Posts Tagged ‘tnc’

UBER Lyft Driver Takes a Break in a Busy Geary Crosswalk to Fiddle with a Dash-Mounted Cell Phone – OH WAIT, IT’S AN SFMTA TAXI DRIVER

Monday, October 23rd, 2017

IDK, he might have stopped two spaces later, in a metered spot, if it hadn’t been taken. And I know he would have parked one space later, by the hydrant in a red zone, if it hadn’t been taken.

But no, he’s in the crosswalk, for a good long time, talking minutes here, and then it’s dash-mounted cell phone this and cell phone that, just like an UBER Lyft driver:

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I can’t recall seeing such UBER-ish behavior from a regular licensed cabbie.

There’s no radio dispatcher, it’s all app-based these days? Seems that way.

Back in the day, he’d have double-parked on Geary for the ten seconds it takes to offload and then have been on his way.

My, how things have changed in Frisco…

Yet Another Way That UBER and Lyft are Just Like Taxis: Rooftop Light-Up Advertising Panels

Thursday, October 12th, 2017

It’s come to this:

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Now you can have some entertainment when you’re stuck in UBER / Lyft-related traffic…

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The next frontier in advertising will be Lyft Blimp no doubt.

Lyft Driver vs. (Car-Free) Sunday Streets

Tuesday, September 12th, 2017

Not sure how dude managed to get himself smack dab in the middle of Sunday Streets Western Addition 2017, but here he is, with a few WTF stares and at least one whatsamatteryou hand gesture:

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And then more gesturing, as seen with this official Volunteer, and dude was off up Baker, which I think was his goal from the beginning:

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(I should say that this amount of yelling and whatnot is a lot mellower than when out-of-town drivers saw a Critical Mass Friday night bicycle parade for the first time, like on Market, back in the day…)

Anyway, that’s how a Lyft driver reacts upon seeing a Sunday Streets for the first time.

City Attorney Dennis Herrera Seeks Court Orders Requiring Uber and Lyft to Follow the Law

Friday, July 21st, 2017

IMO:

  • I’m not sure if it’s the job of the City Attorney to “strike the right balance” betwixt UBER / Lyft convenience vs. traffic congestion.
  • This Travis Kalanick sentence is the highlight: “I had hoped with the changes to its leadership that Uber had reformed its corporate culture.” Not necessarily sarcastic, but it has a bite nevertheless.
  • If a San Francisco taxi driver tells you to get lost because s/he doesn’t want to take you all the way out to the Sunset (which would make money for the driver, just maybe not as much as expected, or as average) or says, “I don’t take people to the Potrero projects,” well that’s a misdemeanor called Failure to Convey. IDK if is this kind of law applies to UBER Lyfters right now. Anyway, that’s what they’re getting at with the talk of discrimination.
  • Oh, and the reason why UBER started here in the Frisco bay first has to do with longstanding SFMTA policies of taxi regulation. Late night ballers such as Travis K had a bear of a time getting home at night – at 2:00 AM on a weekend night sometimes you’d see hundreds of people within a block of Broadway / Columbus with their arms up trying hail a cab. This had to do with a taxi shortage what valued certain people more than the general taxi riding public.

JMO

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Anyway, just released:

Herrera seeks court orders requiring Uber and Lyft to follow the law – Herrera moves for court to enforce his subpoenas requiring Uber, Lyft to turn over records on safety, disability access and operations

SAN FRANCISCO (July 21, 2017) — City Attorney Dennis Herrera announced today that he is requesting court orders to compel Lyft, Uber and two Uber subsidiaries to comply with subpoenas issued on June 5, 2017.  The subpoenas were issued as part of the City Attorney’s investigation into whether ride-hailing companies are creating a public nuisance in San Francisco.

Herrera today filed petitions in San Francisco Superior Court seeking a court order requiring the companies to comply with the subpoenas. The subpoenas are aimed at ensuring Uber and Lyft’s estimated 45,000 drivers in San Francisco do not create a public nuisance by jeopardizing public safety, discriminating or otherwise violating local and state laws.

The administrative subpoenas seek four years of records in eight categories, including miles and hours logged by drivers, incentives that encourage drivers to “commute” to San Francisco from as far away as Fresno or Los Angeles, driver guidance and training, accessible vehicle information, and the routes taken by these drivers in San Francisco.

Herrera is turning to the courts after giving the companies multiple opportunities to comply with the subpoenas.

“Unfortunately, Uber is doing what it always seems to do: raise obstacles and drag its feet— all while continuing to flout the law,” Herrera said. “To its credit, Lyft was more responsive, but in the end they also raised unreasonable roadblocks. They provided a minimal amount of documents before deciding not to comply with the rest of our request. And they have so far failed to execute a confidentiality agreement that would protect any legitimate trade secrets.  From the beginning, we have been clear that the companies must comply with these subpoenas.  These motions are the next step in protecting the rights of the people who live and work in San Francisco.”

On June 22 Herrera won a court ruling requiring Uber to comply with a separate subpoena from Treasurer José Cisneros to help ensure that Uber drivers have business licenses. The court found Uber’s arguments unpersuasive in that case.

San Franciscans and city leaders alike are concerned with public nuisance, public safety, accessibility, discrimination, compensation and other issues arising from the explosive growth of companies like Uber and Lyft.  Herrera issued his subpoenas as he investigates these issues.  He has also requested information about congestion and environmental impacts.

“The status quo is not working,” Herrera said.  “There’s no question that Uber and Lyft offer convenience.  But convenience for some cannot trump the rights of every San Francisco resident and visitor, including the safe enjoyment of our roads and bike lanes. I’m trying to strike the right balance here.  ”

After the subpoenas were issued, Lyft contacted the City Attorney’s Office and worked with the city to try to craft a confidentiality agreement that complies with the subpoena and with public records law, while also protecting trade secrets from public disclosure.  Lyft ultimately was not willing to move forward with a satisfactory agreement, demanding unreasonable provisions.

Uber objected to the subpoenas and refused to produce any documents or data at all. It waited until the June 20 deadline to send a letter telling the city it was declining to produce the information but would be available to “meet and confer regarding Uber’s concerns.”  After that, Uber representatives were slow to meet, late to respond and then non-committal. They have failed to comply with the subpoena.

“Uber was stalling,” Herrera said.  “I had hoped with the changes to its leadership that Uber had reformed its corporate culture. So far, that doesn’t seem to be the case. Both Uber and Lyft were given ample opportunity to follow the law. They chose not to, so now we’re in court.”

Additional documentation from the case is available on the City Attorney’s website at:https://www.sfcityattorney.org/

A Question for UBER, Lyft and SFO: How Much Crap is Too Much Crap for Car Windshields? – Obstructed Views, By Design

Thursday, June 29th, 2017

The FasTrak transponder isn’t the issue, it’s everything else, occluding vision near the starboard A-pillar:

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The other issue is with all this AUTHORIZED TNC VEHICLE regalia is that it seems to make drivers feel that they are special, entitled.

(And if you’re still reading SFO, why not lengthen your runways and put them farther apart, you know, make your setup conform to federal regulations instead of what ended up happening, which was making federal regulations conform to deficient SFO?)

That is all.

UBER Lyft Weekend Update: OMG, Please Please Please Learn How to Drive in Frisco

Monday, May 1st, 2017

So here’s an UBER Lyfter from Only God Knows Where (Merced? Santa Cruz? IDK) who’s taken the opportunity to block the fast lane of traffic going the opposite way on Masonic with his ride? See him there?

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So yeah, this is a legal turn (currently) and you’re allowed to wait in your own lane, but you’re not allowed to plant the front of your car into the oncoming lane, right?

Of course, yet another UBER Lyfter was doing the same thing in the southbound lane in a kind of TNC paux de deux, but that’s no excuse and that driver could look forward to a break in traffic, but you can’t, in part, due to the line of traffic you created yourself. So you block two lanes of traffic until your light turns yellow and even you realized that’s it’s time to complete your turn.

What’s that, you need to turn here? Well, obvs, but you’re doing it wrong and for no reason. Wait in your own lane, Dude.

What’s that, you just started driving here and/or there’s a 90% chance you’ll be moving on from this gig afore year’s end, so even if you learned how to drive in Frisco, it won’t help with whomever replaces you? Well, you got me there, Travis. You got me there. Moving on…

To this. So UBER Lyfter in the red car here on Pine is being told by GPS to turn left now, but get this, the driver is in the middle lane and whoops, there’s traffic, like the white car UBERer you can see. What’s the solution? Simply come to a dead stop in the middle of Pine, patiently signalling your intent to turn left. If this takes like ten seconds, well who cares, because you need to turn left here.

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Anyway, that’s just part of the weekend.

UBER Lyft drivers, welcome to Frisco, but you all are FAILING, and in a big way. Try harder to stay outta the way when you visit the 415…

An Uber / Lyft Prius Hits a Pedestrian and Somehow Winds Up on the Shoulder of Inbound I-80 Near Pinole? – And Is This a Private Investigator?

Monday, April 3rd, 2017

As seen Friday afternoon, a few klicks southwest of Pinole:

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The Prius on the left has UBER and Lyft trade dress. It appears to have hit somebody at speed.

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The very similar Toyota Prius Hybrid on the right could be a fellow TNC driver, or an accident investigator the kind of which taxi companies send to accident scenes sometimes.

What happened here is a mystery to me.

2017 Update: Hey, are UBER / Lyft Drivers Complying with California’s New “Trade Dress” Requirements? No, Not Really

Wednesday, February 1st, 2017

Sometimes all you get is something like this…

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…instead of something in the back window as what’s required.

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Some drivers refuse to comply, oh well.

What Happens When You Hail an UBER / LYFT to an Address Like 525 Market? – Temporary Chaos, That’s What

Wednesday, November 2nd, 2016

Market in the Financh is down to just one lane, in parts, these days, right? So you can’t just stop and wait for your fare to come down an elevator, right? Frisco aint Tracy, CA, right?

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After getting yelled out by Bike To Work Day, Uber driver from the South Bay scooched on over enough to let more people squeeze by.

It’s just not possible to legally pick riders up like this, sry.

On It Goes…

Untz Untz Untz Untz: LYFTED – Everybody’s a Brand These Days, Even This Dedicated Lyft Driver

Wednesday, July 1st, 2015

Presenting the “Discolyft theme car”

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I’m guessing this Lyfter doesn’t moonlight for Uber…