Posts Tagged ‘tagged’

Rec and Park’s New “Wayfinding” Signs in the Panhandle Have Amazing Anti-Graffiti Capability

Thursday, August 3rd, 2017

I don’t know if the capability is new, but the signs are new.

So here was when they first got tagged and here is after cleaning:

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It seems like they’re coated with Teflon, like a nonstick surface you’d cook eggs on.

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Touché, RPD. Touche.

Brand-New “Wayfinding” Signs in the Panhandle Tagged Already: Anti Bike Graffiti – Plus, NoPA is OUT and DivCo is IN

Wednesday, August 2nd, 2017

So let’s see, first the good news. RPD moved the placement of their signs just like I asked them to. Amazing. One of the old signs, which actually were pretty new, totally blocked the view of peds trying to get across the Golden Gate Park Panhandle bicycle freeway, otherwise known as the Panhandle Path. So you’d be looking to the west, where riders are coming downhill, and then RPD’s sign would be in the way. So that’s great.

Now, the new signs still have the SEVEN NO’s listing RPD’s rules, but they also have “wayfinding” up top. (Which is prolly why they moved the signs – the addition of the arrows telling tourists which way to go. You know, our RPD isn’t really all that big on safety, despite what it might tell you.) See?

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The sign is pointing you right to NOPA, but it’s all “Divisidero Corridor?” I thought that was already a failed place name? Mmmm. Haight-Ashbury is fine of course, but what’s this, “North Panhandle” points straight north of the Panhandle. This is another dis on NoPA, non? I’ll tell you, some neighborhood NIMBY/homeowner’s group calls the North Panhandle WEST NOPA, which translates as the area west of the area that’s north of the area that’s east of the Golden Gate Park Panhandle. I’m srsly. Here’s your reverse angle, looking west:

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So RPD left some room for taggers, as you can see in the first photo, and of course in the above photo, some pedestrian lined out the bike rider symbol with the international sign for GTFO.

(I know a lady who lives on Shrader who got hit by a bike rider going about 20 MPH, which is easy to do when you’re heading east since it’s downhill.* It doesn’t take much effort to get her to bring up the subject, as this accident is still on her mind. IDK, RPD refuses to widen this multi use path next to Fell. And RPD refuses to post a speed limit. Anyway, there’s a strong contingent of peds in the area who Don’t Like Bikes.)

So that’s it, enjoy your new signs, Frisco.

*You know, you don’t even need to pedal to go from Stanyan to the DMV on Baker eight blocks away, right? I can start from 0 MPH and make it to the DMV going at 16.3 MPH with big, wide, knobby tires, so that means that roadies with tiny tires, some of them pumping away with their heads down or even with their butts out of the saddle, well, maybe some of them are going too fast.

New-School “Bike-Share” Style Electric Rental Bikes Already Tagged, Even During the Testing Phase

Tuesday, July 25th, 2017

This photo pays off the headline, so no further elucidation is needed, I don’t think. As seen ‘neath a giant street art rat on Haight:

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Seems Ford Motor Company thinks it bought quite a bit for its $49 million dollars, including buying a kind of monopoly on bike-share bicycle rental? You tell me. It’s certainly not saying Let A Thousand Flowers Bloom, let’s bring more bikes to Frisco, oh no. That’s Ford Go-Bike for you.

Maybe Ford is worse than the taggers of the 94117, IDK.

Mommy, what’s FordPass?

These technologies cannot be deactivated in FordPass and do not respond to “Do-Not-Track” requests.

If you object to any changes to FordPass or to these Terms, your sole recourse is to stop using FordPass.

Further deets on this Brave New World of GoBike, in the Year Of Our Ford 1:

“Information We Collect. We collect the following types of information through your use of FordPass or third-party services that integrate with FordPass, such as Ford GoBike, which we also may combine with other information you have previously provided, or that we have collected from other sources:

  • Information you provide to create an account or sign-in to an existing account, such as name, email address, street address, telephone number, credit card, and Vehicle Identification Number (VIN). You must have an account to use FordPass.
  • Information we collect through FordPass includes:
    • Location information collected from your mobile device and/or vehicle, such as Global Positioning System (GPS) and location derived from IP address, which can be used to determine your device or vehicle’s current location, travel direction, and speed.
    • Mobile Device Information, such as software or operating system version, unique device identifiers, IP address, mobile network information, and mobile phone number.
    • Vehicle Information, such as the VIN, hardware model and part numbers, status of vehicle systems (e.g., fluid levels, tire pressure, and locks), vehicle diagnostics, odometer, and other information about how the vehicle is performing.
    • Driving Characteristics, such as speed, use of accelerator, brakes, steering, seat belts, and other similar information about how the vehicle is used.
  • Information about how you use FordPass or third-party services that integrate with FordPass, such as when and for how long you use features and when you contact us, a record of your communication.
  • FordPass may also contain online tracking technologies (e.g. Adobe Analytics and Aptelligent) on your mobile device that collect non-personal information about how FordPass is used and how it is performing including if it crashes, and which may be able to be connected across devices and over time. These technologies cannot be deactivated in FordPass and do not respond to “Do-Not-Track” requests.

How We Use Information We Collect: We use your personal information – information that reasonably identifies you – to provide you with great functionality and services, allow you to control certain vehicle features, fulfill requests you’ve made in FordPass, personalize your experience, troubleshoot problems, develop new and improved products, services, and marketing strategies and research, to protect safety, property, privacy, and security, or to comply with legal requirements. WE MAY send communications about products, services, offers, promotions, news, and more that are customized based on your personal information, including your location, speed, and driving characteristics. You may choose not to provide certain personal information (such as not entering a VIN to connect to your vehicle or not entering a credit card to use My Wallet services), but this may limit or prevent use of certain features. We may use and share non-personal information for any purpose.

No Canvas is Too Small, When You are a True Graffiti Artist – Consider This Bike Lock on Divisadero

Thursday, June 1st, 2017

Consider yourself tagged, little bike lock.

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As Seen In The Richmond: A BMW’s Last Ride

Monday, October 17th, 2016

I guess it’s a parts car now:

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More car glass gets broken in Frisco than prolly anywhere else in the world…

Physical Graffiti: The Reason Why You Shouldn’t Park Your Excavators on the Streets of San Francisco

Thursday, October 6th, 2016

As seen on Masonic:

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Welcome to Frisco:

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Here’s What Happens When You Advertise on an SFMTA / MUNI Bus Stop Ad – Poor SHINOLA Detroit!

Monday, May 23rd, 2016

This kind of thing, as seen recently on the windswept Geary Transit Corridor…

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…has precedents:

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You know what I think? I think that sometimes companies pay money to Clear Channel Outdoor so that it will send part of that money to out sad-sack SFMTA and then maybe SFGov / the SFMTA will then look kindlier upon said generous companies. So it’s kind of more like a bribe / kickback / apology than a pure, earnest attempt at advertising.

I could cite examples…

All Panel Vans Left Out Overnight on the Streets of San Francisco Get Tagged, Except for This One – 1AMSF.Com?

Thursday, May 7th, 2015

Not sure what local homeowners associations, such as the NOPNA in NoPA, would think of this area bidness:

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Cold Busted: Do SFMTA Parking Control Officers Even Try to Follow the Law? Take a Look

Thursday, January 9th, 2014

Leave us review California Vehicle Code Section 40202(a):

“The notice of parking violation shall also set forth … the last four digits of the vehicle identification number, if that number is readable through the windshield...”

Except some DPT meter maids are in the habit of not writing down the last four digits of the VIN. Check it:

Some SFMTA parking citation officers thought they found a loophole by simply entering “cannot read,” “covered,” or “unable to locate” in the VIN field space of a citation. 

03/07/12: Officer NW (Badge #206) wrote 66 citations of which he said he “cannot read” the VIN plate information on all 66 of them!  

02/01/12: Officer TA (Badge #12) wrote 27 citations of which he said he “cannot read” the VIN plate information on all 27 of them.”

So am I saying I believe the factual statements of some random Change.org petition over anything spun out by the SFMTA?

Yes, yes I am.

Now is this VIN requirement kind of a technicality, and is it kind of a pain to be looking for VINs when the PCOs need to make their quotas in order to pay for Ed Reiskin’s generous benefits package? Yes and yes.

But that’s the law. Perhaps the SFMTA should try to change the law if it’s so hard to obey.

Let’s hope that the SFMTA keeps a closer eye on its PCOs in the future…

Now let’s travel back to the past:

Via the excellent Uptown Almanac comes news of this anti-MUNI bumper sticker campaign:

Beej Weir with deets here and here.

“The bottom of the sticker reads: “ASSAULTING A PARKING CONTROL OFFICER IS A CRIME. SO DON’T GET CAUGHT.”- WACKO 1

As previously noted, harsh.

California Penal Code 241 — Assault, punishment. (“(b) When an assault is committed against the person of a parking control officer engaged in the performance of his or her duties, and the person committing the offense knows or reasonably should know that the victim is a parking control officer, the assault is punishable by a fine not exceeding two thousand dollars ($2,000), or by imprisonment in the county jail not exceeding six months, or by both the fine and imprisonment.”

So much for “Good People, Tough Jobs.”

Tagging a Postal Van? Man, That’s Cold – Here’s What Mayor Ed Lee’s San Francisco Looks Like These Days

Monday, October 1st, 2012

Oh well:

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How much will it cost to mail a first-class letter in five years? I’m thinking a dollar…