Posts Tagged ‘thailand’

Beaver Surprise! This Tourist Airplane Over San Francisco Used To Be a Part of CIA-Owned Air America, Inc.

Monday, December 16th, 2013

[TRIGGER WARNING: Beaver*]

This 1955 de Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver, operated by Seaplane Adventures (aka San Francisco Seaplane Tours Inc) of Mill Valley, Marin County USA  and recently seen flying over Market Street…

…this one…

…used to operate out of Thailand as a part of the CIA-owned Air America, Inc a half-century ago.

See? It’s one of these:

“Six Beavers lined up* at Udorn, probably in 1962 (UTD/Fink/ photo no. 1-JF25-16-PB1)”

Get all the deets right here:

AIR AMERICA: DE HAVILLAND CANADA DHC-2 (L-20) BEAVER by Dr. Joe F. Leeker Last updated on 4 March 2013

To wit:

“DHC-2 (L-20) L-202 833 1 March 62 leased from US Army 54-1693

Service history: arrived at Bangkok in crates on 15 February 62, to be operated under the Madriver Contract AF62(531)-1674, based at Vientiane, but maintained at Udorn (Minutes ExCom-AACL of 23 January 62, in: UTD/CIA/B7F1); assembled by Thai Airways according to contract no. BKK 62-001 (Memorandum dated 9 February 62, in: UTD/Fink/B2F16); officially received at Bangkok on 1 March 62 (Aircraft list of June 62, corrected to Sept.1963, in: UTD/Kirkpatrick/B1F1).

Fate: was to be returned to the US Army in October 62 (Minutes ExCom-AACL of 30 October 62, in: UTD/CIA/B7F1); returned on 21 April 63 (Aircraft list of June 62, corrected to Sept.1963, in: UTD/Kirkpatrick/B1F1); sold to R. N. Nelson Earth Movers as N5220G in March 92; sold to Kenmore Air Harbor Inc, Kenmore, WA, in 92; sold to San Francisco Seaplane Tours, Mill Valley, CA, on 13 July 94; current in March 2004 (request submitted to the FAA on 13 March 2004 at http://162.58.35.241/acdatabase/); current in November 2008 (request submitted to the FAA on 23 Nov. 2008 at http://162.58.35.241/acdatabase/).”

So there you have it. Head on up to the Sausalito / Marin City / Mill Valley area and take a ride on a piece of flying history, if you want. $179 and up.

* Heh.

Something Else to Collect: New Generation of Momiji Message Dolls Debut in JapanTown

Monday, April 12th, 2010

To the extent that I have a beat, Japantown is in it (along with the Western Addition and Golden Gate Park and a few other places.) Consequently, people send me stuff sometimes and sometimes I draw your attention to it.

Alls I can say is that this Momiji stuff looks expensive. But it soon could be, as Chinpokomon was, Japans #1 cool toy to own.

Good-bye Kitteh, Hello Momiji!

Next stop, quasi-Japanese Mini-Momijis inside of McDonalds Happy meals? We Can Only Hope.

Anyway, these straight-outta-the-UK cuties will be available at the Kinokuniya Bookstore inside one of those 1960′s-style malls on Post Street in J-Town.

Momiji launch new doll collection at Kinokuniya
 
Since their inception almost five years ago, Momiji message dolls have gained a cult following worldwide amongst artists, designers and thousands more people worldwide. Momiji fans and collectors will be flocking to Kinokuniya bookstores across the USA this week for the exclusive launch of four brand new additions to the collection.
 
The four dolls, which form Generation 7 of the Momiji ‘Randoms Collection’, are Giggles, Soul, Happy Happy Happy and Pixie. Each one is packaged in Momiji’s signature noodle box and protected by tiny inflated pillows.
 
Momiji dolls proved to be an instant hit with Kinokuniya customers. Sharon Cunningham from the Flagship store in New York said,
 
“Momiji are adorable, our customers love collecting them so we were so excited to have the opportunity to launch these brand new designs to the world.”
 
As a center for the best in Japanese culture, literature and art, Kinokuniya was the perfect place to unveil Momiji’s new collection. Claire Rowlands, Creative Director for Momiji said,
 
“We love Kinokuniya, we could spend days exploring their amazing stores. Their commitment to celebrating great Asian art and design means we feel sure that the new dolls will be right at home there.”
 
Generation 7 can be found at the New York flagship store on Avenue of the Americas, the New York Palisade center store, as well as the San Francisco and Costa Mesa stores.
 
Momiji will be inviting owners of the new dolls to upload a photo of themselves with their purchase onto the official Momiji HQ Facebook page to be in with a chance of winning a Momiji prize bundle worth $200 as well as an exclusive Kinokuniya tote bag to carry it all in. Full details of the competition are available in store.
 
The dolls will be exclusive to America in four Kinokuniya stores before they are released to boutiques, galleries and museum stores around the States in July.
 
Momiji Generation 7 can be found exclusively at the following stores throughout April 2010
 
New York Main Store
1073 Avenue of the Americas (Bet 40th & 41st St)
New York, NY 10018
 
Palisade Center Store
3360 Palisades Center Drive
West Nyack, NY 10994
 
San Francisco Store
1581 Webster St (between Geary Blvd & Post St)
San Francisco, CA 94115 
 
 Costa Mesa Store
3030 Harbor Blvd #G-3
Costa Mesa, CA 92626
 
ABOUT MOMIJI
Momiji [‘mom-ee-jee’] are hand-painted collectible message dolls. The Momiji story began just over four years ago in the UK. Since then our brand has gained cult status around the globe. Momiji HQ is based in Henley in Arden, a little village famous for its ice cream. From here we have become truly global with designers creating lovely stuff all over the world: UK, Austria, Chile, Thailand, Germany, Canada and Slovenia. Our links with top art colleges mean that we work with the most creative new kids on the block.
 
Momiji, dedicated to making life lovelier.
 
www.lovemomiji.com
 
ABOUT KINOKUNIYA
Kinokuniya is the most well-known Japanese bookstore chain outside of Japan, with locations in the US, Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, Australia, Taiwan and Dubai. Its eight US locations, first opening in San Francisco’s famous Japantown in 1969, have become popular hot spots for those interested in both the traditional beauty of Japan and the new funky world of anime and manga. The flagship location in New York City relocated in 2007 to Midtown’s Bryant Park carries a huge selection of Japan and Asia related literature, art, architecture, CDs, DVDs, comics, magazines, apparel, toys and stationery. They have also partnered up with Japanese cafe, Cafe Zaiya, which serves delicious bento style meals and Japanese snacks that you can enjoy from the 2nd floor overlooking the park.

New Today at the Asian Art Museum – Emerald Cities: Arts of Siam & Burma

Friday, October 23rd, 2009

San Francisco’s highly-rated Asian Art Museum launched a new special exhibit today – it’s called Emerald Cities: Arts of Siam & Burma.

See?

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Read all about this great show from Candace JacksonNancy Ewart, Carol Canter, and Janos Gereben. (Civic Center Mike? Hello-oooo?)

So, let’s cue the monks and then check the Facebook:

“The opening ceremony went well! Peaceful, calming chanting and praying culminating in a monk blessing everyone by lobbing water droplets on the audience. Emerald Cities is now officially open, the orchid display goes down after Sunday, and on Sunday we have our Fall Family Festival — daylong festivities for all ages, and families don’t have to pay the Emerald Cities surcharge!”

And if you drop by the AAA in the next few days, you’ll get to see the orchids.

And win some free tickets here!

Check out this white elephant on Objet 136:

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That’s got to be the angriest-looking olliphant ever:

IMG_9414 copy

(‘ll post some more shots when they get back from the Photomat.)

A lot of work went into this exhibit so check it out, why don’t you?

See you there!

The Obsolete, 153-Pound CRT Televisions of the Streets of San Francisco

Friday, February 6th, 2009

Ho hum, just another abandoned TV on the sidewalks of the City and County. But this one weighs 153 pounds – who’s supposed to haul this thing away?

Click to expand:

And here’s another thing. This monster boob tube went from brand new to abandoned obsolensce in less than 3.5 years.

Next time, try ecoFinderrr, why not?