Posts Tagged ‘three’

(415) (628) (650): San Francisco Will Soon Have _Three_ Different Area Codes – Plus, 10-Digit Dialing is Already Here for Some Of Us

Thursday, July 31st, 2014

[UPDATE: I almost forgot - there's going to be a 628 test number to call:

"A test number has been established to enable business customers to verify that their equipment can complete calls to the new area code.  The test number, (628) 628-1628, will be available beginning Dec. 21 and will be in operation through April 21, 2015."]

Gentle Reader, do you remember when the East Bay used the 415 area code? Well, I do. The switchover to the nickel-and-dime occurred back in 1991. And in a small way, it divided the East Bay from the West Bay, just how Elaine Benes felt isolated from 212 Manhattan by the 646 area code overlay back in the day.

Well, get ready for some more changes, ’cause the new 628 overlay means that you’ll be dialing the 415 area code even from the 415 – this is called ten-digit dialing.

Anyway, here’s the news – ten-digit dialing has arrived already. By that, I mean that I can no longer dial my 415 land line with my T-Mobile 415 cell phone without first punching in the area code. This change occurred a few weeks back. Welcome to The Future. [But apparently, seven digit dialing is still working for some or most of the rest of San Francisco - see the Comments section. They'll be phasing things in, optionally at first, and then mandatorily.]

Of course we could have handled things differently, but the small-minded people of our Small Business Commission wanted to do things this way, because, you know, business!

Let’s see, what else? Oh, yeah, for some reason, some people in SF have 650 area codes, like down in Ingleside Heights:

So, SF will soon have three area codes for just 46-something square miles. What a country!*

Anyway, enjoy:

In closing:

“No, it’s just like 212 except they multiplied every number by 3… and added 1 to the middle number.”

*In Soviet Russia, phone dial you!

Seen on the Streets of San Francisco: A Scooter for Boys and a Scooter for Girls

Friday, July 25th, 2014

Scooter A: “VROOOOOM, VROOOM, LOOK AT ME! I’M DARTH VADER ON WHEELS – GET OUTTA THE WAY! I’M BAD TO THE BONE!!!”

Scooter B: “That’s nice. All right then – I’m going to TJ’s. Beep beep.”

Assignment Desk: What If SFGov Held a “Free 3-Month Culinary Job Training Program” and Nobody Showed Up?

Thursday, February 20th, 2014

You tell me, babe, is this official?

Sure looks official

How’s the attendance these days? I don’t know, actually.

What’s that, they’re promoting it through new channels, they’re still doing outreach for it even after it’s begun?

OK fine.

Brace Yourselves, Transit Riders: “$3 Acquisition Fee for New Adult Clipper Cards Takes Effect Sept. 1, 2012″

Tuesday, August 21st, 2012

Sounds fair enough.

I had a Clipper Card once:

Turns out that it couldn’t handle a simple two-day acetone bath, you know, the better to help see what’s inside.

Actually that was the predecessor to the Clipper, the Translink. Same basic thing though. Now here’s a real Clipper in a flashlight shot to show you where the heart is, that dark square at the bottom:

I think I got it for free.

I think I gave it away.

Anyway, all the deets:

“$3 Acquisition Fee for New Adult Clipper® Cards Takes Effect Sept. 1 - Fee Will Cover Costs, Encourage Long-Term Use

OAKLAND, Calif., Aug. 20, 2012 – Beginning September 1, 2012, new Adult Clipper cards will cost $3. As an incentive for customers to try automatically reloading their Clipper cards, Clipper will waive the $3 fee for customers who sign up for the Autoload feature when they order a card online at clippercard.com.

The new $3 fee is only for new Adult Clipper cards; Youth and Senior Clipper cards remain free, and the fee for a Regional Transit Connection Clipper card, for transit riders with qualifying disabilities, remains $3.

Clipper is the reloadable card that allows Bay Area transit riders to load cash value and monthly passes over the phone, online at clippercard.com and at a variety of retail locations, including most Bay Area Walgreens stores. Clipper is accepted on San Francisco Muni, BART, Golden Gate Transit and Ferry, Caltrain, SamTrans, AC Transit, Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA), Dumbarton Express, and San Francisco Bay Ferry (currently only on the South San Francisco/East Bay route).

Clipper cards have been free since the transit card program launched in June 2010. Clipper provided the cards free of charge over the past two years as an incentive for the hundreds of thousands of Bay Area transit riders to try the card. The incentive appears to have been successful, with more than 15 million trips taken using Clipper cards in July 2012. On an average weekday, transit riders take more than 600,000 trips using the card.

“We want to encourage people to keep their cards, reload them automatically and use them for a long time, rather than throwing them out and getting new ones,” said Carol Kuester, director of the Metropolitan Transportation Commission’s Electronic Payment section. “Charging a fee for the card also helps us be better stewards of public funds.”

Clipper offers convenience by keeping track of passes, discount tickets, ride books and cash value that customers load onto it, while automatically applying all applicable fares, discounts and transfer rules. Since Clipper cards can be registered for added security, customers whose cards are lost or stolen can have their card replaced and balance restored for a fee. Clipper customers with questions about their Clipper account can log in to their accounts at clippercard.com or call Clipper Customer Service at 877-878-8883 or TDD/TYY: 711 or 800-735-2929.

Clipper is a project of the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC), the transportation planning, financing and coordinating agency for the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area.  A question-and-answer page about the $3 Clipper card acquisition fee may be found on the MTC Web site at http://www.mtc.ca.gov/news/press_releases/rel575.htm.

SOURCE  Metropolitan Transportation Commission

Metropolitan Transportation Commission”

North Beach Update: Princess Leia’s Three-Wheeled Motor Scooter, Darth Vader’s Three-Wheeled Motor Scooter

Friday, June 1st, 2012

Here are your new, three-wheeled Piaggios, you know, dall’Italia.

The first one’s kind of cute but the other one is pure evil – just look at it:

Click to expand

Oh, and the prices? About double what I expected.

Anyway, which would you prefer?

Leave us close with the Piaggio Girls, direct from Italy:

Gilera_500ie_2007_14_1024x768 copy

Don’t forget your helmet. Safety first:

67GileraFUOCO500ie copy

Esaminilo, madre! Nessun mani!

piaggio_mp3__hybrid copy

The tragedy of helmet hair:

2007-gilera-fuoco-500ie-40_800x0w copy

Better Know Your California Special “Red Letter” License Plates – What Does “S3″ Mean? What Does “R” Mean?

Thursday, March 1st, 2012

I’ll tell you, if you drive around long enough with a red letter license plate, CHP officers will end up asking you what your license plate means.

The red “S” stands for Senate, as in California State. (Red is their color, it’s their thing. The lower house, the Assembly, prefers to use royal blue.)

The “3″ stands for 3rd District, like the one we have on the right side of San Francisco (and on up to Marin and parts of Sonoma County).

And the little “R,” well that means “retired.”

Note that the registration is current. Note that this retired state senator actually paid for his meter space. Hurray:

Click to expand

Now, you Better Know Your California Special “Red Letter” License Plates.

The East Side of Sixth Street From Market to Stevenson Alley in 2012: From Pearl’s Deluxe Burgers to Murder

Wednesday, January 18th, 2012

Well, let’s see how things look these days on one-third of one-half of the first block of troubled Sixth Street these days.

On the left you can find the current roost of Mobile Command Three from the SFPD. It’s probably there owing to the recent murder (San Francisco’s first and only for 2012 so far) at Stevenson and Sixth. If the cops wanted to have a substation in this area, they’d already have one in there, of course, so the 415′s littlest Mobile Command unit is a kind of temporary substitute.

And look, the poorly-managed and poorly-situated Passion Cafe is no more. The sign that used to be there is gone. Will tourist-beloved Dottie’s True Blue Cafe move in there soon? I don’t know.

And oh, the Happy Donuts has finally moved in from across the street and, of course, the SFGov-backed Pearl’s Deluxe Burgers is now firmly ensconced on the corner. It’s hard getting used to having a fast food burger chain in here:

Click to expand

So that’s what’s new in this active stretch of the corrupt Twitterloin.

Speaking of which, what’s up with this? Can you imagine going down to your local diner to get a malted or whatever and leaving your bike propped up against the building unlocked, thusly?

What is this, Mayberry, RFD or Osaka, Japan? I mean, I don’t think you can just leave your bike around on the sidewalk while you nosh on your twice-fried American fries, can you?

Well, I guess you can but it’s a good way to lose your ride with a quickness.

Or, maybe it’s a bait bike from the SFPD, put out there to see who would steal it? Anyway, it was there all by its lonesome for seven minutes at least, which has got to be some kind of record for Mid-Market. Hurray.

That’s your 2012 update for the heart of Mayor Ed Lee’s troubled Mid Market area…

There’s Way More Poo in Justin Herman Plaza Now Than During the Height of OccupySF – Why Is That?

Wednesday, December 28th, 2011

Horses, that’s why. Police horses, that is.

JHP poo, tourists, the Embarcadero, and Ferry Building. Welcome to San Francisco!

Click to expand

Perhaps the super-whiny whiners in the the area, such as Boston Properties* and whoever, will start writing sneaky letters to SFGov about how they’re going to sue, sue, sue over horse poo now?

Perhaps.

So, now that OccupySF is over, area property owners are happy? Really? Mmmm.

And who was it, was it Hawaiian Airlines or Disney what was demanding the end of OccupySF? Maybe I’ll look into that and see how they feel about Occupy. [Cough, boycott, cough.]

On It Goes…

*Owner of Embarcadero Center or someplace. (Now isn’t that a great name for a San Francisco company?) 

Via David Yu: Embarcadero Center 5,4,3,2,1, 345 California, 555 California, 505 Montgomery, TransAmerica Pyramid

Friday, November 25th, 2011

These are your skyline landmarks, as seen from Treasure Island:

Via David Yu – click to expand

This is what San Francisco looks like for the year-end holidays of 2011. Now here’s what things looked like in years past:

First, he was all like this:

Then he was all like this:

Then it’s all like this. The view from Chinatown of Embarcadero Center Buildings One, Two, Three, Four, and West (lower right – EW is the black sheep of the EC Family) along with the Emerald City look of 505 Montgomery.

Click to expand

A reverse angle from the San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge showing the TransAmerica Pyramid, in black-and-white, mostly:

A family portrait, as seen from Treasure Island. All your faves are in there, girlfriend. Your Embarcadero Center, 345 Cal, 555 Cal (pronounced Triple Five Cal, good buddy, come-on), 505 Monty, and the TransAmerica Pyramid at 600 Monty. Hai, chiizu!

Happy Holdays and Merry Christmas!

“Telstar Logistics is Marginally Prepared!” – A Lecture about Earthquake Preparedness on YouTube from the State of CA

Tuesday, November 22nd, 2011

Check it:

“In this week’s episode of Totally Unprepared, we visit the San Francisco home of Telstar Logistics founder, Todd Lappin, and his daughter Miel. Our host Ron Haralson quizes Todd on his earthquake preparedness, and takes he and Miel for a ride in the Big Shaker.”

All this is brought to you by the California Emergency Management Agency, the California Earthquake Authority, and the Alfred E. Alquist Seismic Safety Commission.