gadfly missile system used to shoot down the plane. But Malaysian Air Systems is partially to blame for its negligent operation.

“Malaysia Airlines, already world famous because of the still-missing flight MH370, appears to have been following all normal safety rules.”

Is anybody suggesting that this flight was somehow illegal? I don’t think so. So talking about Malaysian following the “rules” is pointless.

“…explicit prohibitions are critical, because the entire aviation system works on the premise that unless airspace is marked as off-limits, it is presumptively safe and legal for flight.

OK again, Jimmy, the flight was unsafe but legal. Nobody’s suggesting that the flight was not legal.

“…when they crossed this zone at 33,000 feet, they were neither cutting it razor-close nor bending the rules, but doing what many other airlines had done, in a way they assumed was both legal and safe.”

Again, Jimmy, why are you harping on what’s “legal” to make your point that Malaysian wasn’t negligent? It’s as if the New York Times has turned into the Public Relations arm of Malaysian Air Systems or the government of Malaysia.

All right, it’s time to review. Here’s a partial list of airlines that were specifically avoiding this part of eastern Ukraine before the shootdown:

Asiana Airlines

Korean Air Lines  

China Airlines

Air France

British Airways

Air Berlin [Germany's second-largest airline]

The operators of these airlines would have been able to fly over eastern Ukraine legally, but they chose not to. Why’s that, Jimmy? Why would these airlines spend more on kerosene for no reason?

Mr. Fallows continues in The Atlantic:

Somehow I suspect that if it had been a Lufthansa plane that was attacked, there would be fewer starting-point assumptions that the carrier had somehow been cutting corners at the cost of its passengers’ safety. 

This sounds like it came straight from Malaysian Airlines, this racism (or whatever) argument he’s pushing. In any event, corner-cutting at the expense of passenger safety is exactly what occurred here.

And here’s the stinger:

“If a government or rogue faction shoots down a commercial plane, is that really an “air safety issue?” 

Well, hell yes it is, Jimmy. It’s exactly an air safety issue. That’s why all those airlines cited above, plus others, were avoiding the area. For safety.

Comes now aviation writer Christine Negroni to offer views contrary to that of flyboy fanboy James Fallows:

So while Malaysia is self-evidently correct it its statements; the airspace was open and hundreds flights between Europe and Asia were using it every day, it is a weak reply to a valid question of responsibility

Indeed.

Why James Fallows wants to shut down the conversation about the question of responsibility is a mystery to me…

What Mayor Ed Lee Is Doing Tomorrow: The “HSBC Made for Trade” Tour – Hey, Is Trade Good or Should We “Buy Local?”

Tuesday, June 17th, 2014

The “HSBC Made for Trade Tour” is blowing through town tomorrow – sked below.

Observations:

- So “trade” is good? I thought we were supposed to “buy local?” I don’t have a beef against international trade myself, but I’m a little surprised to see SFGov participating in this trade love-fest.

- Isn’t the Bay Area Council Economic Institute now discredited owing to the recent America’s Cup fiasco? I think so. And yet here there are popping up as if nothing at all is wrong. Here you go, this BACEI report was a laugh riot: The America’s Cup: Economic Impacts of a Match on San Francisco Bay. Check it, potential “economic benefits” of “$9.9 billion,” whatever that meant. And a “fleet of super yachts” was supposed to motor through the Panama Canal and then shower riches upon us in some sort of Build It And They Will Come aquatic cargo cult. Hey! Perhaps the BACEI could gin up a report for how great the 2024 Olympics would be for us – wouldn’t that be a nice encore?

- And isn’t our Chinese Consulate the Locus of Espionage for Northern California? I think so. Or name me a better one, gentle reader? Anyway, here they come, as if nothing’s a matter.

Here you go, here’s the pitch:

HSBC Made for Trade is a national conversation with leaders in business, government, industry and academia about the role of global trade in today’s economy. This national tour looks at the contribution of the international flow of goods, services and capital to the U.S. economy, and the opportunities for American businesses brought about by global trade.”

And here’s tomorrow’s agenda:

Program Agenda

Financing The Future
The Palace Hotel
San Francisco, CA
Wednesday, June 18, 2014

11:00 a.m.
Welcome 
Steve Bottomley
Head of Commercial Banking, North America, HSBC

11:05 a.m.
Innovative Policy Approaches To Support Globalization
Deputy Assistant Secretary Ted Dean
Deputy Assistant Secretary for Services, U.S. Department of Commerce, International Trade Administration

11:15 a.m.
Trade In The Bay Area: Investment And Global Financial Flows
Introduction by Steve Bottomley
Head of Commercial Banking, North America, HSBC
Moderated by Andrew S. Ross
Business Columnist, San Francisco Chronicle
Dr. Sean Randolph
President & CEO, Bay Area Council Economic Institute
Additional commentary from:
Deputy Assistant Secretary Ted Dean
Deputy Assistant Secretary for Services, U.S. Department of Commerce, International Trade Administration
Debra J. Lodge
Head of RMB FX Business Development, North America, HSBC Global Markets
Xia Xiang
Economic and Commercial Counselor, Consulate General of the People’s Republic of China, San Francisco

12:00 p.m.
Keynote Remarks
Introduction by Steve Bottomley
Head of Commercial Banking, North America, HSBC
The Honorable Edwin M. Lee
Mayor, City of San Francisco

12:20 p.m.
Lunch Served
Marlon Young
Chief Executive Officer, Americas, HSBC Private Bank

12:40 p.m.
Panel Discussion: How Bay Area Businesses Are Fueling The 
Future Of America
Introduction by Marlon Young
Chief Executive Officer, Americas, HSBC Private Bank
Moderated by Jim Wunderman
President and CEO, Bay Area Council
Benedict J. Bowler
Treasurer, Matson, Inc.
Lisa Peschcke-Koedt
Vice President, Global Tax and Customs, Cisco Systems, Inc.
Johan Nystedt
Vice President and Global Treasurer, Levi Strauss & Co.
Dan Shapero
Vice President, Talent Solutions, LinkedIn

1:25 p.m.
California And The Business Of Trade
Introduction by Marlon Young
Chief Executive Officer, Americas, HSBC Private Bank
Kish Rajan
Director, California Governor’s Office of Business and Economic Development

1:35 p.m.
Closing Remarks 

RAND Corporation Study: Older Americans are Less Healthy than Older English People, But Americans Live Longer

Thursday, November 4th, 2010

Here’s some news from our RAND Corporation:

“Older Americans are less healthy than their English counterparts, but they live as long or even longer than their English peers, according to a new study by researchers from the RAND Corporation and the Institute for Fiscal Studies in London.

Researchers found that while Americans aged 55 to 64 have higher rates of chronic diseases than their peers in England, they died at about the same rate. And Americans age 65 and older — while still sicker than their English peers — had a lower death rate than similar people in England, according to findings published in the journal Demography.

The paper was co-authored by James Banks and Alastair Muriel of the Institute for Fiscal Studies and James P. Smith, distinguished chair in labor markets and demographic studies at RAND.

If you get sick at older ages, you will die sooner in England than in the United States,” Smith said. “It appears that at least in terms of survival at older ages with chronic disease, the medical system in the United States may be better than the system in England.”

Mmmm…

iconRead Article at muse.jhu.edu
iconPopulation and Aging Research Area

See the Sea Princess in Drydock at Pier 70 Tonight on the National Geographic Channel

Thursday, June 3rd, 2010

Remember back in the day, when San Francisco was a blue collar town? Well, dude, S.F. is still a blue collar town, if only because of BAE Systems and all the stuff they do with ships on the east si-iiiide.

Remember the 70-yard band-aid that was slapped on the Cosco Busan at Pier 70 a few years back? This will show the same kind of deal – tonight you’ll be able to see all the deets of the work of our highly-paid blue-collar types. You’ll be able to see the Sea Princess, inside and out.

Click to expand

Enjoy:

Sea Princess Stars in National Geographic Channel’s Hit Series ‘World’s Toughest Fixes’

June 3 Episode to Take Viewers Behind the Scenes During Princess Cruises Ship’s Drydock

SANTA CLARITA, Calif., June 1  — The immense job of drydocking Sea Princess will be featured in the June 3 episode of National Geographic Channel’s (NGC) top-rated show, World’s Toughest Fixes.  TV viewers can go behind the scenes as host Sean Riley follows the entire process from the time the Princess Cruises ship enters the drydock to the final sea trials.

Airing on Thursday, June 3 at 9 p.m. ET/PT on NGC, the show was filmed while Sea Princess was in a regularly scheduled drydock at BAE Systems San Francisco Ship Repair last September.  The episode focuses on the enormous task of completing a multitude of drydock projects in just 15 days, with emphasis on several technical “fixes” on the bottom of the ship that could only be accessed when the ship is out of the water.

“This is a unique opportunity for audiences to really appreciate the amazing around-the-clock effort needed to keep our ships in top shape to deliver the experience our passengers expect,” said Jan Swartz, Princess Cruises executive vice president.  “We’re excited that the National Geographic Channel was interested in featuring this rare behind-the-scenes project.”

One of the network’s most popular shows, World’s Toughest Fixes takes viewers inside some of the most daunting repair jobs with Riley, a professional master rigger, as he works with many of the world’s top mechanics to show how they tackle these challenging fixes. World’s Toughest Fixes airs Thursdays at 9 p.m. ET/PT on NGC.

Riley joins the Sea Princess drydock crew on a number of tasks, adding his own elbow grease and expertise along the way and tries out several drydock jobs.  He helps strip and power wash the hull, tries his hand at upholstery work and joins the team working high up on the ship to seal the windows.  He even gives viewers an up-close view inside the tail shaft housing as he crawls in to show the audience the work being done.

Throughout the episode viewers will get a glimpse of the buzz of activity on a ship in drydock, including a look at installation of carpet and floors, the stripping of wooden decks, and even a glimpse of the ship’s new adults-only Sanctuary which was constructed during the drydock.

More photos of last fall’s Sea Princess drydock are available in the Sea Princess Drydock Journal.  Behind-the-scenes photos of the World’s Toughest Fixes crew at work during the shoot are available on the Princess Flickr photostream.

Additional information about Princess Cruises is available through a professional travel agent, by calling 1-800-PRINCESS, or by visiting the company’s website at www.princess.com.

 Princess can also be found on:
 Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/PrincessCruises
 Twitter: http://twitter.com/PrincessCruises
 Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/princesscruises

Come to SF,CA if Your Huge Ship Needs Repair – Fixing Up the Sea Princess

Monday, September 21st, 2009

Check out this humongous cruise ship in drydock on the right side of San Francisco at Pier 70. (You know, right near the place where Mayor Gavin Newsom rented out San Francisco’s sovereignty and got snookered by the Chinese government simultaneously during the 2008 Olympic torch run fiasco.) This ship is big - like Cosco Busan big. But why did the people at Princess Cruise Lines choose San Francisco as a place to do a refit? Why not, baby? We rock! (It’s nice to know that San Francisco is still competitive in a few industries anyway.)

It’s the Sun-class Sea Princess, soon to be equipped with an adults-only [no, not that kind of adults-only] Sanctuary, an “oasis of tranquility” where you can escape from those pesky little anklebiters. 

Love, exiting and new - come aboard, we’re expecting you! Click to expand:

IMG_6765 copy

Can you see the big black screen? It’s for movies under the stars, just like we have in Dolores Park.

And here are the twin screws:

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And here’s a thruster hole (or whatever they call it) – all the better for maneuvering around at ports of call.

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BAE Systems will have this princess back on her feet and heading down south, Panama way, in no time.

Check out all the deets here.

And of course, the PCL people are Twittering all about it.

And look at all the recent drydock photos here on Flickr.

And the Facebook, always with the FB.

And look who christened the Sea Princess, back in the day – Zara Phillips, a real princess, or princess-to-be, or something. Her grandmother is the Queen of England anyway.

Bon Voyage, Sea Princess!