Posts Tagged ‘telephone’

Not Many Takers for Frisco Phone Book Delivery the Past Month – Is “YP” Just a Scam to Separate Advertisers from Their Money?

Friday, December 22nd, 2017

This is my current theory. If the cost of production and delivery is less than what you can get out of advertisers, then you have an operating business, it seems, even if every last one of these unwanted “books” gets recycled within a few days of them getting dumped off.

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Just a theory.

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Frisco’s Opt Out System for Useless Telephone Book Delivery Isn’t Working, and Here’s the Proof

Thursday, November 23rd, 2017

Here’s the official opt out webpage, but it don’t work.

What happens is that deliverers count the number of units in a building and then leave that exact number on your stoop regardless of anybody opting out. Really, this is a lot easier than consulting some Do Not Deliver list.

So, a 3-unit building:

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And a 14-unit building:

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And another 3-unit building:

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See how that works?

So:

  1. Frisco’s vaunted opt out system doesn’t work.
  2. Nobody wants these useless, bulky ad books anyway, so that makes things obvious that Frisco’s vaunted opt out system doesn’t work.
  3. Phone books haven’t been relevant since they took out the Rainbow Grocery 20% off coupons.

Attention YP: Nobody in town wants your products.

END OF LINE.

SNICH!

Tuesday, June 20th, 2017

Frisco’s last operational phone booth, almost, in case you want to drop a dime – as seen south of Market:

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Ah, Phone Book Recycling Season Hits Frisco Early This Year – But Don’t Be Fooled, Know That YP = Yellow Pages

Thursday, November 19th, 2015

I’ll tell you, I didn’t recycle all these books by my lonesome, but I thought about it:

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The Best Cell Phone Tower in the World – We Should Have These Things Installed at Every Intersection, Whatever the Engineers Wish

Friday, December 26th, 2014

And then SF would have a chance at actually being the “Innovation Capitol of the World”

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Invisible airwaves crackle with Life
Bright antennae bristle with the energy
Emotional feedback on timeless wavelength
Bearing a gift beyond price, almost free

The Beautiful Overhead Wires of the Inner Sunset – Wires are Energy, Communication, Transportation – Wires Are Life

Monday, November 10th, 2014

What do you see here? It’s a Rorschach test deal:

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There are some millionaires out there who think that we should take tax money, mostly from non-millionaires of course, and use it to get rid of all these cables and wires and whatnot and replace them with a more expensive approach.

I cry foul.

(415) (628) (650): San Francisco Will Soon Have _Three_ Different Area Codes – Plus, 10-Digit Dialing is Already Here for Some Of Us

Thursday, July 31st, 2014

[UPDATE: I almost forgot – there’s going to be a 628 test number to call:

“A test number has been established to enable business customers to verify that their equipment can complete calls to the new area code.  The test number, (628) 628-1628, will be available beginning Dec. 21 and will be in operation through April 21, 2015.”]

Gentle Reader, do you remember when the East Bay used the 415 area code? Well, I do. The switchover to the nickel-and-dime occurred back in 1991. And in a small way, it divided the East Bay from the West Bay, just how Elaine Benes felt isolated from 212 Manhattan by the 646 area code overlay back in the day.

Well, get ready for some more changes, ’cause the new 628 overlay means that you’ll be dialing the 415 area code even from the 415 – this is called ten-digit dialing.

Anyway, here’s the news – ten-digit dialing has arrived already. By that, I mean that I can no longer dial my 415 land line with my T-Mobile 415 cell phone without first punching in the area code. This change occurred a few weeks back. Welcome to The Future. [But apparently, seven digit dialing is still working for some or most of the rest of San Francisco – see the Comments section. They’ll be phasing things in, optionally at first, and then mandatorily.]

Of course we could have handled things differently, but the small-minded people of our Small Business Commission wanted to do things this way, because, you know, business!

Let’s see, what else? Oh, yeah, for some reason, some people in SF have 650 area codes, like down in Ingleside Heights:

So, SF will soon have three area codes for just 46-something square miles. What a country!*

Anyway, enjoy:

In closing:

“No, it’s just like 212 except they multiplied every number by 3… and added 1 to the middle number.”

*In Soviet Russia, phone dial you!

Oh No, the “628” Area Code Coming to SF in Just Nine Short Months and the CA CPUC Wants Us to Start Preparing Now!

Monday, June 16th, 2014

OMG, the gov’mint is messing with our good old 415 area code, starting in just two months. The era of ten- or eleven-digit dialing is upon us.

The horror, the horror:

“CPUC Offers Reminder Of New Dialing Procedure For Consumers With 415 Area Code

SAN FRANCISCO, June 16, 2014 –The California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) today reminded residential and business customers served by the 415 area code that they need to prepare for the introduction of the new 628 area code overlay. The 628 area code will be added, or overlaid, to the 415 regions to ensure businesses and consumers have access to telephone numbers from their wireline and wireless carrier of choice.

With the 415/628 area code overlay, customers must dial “1” plus the three-digit area code for all calls to and from telephone numbers with the 415 and 628 area codes. Customers may begin to use this new dialing procedure on August 16, 2014, when consumers and businesses with a 415 area code telephone number may begin dialing 1 + area code + seven digit telephone number when making all local calls. The new dialing procedure will become mandatory for all residential and business consumers on February 21, 2015. On March 21, 2015, the new 628 area code may be assigned to those who request a new telephone number or an additional telephone line, as well as any available numbers in the 415 area code.

Residents and businesses with telephone numbers within the 415 area code will retain their current telephone number(s) and area code. Consumers requesting new or additional telephone numbers (or telecommunications services) may be assigned telephone numbers with either the new 628 area code or the original 415 area code, depending on available telephone number inventory. Consumers will still be able to dial three digits to reach 911, 211, 311, 411, 511, 611, 711, and 811.

To prepare for the area code overlay, residents and businesses in the 415 region should:

—  Begin dialing 1 + area code + telephone number for all calls. [NO, I REFUSE!]

—  Notify alarm service providers. [ALL RIGHT, GOOD IDEA, CPUC]

—  Reprogram equipment or features including automatic dialers, speed-dialing, call forwarding, modems for computer or Internet dial-up access, etc. [NO, I REFUSE!]

—  Advise family, friends, and business contacts to dial 1 + area code + telephone number for all calls. [AS IF, CPUC. NO, I REFUSE!]

—  Ensure that security door and gate systems are reprogrammed to dial 1 + area code + telephone number.  [ALL RIGHT, GOOD IDEA, CPUC]

—  Test telephone equipment to determine if it can dial and receive 1 + area code + telephone number. Questions regarding changes in telephone equipment should be directed to telephone equipment vendors. [NO, I REFUSE!]

—  Update items such as stationary, checks, business cards, advertisements, promotional items, brochures, Internet web pages, and catalogs to reflect the 1 + area code + telephone number change. [NO, I REFUSE!]   

California and other states have successfully implemented approximately 60 area code overlays throughout the U.S. to meet the continual growing demand for more telephone numbers.

For more information, consumers and businesses should contact their telephone service provider or visit:www.cpuc.ca.gov/areacode415.

For more information on the CPUC, please visit www.cpuc.ca.gov.

SOURCE  California Public Utilities Commission

California Public Utilities Commission”

You See Fewer Obsolete Phone Books Littering San Francisco These Days – Perhaps the Message is Getting Through?

Tuesday, December 31st, 2013

Let’s hope so.

On Duboce:

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BARRY ZITO STUDIED GUITAR WITH ME

Thursday, July 4th, 2013

Could this Fi-Di come-on be legal under the laws of SFGov?

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IDK, maybe.