Posts Tagged ‘terrace’

R.I.P. Moss Room Restaurant – Now Here’s the Outdoorsy, More Casual “Terrace” at the California Academy of Sciences

Thursday, October 16th, 2014

[UPDATE: So I’ve been looking for any kind of support for The San Francisco Chronicle’s objections to Sodexo, but I’m not finding much. Throw in this rewrite from well-trafficked EaterSF of the Chronicle bit linked below and see that the obviously-well-trafficked Chron got a total of four comments on the matter.

And, oh look, The Terrace is now officially approved by District One Supervisor Eric Mar and District Four Supervisor Katy Tang.

And here’s what the place looks like on a foggier day.

And now we’ve also got these posts:

Academy of Sciences opens “The Terrace” cafe for garden dining from The Richmond District Blog

New academy restaurant maintains Bay Area culinary trend by David Boitano, Steinhart Aquarium[!] Examiner

And here’s the new menu of The Terrace

So that’s a wrap on the Academy’s new eatery.]

Or The Terrace, if you prefer, at our California Academy of Sciences

Believe it or not, this is a color photo:

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Oh, this is better:

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Comes now the San Francisco Chronicle’s Paolo Lucchesi to complain about the choice of vendor for this eatery (and BTW, it’s also the new vendor for  Academy Cafe, about which more anon). 

So I don’t know – basically what’s happening is we’re losing the subterranean fine dining Moss Room but gaining the more casual Terrace. I’ll tell you, I was invited to sample the food twice at the Moss Room, both for the first iteration a while back and then for one of the more recent efforts, and I declined because I’m not really competent to judge food, frankly. (But at the time I wondered how the place would do considering its location, which aint good for several reasons…)

Anyway, I don’t get the beef over the new vendor. I assume that everything will work out fine.

Speaking of which, here’s the new menu from the Academy Cafe, which just started up October 1st or so:

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Now back to the Terrace – here you go, some bites with goat cheese. It was yummy:

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And here’s a salad:

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And here’s what’s in the salad:

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And here’s the pizetta:

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And so on…

Do you see what I mean here? The Terrace isn’t a replacement for the Moss Room – it’s just what came next after the Moss Room didn’t work out. And the basement location of the Moss Room would appear to make a great semi-hidden event space…

(I can recall how upset some people were about getting a new vendor at the nearby Stow Lake Boathouse a few years back. The “local” vendor basically responded to the RPD beauty contest with a real half-assed attitude – he thought he deserved the contract no matter what. I didn’t agree with that either.)

Anyway, if the food writers of the Chronicle want to head out to the Park to see the set-up, I’m sure they’d be welcome to do so…

All the deets:

(more…)

Tale of Two Brand-New Traffic Signals – Creating Traffic Jams on Masonic Near the New Target Store

Tuesday, August 12th, 2014

Here’s your SFMTA at work.

Before, it wanted timed lights to encourage drivers to go 25 MPH:

Signal Timing Adjustments Analyzed  signal timing along Masonic and expect to be implemented  by the end of November

But now, this is what you see southbound from Anza / O’Farrell:

See that? As the light at Anza goes green, the light at Ewing Terrace goes red, so both northbound and southbound traffic backs up at Ewing Terrace whether anybody wants to cross Masonic on foot or enter or leave  Ewing Terrace in a car.

I don’t get the SFMTA,

San Francisco’s Only Real “Gated Community” is Presidio Terrace – The Gates are Always Open But There’s a Guard to Keep You Out

Friday, July 11th, 2014

Sometimes.

But dividing the cost of a security guard among 20-something families is prolly pretty expensive, so at other times there’s only an empty SUV posted as sentry.

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And best of all, the place is Caucasians-only, sort of:

In a small brochure, Object Lessons in Homebuilding, developers Baldwin and Howell promoted racial covenants as part of a set of deed covenants attached to a model planned gated suburb, Presidio Terrace. Deed covenants were used to ensure protection from the nuisances of uncontrolled growth following the 1906 earthquake and to create a community of “Caucasians” only in Presidio Terrace. Among such progressive urban design amenities as underground utilities, asphalt roads for automobiles, and private picturesque streets, racial covenants guaranteed racial homogeneity as an integral part of desirable suburban housing. Baldwin and Howell marketed Presidio Terrace lots by focusing comparatively on the settlement of Japanese immigrants in the Western Addition district of San Francisco as undesirable and blighted by racial pathologies.”

A #21 Hayes High Atop the Hayes Street Cut – If You Can’t Afford a Tunnel – If You Think Hayes is Steep Now…

Thursday, February 27th, 2014

The sidewalk shows how steep Hayes was before The Cut:

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Happy Birthday to the “Hayes Street Cut” in Alamo Square – 100 Years Old – Less Climbing for the #21 Hayes Bus

Wednesday, February 12th, 2014

If you look at Hayes betwixt Pierce and Scott, you can see why the Hayes Street Cut exists.

And then you Google it to reveal:

“Hayes Street Cut: In order to re establish direct car service to the Hayes Street district north of the Panhandle* it is necessary to provide a lower grade between Pierce and Scott Streets And by a cut of 15 ft across the plateau at Pierce Street the maximum grade may be reduced from 14.6 to 10.9 (See Fig 72) which is within reasonable limits for electric equipment If a terraced arrangement is used with half the cut in the roadway and half in the walkway the cost for retaining walls will be considerably less than if the cut is extended full depth between property lines.”

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And here’s the San Francisco Call from 1910:

“All matters connected with the proposed Hayes street cut were put over until next week. The committee received the works board’s report that the improvement would cost the city $54,000.”

Now of course many parts of SF have been regraded over the years, but what makes the Hayes Street Cut the Hayes Street Cut is that the City accommodated the already partially-developed area. Nobody wanted to mess with private land south of Hayes. So people figured regrading the street while leaving the sidewalks mostly intact was the cheap solution. Terracing = less digging.

Here you go, the HAYES STREET PROFILE:

(I’ll note that the HSC makes the annual Bay to Breakers fun-run** easier on the competitors, as you can see.)

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, HAYES STREET CUT!

*We use the phrase NoPA these days, except that back then “north of the Panhandle” meant the area farther west, not that the real estate ladies of the 94117 would give a care about that.

**Hayes Street is NOT the highest part of the B2B course, despite what the MSM tells us every year. In fact, the highest part of the B2B is on JFK Drive at the foot of Rainbow Falls in Golden Gate Park. The More You Know…

Scenes from the SFPD Crime Scene at 125 Crown Terrace

Thursday, December 19th, 2013

Sarge to foreman with iPhone: “Get the contractor on the phone right now.”

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DBI inspector on Graystone Terrace:

Was this crime scene tape merited? Maybe we’ll find out someday

Maybe we won’t find out ever…

The Horrible Pedestrians of Masonic Avenue – See How They Run – A Darwin Award Loser

Monday, July 30th, 2012

Here’s how some people cross six lanes of Masonic at Ewing Terrace:

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Now, is this kind of thing legal? Well sure, if you’re walking – this could be one of those unmarked crosswalk deals.

But it’s not legal to cross here if you’re running. Sorry pedestrian.

(Our FUBARed beyond all reason SFMTA has a plan to put a traffic light in here whenever it can get its grand mal Masonic Street Design off the ground.)

Now a little further up the hill, we lost a ped who was similarly jaywalking earlier this year. I guess we could blame accidents like that the 30 MPH speed limit in front of Trader Joe’s, but that’s not how I’d look at it.

I’d look at it by trying to get inside the peds’ heads to try to think of a way to get them to not kill themselves.

Oh well.

Masonic Avenue Street Design Study

Engineering hearing on proposed changes, May 13, 2011

Masonic Street Redesign Study final report (PDF)

The survey results from the third community meeting, held on September 30, 2010, at San Francisco Day School (PDF), are available.

About the Project

The primary goal of the Masonic Avenue Street Design Study is to identify how Masonic Avenue between Geary Boulevard and Fell Street can safely and efficiently accommodate the needs of all roadway users, including but not limited to pedestrians, bicyclists, motorists and Muni. The project is funded by the San Francisco County Transportation Authority through the Prop K half-cent local transportation sales tax program.

Objectives:

1. Engage representatives of all constituencies within the community who would be impacted by changes to Masonic Avenue including, but not limited to, residents on Masonic Avenue, residents on side-streets, merchants, school representatives, bicyclists, Muni customers and pedestrians.

2. Improve transit operation.

3. Improve pedestrian and non-motorized access to transit.

4. Increase the safety of pedestrian crossings.

5. Increase motorist compliance with traffic rules and regulations.

6. Reduce the number of vehicular collisions, especially those involving pedestrians and bicyclists.

7. Support neighborhood vitality by creating a more inviting and accommodating public realm.

Community meeting presentations

The following presentations from the various community meetings are available from the San Francisco Planning Department website:

First community meeting presentation, June 15, 2010, Day School, PDF, 7MB
Second community meeting presentation, Aug. 10, 2010, Day School, PDF, 7MB
Third community meeting presentation, Sept. 30, 2010, Day School, PDF, 6MB

James Shahamiri
415.701.4732
james.shahamiri@sfmta.com

Letting Go in Miraloma Park: What Passes for a Backyard Bird in San Francisco (Hide Your Pets)

Wednesday, November 2nd, 2011

Just look at this monster, this Raptor from Miraloma Park:

1/6400th of a one second of Life via torbakhopper – click to expand

Craiglist Founder Craig Newmark lives on this same hill but further down, so he gets smaller backyard birds

OccupySF: Is Capitalist and Mayoral Candidate Joanna Rees Part of the 99% or the 1%?

Monday, October 17th, 2011

Here’s the news from Dan Schreiber:

Occupy SF gains support from Joanna Rees

And here’s how close the 99% will ever be able to get to her abode (assuming they don’ t want to risk getting tased with extreme prejudice).

Don’t tase me, bro: 

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[And once you make it past the security guards, you’ll still have to deal with the legacy of this street’s famous restrictive covenants.]

Actually, some of the 99% get paid what I assume to be something close to minimum wage to carry signs and otherwise sing the praises of Joanna Rees. And you know who pays for that? The taxpayers of the City and County of San Francisco, for some reason:

Somehow this all makes sense…

Joanna Rees Can’t Afford Her Mayoral Run But She CAN Afford a Security Guard To Keep People Off Her Street?

Thursday, September 1st, 2011

Apparently.

Ms. Rees’s problem is money. She has it. (She and her husband, her partner in a venture capital firm that is now being dismantled, live in Presidio Terrace, a gated enclave with uniformed guards.) But she has, as yet, refused to spend it. Though she stands to collect as much as $900,000 in public financing by agreeing to campaign-spending caps, Ms. Rees herself has not yet contributed a single dollar. And under the campaign-spending caps, none of her well-heeled contributors can give more than $500.”

You Shall Not Pass

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Ah yes, Presidio “restrictive covenants” Terrace.

Now, shouldn’t every “community” be gated?

Sure, why not?