Posts Tagged ‘trains’

The OTHER West Portal, Sunset Tunnel, 94117

Wednesday, November 5th, 2014

I’d never noticed this before, this WEST PORTAL sign near Carl and Cole just outside of the Sunset Tunnel

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Do people drive their bikes and cars through this thing?

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People do.

Oh, So _That’s_ What the Central Subway Looks Like – A Giant Hole in the Ground at the Foot of Stockton – “Don’t Dig There!”

Thursday, June 27th, 2013

The Central Subway project might make sense politically (let’s take money from taxpayers from all over America to pay for a big project in our little-big city), but it doesn’t make sense from a transit standpoint.

Down down we go, under Market Street, under the MUNI Metro, and under the BART. When you pass by, you should crumple up all your ones and fives on you and throw them into this sinkhole because that’s what you’re already doing and what you will be doing far far into the future.

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Oh, what’s that, “transit justice,” they say? Well, most of the victims of this project live in San Francisco and most of them aren’t caucasoids, so I don’t know what the fuck that phrase means in the context  of this ridiculous scheme.

The project promotes transit justice by providing reliable, efficient, and safe transit for those who live in Chinatown and those who want to visit Chinatown.”

Does City Attorney Dennis Herrera believe this bullshit? No. Does Supervisor Scott Wiener? No. How about closeted Republican Supervisor Mark Farrell? No. How about Board of Supervisors President David Chiu? No.

Oh well.

Don’t dig there and dig it elsewhere
You’re digging it round and it ought to be square
The shape of it is wrong, it’s much too long
And you can’t put a hole where a hole don’t belong

The Hole in the Ground” was a comic song which was written by Myles Rudge and composed by Ted Dicks. When recorded by Bernard Cribbins and released by EMI on the Parlophone label in 1962, it was a hit in the UK charts.[1][2]

The song is about a dispute between a workman digging a hole and an officious busybod y wearing a bowler hat. This exemplifies English class conflict of the era and Cribbins switches between a working class Cockney accent, in which he drops his aitches, and a middle class accent for the gentleman in the bowler hat.

OMG, “Playland at the Conservatory” is Totally Awesome – Annual Garden Railway Show Has Beach Ephemera

Friday, November 18th, 2011

Get all the deets right here, and here at the Richmond District Blog, and below.

This show will run through April 15, 2012.

Check it, Playland at the Beach ephemera:

All photos by Nina Sazevich – click to expand

“Take a trip down memory lane as a bygone era of seaside amusement comes to miniature life in this season’s Conservatory of Flowers garden railway exhibition

November 18, 2011 ­ – April 15, 2012

Step right up for a ride back in time as the Conservatory of Flowers presents an all new garden railway display celebrating the legendary Playland at the Beach and a bygone era of seaside amusement that was located on San Francisco’s West End. In a dazzling display landscaped with hundreds of dwarf plants, model trains and trolleys wend their way past the famed Sutro Baths, zip around a replica of the Victorian-era Cliff House and whiz through a fantastic mini version of San Francisco’s beloved Playland at the Beach. 

Playland at the Conservatory, the conservatory’s 4th Annual Garden Railway, is an entirely new layout that resurrects the heyday of San Francisco’s west end, an area that flourished as a destination for fun and thrills after a new railroad built in 1884 made travel out to the ocean affordable. A dozen San Francisco landmarks, now mostly lost to time, are recreated in miniature and set in a landscape of hundreds of dwarf plants that bring the rocky cliffs and sandy shores of the area to life. Sutro Baths, the fantastical 7-pool swimming complex built in 1896 by eccentric mayor Adolph Sutro, nestles under Sutro’s other attraction, the Cliff House, which he transformed in that same year into a 7-story Victorian chateau. 

No doubt the recreated Playland at the Beach will be the star of the garden railway. Young and old alike will marvel at the sight of Playland’s most famous attractions in miniature, all in swirling motion and bright with twinkling carnival lights, while the sounds of the arcade and even Laffing Sal’s boisterous voice transport visitors right back to the midway. Wee rollercoaster cars climb the steep tracks of the Big Dipper, Playland’s biggest thrill ride from the 1920s to the 1950s, while a mini Airplane Ride spins and spins in circles. Other attractions include the treacherous Diving Bell, the Fun House and Playland¹s famed food arcade where hungry revelers could grab an enchilada at the Hot House or a sweet at the Candy Factory. 

As in past years, these replicas are all creatively crafted in miniature from recycled and repurposed materials. Playland’s historic 1906 carousel was created from a discarded light fixture, a slide carousel and a record player. The individual cages of the Rock-O-Plane are made from old pencil sharpeners. 

The exhibit also includes real memorabilia and photographs from Playland and beyond in a fascinating display that tells the story of San Francisco’s lost ocean-front treasures. Original wool bathing suits from Sutro Baths, the toothpick amusement park made by San Quentin inmate Jack Harrington that was displayed in the museum at the Baths, a Dodger bumper car, an original Playland sign and more provide visitors with an engaging way to experience and learn about San Francisco’s past. Period arcade games offer a hands-on history lesson with a chance to get your future from Zoltar, step into a vintage 1960s photo booth or goof around in the fun house mirrors, while a special scavenger hunt spinning wheel is a great, interactive way for young children to explore the exhibit. Portions of the popular documentary “Remembering Playland” will also be showing in the gallery.”

All right, see you there!

Decorative Rocks Sure Make It Tough to Ride a Bike Down the Middle of the Embarcadero

Wednesday, October 27th, 2010

Man, these rocks sure make for a bumpy ride.

Whoever put them it ought to get fired.

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In the middle of the road,
Is my private cul de sac.
I can’t get from the cab to the curb,
Without some little jerk on my back,
Don’t harass me kid,
Can’t you tell I’m going home, I’m tired as hell,
I’m not the cat I used to be,
I’ve got a kid, I’m thirty-three baby.
Get in the road.
Come on now,
In the middle of the road.

The MTC is Super-Excited About the Recent Increase in Clipper Card Use in the Bay Area

Tuesday, September 21st, 2010

Our Metropolitan Transportation Commission is pleased as punch because people are using Clipper cards more these days.

Especially MUNI riders, but aren’t they sort of being forced into using Clipper?

Anyway, here’s the gritty nitty. Go MUNI, Go!

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And here are the deets, for your big-whoop file:

Clipper Card Usage Climbing Rapidly

OAKLAND, Calif., Sept. 20 — The number of Bay Area transit riders using Clipper to pay fares on buses, trains and ferries rose to an average of 139,725 during the four weekdays following the Labor Day holiday. This marks a 16 percent increase from the roughly 120,225 average weekday boardings during the week ending September 3, and a jump of more than 100 percent since the formal launch of the Clipper card in mid-June.

San Francisco Muni, which carries the largest number of transit passengers in the Bay Area, also is registering the largest number of daily Clipper boardings. Muni accounted for an average of  57,750 Clipper boardings during the four regular workdays ending Sept. 10. This was followed by BART with 41,975 weekday boardings; and AC Transit with an average of 26,175 Clipper boardings each weekday. Smaller numbers of passengers used Clipper cards to board Golden Gate Transit & Ferry, Caltrain and Dumbarton Express vehicles.

Muni is nearing completion of a year-long project to replace aging fare gates throughout its Muni Metro station network with new gates that will only accept Clipper cards. The roughly $29 million initiative includes the installation of new ticket vending machines, through which customers can purchase new single-use Clipper cards. Installation is now complete at the Civic Center and Powell Street stations, with the finishing touches underway at the Castro, Church Street, Embarcadero and Forest Hill stations. Installation work is expected to begin next week at the Van Ness and West Portal stations.

The Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC), which oversees the Clipper program, is working with participating transit agencies and with program contractor Cubic Transportation Systems Inc. to solve several customer service problems exposed by the rapid growth in Clipper card usage. These include a shortage of experienced front-line staff at the Clipper Customer Service Center; hardware problems that are hindering proper clock synchronizationon the Clipper card readers installed on 43 buses operated by AC Transit, Golden Gate Transit and San Francisco Muni; and software integration of some “business rules” created by the myriad combinations of fare policies established by the Bay Area’s more than two dozen separate transit agencies.

Ever more deets after the jump

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Come See the Popular Golden Gate Express Exhibit at the Conservatory of Flowers

Monday, January 12th, 2009

Well, all aboard the Golden Gate Express Exhibit at the Conservatory of Flowers in San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park.

Check it out, click to expand:

Life imitates Art – the model TransAmerica Pyramid burns its lights all the live long day, just like the real thing:

See you there!