Posts Tagged ‘transportation’

Stand-Up Paddle Skateboarding in Golden Gate Park – The Latest Thing for Our Panhandle Bike Path

Thursday, August 27th, 2015

Push push push yourself to work:

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New Electronic Arts Corporate Bus “Wrap” Allows You to Meet EA’s Characters – A Family Portrait

Thursday, July 23rd, 2015

First I’ve noticed this one:

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I like it better than this one, which, in any event, reminds me of the Deflate-gate cheaters…

Boosted Skateboards are Everywhere These Days – Catch the Wave – Would You Pay $1500 for an Electric Skateboard?

Wednesday, July 8th, 2015

Attention youth – instead of riding fucking MUNI about town, why not pilot something what’s [Simile Mode: ON] like a supercar, like a fighter jet AND like a snowboard?

Carve like a snowboard. Accelerate like a supercar. The boosted board combines the world’s most powerful light electric drivetrain with a Loaded longboard for amazing hill climbing, precise carving, and revolutionary braking. Riding a Boosted board feels like flying an electric fighter jet. Our award-winning electric drivetrain propels one of the world’s best longboards up incredible hills at speeds up to 22 mph and can brake the board to a complete stop even while going downhill. Proprietary control technology lets you limit power so you can comfortably learn before you graduate to the world’s most powerful board sports experience. You will feel like you’ve carved a snowboard through fresh powder every day of the year, whether it’s with your friends or on your way around town. See why the press calls it a dream to ride and one of the best feelings of motion I’ve ever experienced. PERFORMANCE SPECS – Max Speed: 22 mph – Range: 7 Miles – Power: 2000W – Uphill Climbing: 25 Percent Grade – Powerful Braking: Regenerative – Charge Time: 60 min – 4 Modes: Beginner 8 mph 8+ miles : Eco 16 mph 7 miles : Expert 20mph 6 miles : Pro 22 mph 4.5 miles PRODUCT SPECS – Weight: 15lb – Truck Width: 10in – Wheel Size: 75mm – Deck Length: 38in – Deck Material: 100% Bamboo”

You’ll look like this:

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Is this The Future?


A modern day warrior
Mean, mean stride
Today’s Tom Sawyer
Mean, mean pride

Though his mind is not for rent
Don’t put him down as arrogant
His reserve, a quiet defense
Riding out the day’s events
The river

Exit the warrior
Today’s Tom Sawyer
He gets high on you
And the energy you trade
He gets right on to the friction of the day

The Difference Between a Serious Safety Organization Like the NTSB and Our SFMTA – “Toward Zero” vs. “Vision Zero”

Monday, March 16th, 2015

(Remember Gavin Newsom’s Vision from 2004 of Zero homeless people on the Streets of San Francisco by 2014? How did that work out? Oh, there are more now? Oh

So now we have a New Vision Zero – SFGov has banned all transportation-related deaths and injuries in San Francisco starting in 2024 and continuing in perpetuity.

Compare that with our NTSB, which is a serious safety organization. It wants us to move Toward Zero. See?

See the difference? One goal is attainable and the other is pie-in-the-sky from the get-go.

Hey, what’s the SFMTA’s record of turning tax and feepayer money into transportation safety? Not so hot, right? The SFMTA is good at creating more “work rules” for its employees, but it’s not so hot on its actual core functions.

And how is the SFMTA going to change to do better, to “achieve” its impossible to achieve goal?

Nothing. It’s planning on doing the same old same old, a “streetscape” project here and another streetscape project there, political district by political district.

Hey, does the NTSB have politics? Yes, yes it does, unfortunately. But it’s not mired in le politique the way our SFMTA is.

And here’s a bonus – the chances of any particular NTSB worker killing me on the streets of San Francisco are remarkably low. Compare that with the chances of me getting killed by an SFMTA employee are what, 20-30%, you know, assuming I get killed on the streets of San Francisco.

So why not this, SFMTA? Why not take Vision Zero 2024 SF and start with SFGov employees, starting now?

You see, SFMTA, transportation safety isn’t a problem with the lack of “safe” streets, it’s a problem with the behavior of people.

The way you’re trying to do affect the behavior of people is the most convoluted imaginable. Sorry.

Anyway, if you changed your project’s name to Toward Zero, you’d have a chance at success.

If not, then you don’t.

An Update on CAR2GO Car Sharing in SF: The Giant FREE PARKING Logos are Gone

Tuesday, December 23rd, 2014

Read all about it. So how does this work, you see a car and then you use it to get wherever and then you park it legally and then you’re done with it? Mmm…

As seen on Fell in December 2014:

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All right, I’m making this an ASSIGNMENT DESK.

So, what is CAR2GO. Why didn’t the corrupt SFMTA approve of it back in 2013, when it greenlighted a bunch of other transportation schemes? What happened to the FREE PARKING words on the sides of the cars? (One imagines that could be a touchy issue for those in the City Attorney’s Office.) What’s the status of it now in the 415?

So many questions!

Now You Can Protest Your Unfair SFMTA MUNI DPT SFBC Ticket Online – One Weird Trick – Here’s Your Link

Friday, November 21st, 2014

Via SF Bay’s Transportation Writer Jerold Chinn, here’s your link, Baby!

It’s New, it’s You. It’s Now, it’s Wow.

Of course, most of the citations handed out by the SFMTA MUNI DPT SFBC (oddly, the SFMTA/SFGov gives a lot of money to our local San Francisco Bicycle Coalition, so it acts as an arm of the government these days. Oddly) are handed out “fairly.” And I would even go as far as to say that most of the tickets protested as “unfair” were handed out fairly as well.

OTOH, there are some SFMTA employees who do bad things – they steal multiple $6 cable car fares each and every day or they say you parked for more than two hours in an RPP zone when you didn’t. And then the official SFMTA spokesmodels bend over backwards to say that no SFMTA employees ever do anything bad ever. EVER!

(And considering how often these spokesmodels get their facts wrong, well … oh well. Bygones.)

Here’s your screenshot:

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Good luck, Offenders!

“Online Citation Protest

Step 1 of 6

This website allows you to protest one citation at a time.
As part of the review process, you will be allowed to upload 3 documents to help us in our decision-making process.
Do not use your browser’s back arrow to navigate or you will need to start over.

Citation Number: where to find

Per the California Vehicle and Public Utility Code, you may have only one review per citation within the statutory time limits.
While in the process of protesting your citation, additional penalties will not be added to the violation.

Technical Support for Online Services
If you need help or have questions about this service, please complete this form or call 311 (415.701.2311).”

Help Break the SFMTA’s Secret Shuttle Bus Code: Send in Your Photos of the ID Numbers You See on All Those Buses

Wednesday, October 22nd, 2014

This older post from Nitasha Tiku of ValleyWag might be a bit out of date, as I know some of the codes listed there don’t match what I’ve been seeing IRL.

This is what I’m talking about here:

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So, “Loop Transportation Inc” uses SFMTA code “07” – are there other names for this outfit? I know not. Anyway, they have at least 74 vehicles, one assumes (based upon observations).

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Here’s the list:

1. Bauer’s IT
2. Sunset Development/Bishop Ranch
3. Black Tie Transportation
4. WeDriveU
5. SFO Airporter
6. Royal Coach Tours
7. Lux Leasing
8. Storer Coachways
9. MV Transportation
10. LOOP Transportation
11. Corinthian

So if you see a bus that has a different code than what you see here, take a photo and send it in to the email address you see on the top of this blog. Or really, I don’t need a photo, I just need to know the Pilot Program ID number and then the “Operated By” info on the side of the ride.

Then I’ll look into things and then post an updated list complete with the highest bus number observed and then I’ll post it for tout le monde to see. (I don’t know why the SFMTA considers this info so supr secrt but it does.)

And of course, if you have some big beef against some bus, what you’re supposed to do is call 311 and then tell them the five-digit code so they can take action, if necessary. That’s the system, baby.

Seen on the Street: Two Lies and Then, Finally, The Truth – “Pure Luxury Transportation”

Wednesday, April 9th, 2014

What I’m saying is that I don’t know where the luxury part is from.

Is what I’m saying.

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The Cyclists of the 280 – Legally Riding Your Bike on “The Most Beautiful Freeway in the World,” San Mateo County

Monday, December 2nd, 2013

Yes, the 280, the Junipero Serra, aka the Most Beautiful Freeway in the World.

Anyway, Brocephus here is using his bike on an onramp heading north.

And it’s legal. Check it:

Riding Your Bike on the Freeway in California: It’s Not as Illegal as You Might Think – As Here, on the 101 in Marin County

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Bicycle Fatality on the I-80 at University in Berkeley Raises the Question: Can You Ride a Bike on a Freeway?

Saturday, June 1st, 2013

Consider this morning’s news:

Katie Utehs ‏@katieutehs2h – All lanes of eastbound 80 blocked for bicycle vs. collision at University.

Is it legal to ride a bike on the freeways  of California?

No, not on the very urbanized part in Berkeley I don’t think.

But bike riding is legal on other certain stretches of freeway.

The details:

“We’re not talking about temporarily closing down a freeway to cars on Father’s Day like they did in Pasadena a while back, to the horror of Rob Anderson.

And we’re not talking about an illegal bicycle romp in traffic the way the Crimanimalz do it on the 405.

We’re talking about you legally riding your bike on the right side of some of California’s 4000 miles of freeway.

Well, according to the California Department of Transportation, maker of melty orange and blue cupcakes, sí, se puede. Yes, you can ride your bike on about 1000 miles of California freeway.

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For proof, check out this white sign in Marin County on the 101 South. You see? It says “BICYCLES MUST EXIT” so that means, assuming you didn’t ignore any “Bicycles Prohibited” sign, it’s all good for you to be on this stretch of freeway. Q.E.D. Res Ipsa Loquitur.

Here’s the CalTrans version:

Of the more than 4,000 miles of freeways in California, about 1,000 miles are open to bicyclists. These open sections are usually in rural areas where there is no alternate route. California Vehicle Code Section 21960 says Caltrans and local agencies may prohibit bicyclists from traveling on freeways under their jurisdiction and that they must erect signs stating the prohibition. There are no signs permitting bicyclists on freeways. When a bicyclist is legally traveling on a freeway, he/she may be directed off the freeway at the next off-ramp by a sign that says “Bicycles Must Exit.” The freeway will be posted at the next on-ramp with a sign that says “Bicycles Prohibited.”

And here’s the Vehicle Code:

21960.  (a) The Department of Transportation and local authorities,
by order, ordinance, or resolution, with respect to freeways,
expressways, or designated portions thereof under their respective
jurisdictions, to which vehicle access is completely or partially
controlled, may prohibit or restrict the use of the freeways,
expressways, or any portion thereof by pedestrians, bicycles or other
nonmotorized traffic or by any person operating a motor-driven
cycle, motorized bicycle, or motorized scooter.  A prohibition or
restriction pertaining to bicycles, motor-driven cycles, or motorized
scooters shall be deemed to include motorized bicycles; and no
person may operate a motorized bicycle wherever that prohibition or
restriction is in force.  Notwithstanding any provisions of any
order, ordinance, or resolution to the contrary, the driver or
passengers of a disabled vehicle stopped on a freeway or expressway
may walk to the nearest exit, in either direction, on that side of
the freeway or expressway upon which the vehicle is disabled, from
which telephone or motor vehicle repair services are available.
(b) The prohibitory regulation authorized by subdivision (a) shall
be effective when appropriate signs giving notice thereof are
erected upon any freeway or expressway and the approaches thereto.
If any portion of a county freeway or expressway is contained within
the limits of a city within the county, the county may erect signs on
that portion as required under this subdivision if the ordinance has
been approved by the city pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section
1730 of the Streets and Highways Code.
(c) No ordinance or resolution of local authorities shall apply to
any state highway until the proposed ordinance or resolution has
been presented to, and approved in writing by, the Department of
(d) An ordinance or resolution adopted under this section on or
after January 1, 2005, to prohibit pedestrian access to a county
freeway or expressway shall not be effective unless it is supported
by a finding by the local authority that the freeway or expressway
does not have pedestrian facilities and pedestrian use would pose a
safety risk to the pedestrian.