Posts Tagged ‘twitterloin’

How Mayor Ed Lee “Destroyed” Jobs at Sixth and Market – How Pearl’s Deluxe Burgers Didn’t Really Belong at 6th and Market

Tuesday, March 17th, 2015

See this place at 6th and Market? It catches the overflow from Dotties, the shop around the corner:

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It used to be Pearl’s Deluxe Burgers.

PDB was funded by and “Central Market Cultural District Loan Fund” and [cough] the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency*[R.I.P.]

Here’s the story of PDB:

2010: Pearl’s Burgers signs on to Mid-Market rejuvenation

2011: Pearl’s Burgers opens on Market

2014: Pearl’s Deluxe Burgers closes its location at Sixth and Market

PDB at 1001 Market Street wasn’t a good idea.

Whose idea was it?

Was it Mayor Ed Lee’s? Did he “create” jobs here? Well, take a look at the no-longer-operational pres release below.

Oh but look, Homeskillet arrives to save the day.

Shouldn’t it too get corporate welfare from tax and fee payers? Why not?

Why on Gaia’s Green Earth should we have the gov’mint picking winners and losers?

I don’t get it.

Shouldn’t the gov’mint focus on its core functions? Say, how’s SFGov functioning these days down at 6th and Market?

Anyway, bon courage, La Maison Skillet.

*Now I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds.

Mayor Lee Celebrates Central Market Milestone – 56 Jobs Created in Central Market by Companies Taking Advantage of New Payroll Expense Tax Policy

1/26/12—Mayor Edwin M. Lee today announced that businesses are beginning to take advantage of the City’s Central Market/Tenderloin Payroll Expense Tax Exclusion. Zendesk and Pearl’s Deluxe Burgers are the first of what is anticipated to be many companies choosing to locate in the Central Market and Tenderloin neighborhoods and take advantage of the six-year payroll expense tax exclusion for new jobs created.

Creating 56 new jobs in the Central Market area last year, both companies have now been issued conditional letters of eligibility, which allows them to continue to create new jobs, generate revenue for the City and transform Central Market.

“With the success of Pearl’s and Zendesk in Central Market and with the opening of Twitter this summer, I continue to be encouraged by the successes we are seeing. While we have more work to do, we can still celebrate milestones like this and the many small businesses and arts groups arriving in the area, generating new foot traffic and increasing positive activity in the area,” said Mayor Lee. “This is a historic opportunity to leverage the energy and momentum that is creating an eclectic cultural arts, small business, entertainment and innovation economy hub.”

The Central Market/Tenderloin Payroll Expense Tax Exclusion was created to help to stabilize and revitalize an area that has been burdened by decades of high vacancy rates and disinvestment. The policy was designed to attract businesses to Central Market and the Tenderloin in order to create jobs and stimulate small business development. By providing tax relief for new jobs the Tax Exclusion encourages San Francisco companies, particularly those that are fast-growing, to move to Central Market as their employee base expands.

Zendesk, a San Francisco-based technology company that provides cloud-based help desk software, announced they had signed a lease in the Central Market in June of 2011 and that they would be doubling their footprint in September of 2011, shortly after they moved in. Since that time, Zendesk has added 40 jobs and plans to add another 96 jobs in 2012, totaling 200 staff.

“Our move to 6th and Market streets in August has been a meaningful one, and we are honored to be one of what will hopefully be many companies to bring positive change and innovation to this neighborhood,” said Zendesk CEO Mikkel Svane. “We’re excited about being the first tech company to draft and now implement a Community Benefits Agreement, which will help us build and foster long-lasting and meaningful relationships with the residents, businesses, community leaders, and other neighborhood stakeholders in Central Market and the Tenderloin.”

As part of qualifying for the Central Market / Tenderloin Payroll Expense Tax Exclusion, Zendesk entered into a Community Benefits Agreement with the City earlier this week. The company has committed to implementing a number of programs that will benefit the neighborhood and its residents, including support for community gardens, job training programs, access to technology, and a commitment to engage local restaurants and business for event catering and other services.

In November 2011 Pearl’s Deluxe Burgers opened their fourth location in Central Market. The award-winning restaurant was able to locate in Central Market with help from the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency, a loan from the City’s Central Market Cultural District Loan Fund and the Payroll Expense Tax Exclusion. They have created 16 new jobs as a result of their new location.

“It is an exciting and historic time to do business in Central Market,” said Pearl’s Deluxe Burgers Owner Sylvia Yi. “Sixth Street is fast becoming a comfort food corridor, and we are lucky to be a part of it. Innovative incentives like the payroll expense tax exemption will continue to entice other businesses to our area and keep the entrepreneurial momentum going in burgeoning Central Market. Kudos to Mayor Lee and his office for their commitment to revitalize this neighborhood. It is happening with great speed and much success thus far!”

The attraction and expansion of large employers and small businesses to Central Market is a cornerstone of the Mayor’s recently-launched Central Market Economic Strategy, the result of a 10-month public process that has resulted in a comprehensive roadmap to stabilize, revitalize and transform Central Market. Enhanced safety services are one of the primary components of the Economic Strategy, which includes the City’s Central Market Community Safety Ambassadors Program. To read the Central Market Economic Strategy, go to: www.centralmarketpartnership.org.

Gothic Civic Center, Sunrise

Monday, March 16th, 2015

California Supreme Court and the 100 McAllister Building:

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SFGov Puts a Pedestrian “Bulb-Out” at an Intersection Where Peds Already Behave Very Poorly

Friday, March 13th, 2015

I’ll tell you, pedestrian safety means pedestrian safety.

But “pedestrian rights” means the opposite, it means letting peds go around willy-nilly and getting themselves killed.

Anyway, if you want to see peds jumping the green and standing around in intersections, head on over to McAllister and Hyde. Before it was bad enough, but now, peds will have a shorter distance to jaywalk?

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The last thing you want to do is embolden* the already-emboldened, right?

On It Goes

*BTW, there were peds improperly in the intersection at the time Chris Bucchere collided with Sutchi Hui. Perhaps all the peds in the intersection had jumped the gun. That intersection offers a very short path for peds – in some ways that’s a good thing, but in others that’s a bad thing, particularly at the intersection of 17th, Castro, and Market. Of course, Bucchere couldn’t have “entered the intersection legally” cause the limit there is 25 MPH. And of course, he made no effort to slow down once he recognized the problem. So of course, there’s enough blame to go around.

National Media Embraces the Term Twitterloin – First the New York Times and Now Fortune: “Welcome to the Twitterloin”

Monday, March 9th, 2015

Here’s the latest from Fortune:

Welcome to the Twitterloin, where tech-savvy cool meets gritty hood by Michal Lev-Ram

And that comes on the heels of this recent bit in the NYT:

As Wealth Changes the Tenderloin, a Move to Preserve Artistic ‘Gems’” by PATRICIA LEIGH BROWN

So what are the borders of the Twitterloin? Well, it depends.

For some, this portmanteau dating from 2009 means the Tenderloin itself, and others think it refers to a place at the southern* “edge of the city’s Tenderloin neighborhood.”

And then there’s this map of the “Twitter Tax Break” zone – it’s sort of shaped like the number 7:

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(Oddly, an unelected mansion-dwelling white man from the east bay played a signif role in creating the borders of this map. Isn’t that strange?)

And here’s a little more on the history of the Twitterloin:

Prospective Twitter Landlord Gave Newsom Rent Deal by Gerry Shih

Oh, does this information challenge your notions? Sorry.

And, Heaven forfend, this Forbes bit is coming after “we” agreed to put the term Twitterloin “to bed once and for all” just a few months back.

Sorry.

(Oh hai! You’ve worked in SF media for “years and years” and yet you’ve never even heard of the term “Twitterloin” until you saw it in The Grey Lady in 2015? Whoo boy, you don’t get out into the field all that much, huh?)

Oh what’s that, you’re from SFGov or a taxpayer-funded org and you don’t like seeing auslanders use the T-word because EVERYTHING IS AWESOME under the regime of WillieBrownGavinNewsomEdLee? Well here’s your map then:

Now there’s a T-word you can get behind, huh?

And, more seriously, if you’re new in town, then this semi-recent (and perfectly legal!) pizza delivery no-go map is your lodestar:

Basically if you’re looking for trouble, start at 6th and Folsom, you know, on foot, and then head northwest and then take Eddy west all the way to Divisadero in the North of NoPA area. I’ll add, Gentle Visitor, that you’re not going to get killed or anything if you wander throughout the aspirationally-named “Uptown Tenderloin*” but it might go a little something like this.

Or here’s a safer way to get about the Twitterloin.

In closing, here’s the latest from Italy:

“Da Tenderloin a Twitterloin: con i “techie” cambia lo storico quartiere

È storicamente il quartiere più malfamato di San Francisco, dove convivono homeless e gira droga, ma che è vissuto anche da graffitari, gallerie che propongono i lavori di artisti indipendenti, ‘food trucks’ (i camioncini che vendono cibo di strada), teatri leggendari e case di riposo che il comune destina alle persone con il reddito più basso, disoccupati e agli invalidi. Da quando sono arrivate le compagnie del “tech boom” che hanno scelto di stanziarsi dentro la città e lontane dalla Silicon Valley, il Tenderloin è stato però ribattezzato il “Twitterloin”: qui hanno sede le compagnie di Jack Dorsey, Twitter e Square, il quartier generale di Uber, e anche Yahoo! sta a poca distanza. L’arrivo delle grandi società sta cambiando rapidamente il volto del quartiere, spazzando via l’arte di strada e anche il carattere vibrante che per anni ha animato la zona. E, naturalmente, facendo aumentare in brevissimo tempo il prezzo degli affitti (testi e foto di Viviana Devoto e Kegan Marling).”

There’s your Twitterloin Update 2015.

*Cf. Tendernob, at the northern edge close to Nob Hill. 

Amici’s East Coast Pizzeria Still Refuses to Deliver to the Bad Parts of Northern SF, But Their Delivery Maps are Improving

Wednesday, February 25th, 2015

A little history here first. This was the Amici’s East Coast Pizzeria delivery map from a decade ago:

As you can see, the project-y parts of the Western Addition and Potrero Hill were no-go areas 24-7, while the Uptown Tenderloin / Twitterloin / 6th Street Corridor areas were no-go areas after dark.

Back then and even now, this kind of map is nice and legal, believe it or not. So, in Frisco, if a cabbie refuses to take you to The Projects (or even to The Avenues), s/he is guilty of a misdemeanor called Failure to Convey, but if a pizza deliverer refuses to bring food to the projects, well, that’s A-OK. Moving on….

To this, the map that’s been used for most of the past decade – it’s pretty much the same thing:

And now here are the current maps – first for the Mission Bay location on King Street:

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Wow, this is much improved. The 6th Street part of the Twitterloin is back on the map as well as Potrero Terrace and Potrero Annex (those are per Jay Barmann – I am not familiar with these terms as I’ve never really been to the Potrero PJ’s area, the place where former Mayor Art Agnos got shot).

Of course it could be that Amici’s never delivers to these places – maybe it’s up to the individual drivers who are working at the time, IDK. Anyway, there’s nothing wrong with this map, you know, per se.

And now we come to the current map for the Marina District Amici’s:

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Realize that there are smaller federal housing projects included in this map, but the areas carved out still include a broad swath of the Western Addition and, of course, the SRO-laden Northern Twitterloin containment zone.

So there you have it – redlining in San Francisco circa 2015.

Tech-Bros Lord Over 6th and Market in the Twitterloin, with Aeron Chairs and Giant Apple Monitors

Thursday, February 12th, 2015

As seen in the gritty Twitterloin tax enterprise zone, from 20 feet below, down at 6th and Market.

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Truly, they are masters of their domain, plus they have a nice view of all the dysfunction down below.

Can the Managers of the New 100 Van Ness Apartment Building Get Away with Making “Security Deposits” Non-Refundable? We’ll See

Monday, February 2nd, 2015

Click on “Lease Now” to see this:

“*To reserve your new home, please click the “Get Approved” button above to complete our rental application and start the screening process. You will be required to submit a payment of $35.00 for the non-refundable Application Fee and the Security Deposit of $500-$1000 for the apartment is due within 72 hours by drop off or overnight mail. After three days from the date of application, the Security Deposit is non-refundable.”

Well, first off, “home.” Like, it’s not even a condo, man. How about “apartment” instead?

And second off, I ain’t never paid no nonrefundable application fee. What you do is ask how much the  credit / eviction check costs them and then offer to pay that. If that’s a no-go, then perhaps you shouldn’t move in? (I realize that building employees have to deal with flaky people all the time, but I’m not the flaky people category, I don’t think.*)

What really grinds my gears is the idea of any building manager talking about any kind of “non-refundable” deposit. Such a deposit does not exist under California law.

Check it:

(m) “No lease or rental agreement may contain a provision characterizing any security as “nonrefundable.”

You want to quibble? Fine, quibble, but this non-refundable status is agin the law, agin the law I tells you!

Most people in Cali can market apartments without prima facie violations of Cali law. So why can’t you, 100 Van Ness? Why can’t you?

Just asking.

Oh what’s that, what’s $35 to somebody who thinks moving into the Outer Twitterloin at $4000 for a one-bedroom is a good idea? All right, well, maybe it’s not a good idea to move into this building. Realize that most of the non-BMR people are probably not going to renew after their first year (just like at the abysmal “luxury” Fillmore Center apartments near Japantown, where you can pay thousands and thousands per month in rent, and for what). So, why are so many people going to move out of 100 VN after just a year? Think on that. Part of the reason might have to do with dealing with the 20-somethings in “building management.” Are they going to come in and say, uh oh, you walked on our cheap, brand-new hardwood flooring in high heels so here’s a bill for $7,000 for reflooring? Maybe. (Stuff like that happens just around the corner of 100VN all the time.) And there’s the nabe, which might wear you down over the months. OTOH, maybe this building is a dream come true for you, right next to Van Ness Station and not too far from the Civic Center BART Station. Fine, be my guest. Enjoy. But the same 20-something chicas who don’t understand why it’s not kosher to expropriate four-figure “Security Deposits” in the Great State of California just might not be aware of all the other laws what protect you.

Oh, what’s that, it’s OK to retain a “holding deposit?” Well, we aren’t at that point yet, because you all labeled it a “Security Deposit.” I’m now satisfied that you all don’t know what you’re doing. Welcome to Cali, 100VN Management. It’s going to be a bumpy ride…

END OF LINE

*Like the last time I bought a car, I didn’t even test drive it. No salesperson neither – the “big guy” had to assign a salesperson to me at the end of the sales process in order to “get the transaction to go through.” This sales process took about seven minutes. Later on, the salesperson had to “orient” me. I asked for the 30-second version of his 20-minute spiel. It was basically this: “Never press this button.” And I’ll tell you, that was good advice. I had already figured the downsides of pressing the button and if I hadn’t, then I would have figured things out fast, like during the times that I pressed that button by mistake. In any event, what he meant was, never press this button unless you know what it does and the conditions are right for it.  The point is that I’m not a flake so I never pay no nonrefundable application fee and you shouldn’t either. Sometimes, like back during Dot Com 1 in the late ’90’s, landlords would harvest thousands of dollars in application fees for just one unit over one weekend. Did the LLs actually run the checks potential tenants paid for? Nope. That’s what made it a scam. A nice, four-figure, income tax-free scam. These days, they charge you $35 to run a check that costs them even less than before, like a few bucks max. Oh well.  

Corrupt Twitterloin Update: “Beyond Chron” “Editor” and SFGov Contractor Randy Shaw Strongly Objects to SFPD’s Redistricting Plan

Wednesday, January 28th, 2015

So, taxpayer spending on the ineffective Tenderloin Housing Clinic empire is up 2000% the past couple decades and what has that gotten us? Why don’t other cities do things the way we do in the Tenderloin – why is SF so unique in this regard. Why doesn’t Randy Shaw lay out how his operations benefit the city of San Francisco? No, not interested in doing that, Randy? Oh, but you sometimes spend your time threatening to sue the San Francisco Chronicle, the very “Chron” you’ve promised to get us “Beyond?” And you’re too busy singing the praises of San Francisco’s weakest-willed Mayor since … forever? OK fine.

Let’s check in on the latest in the Twitterloin*

“SF’S FOCUS TURNS TO CRIME”

One assumes this is Randy Shaw being aspirational, as they say. For example, here’s Randy Shaw from 2007: “By the summer of 2008, going “uptown” in San Francisco will mean heading to the Tenderloin.” But that’s not what uptown meant in 2008. And it’s not what it means now in 2015. So that’s just an example why whenever Randy Shaw says something, it’s not true. Randy Shaw says that the focus of the entire City and County of San Francisco is now turning to the topic of crime in 2015 – that means that the focus of the entire City and County of San Francisco is NOT now turning to the topic of crime in 2015, it’s just what Randy wants people to believe, for some reason.

“San Francisco’s economy is booming. But many are upset about crime. This is particularly true in the Tenderloin, where residents, merchants, workers, and thousands of children confront public drug dealing on a daily basis.

Public drug dealing from the residents of the residential hotels promoted by … Randy Shaw.

Why does the city allow such flagrantly illegal activities?

I don’t know, like why does the city throw $20 million a year down the Randy Shaw rathole?

After all, the Tenderloin is finally bouncing back from fifty years of decline and there are rising expectations for its future.

Again, if Randy Shaw says that the Twitterloin is bouncing back, that means that’s what he says all the time, going back decades, and it means that it’s not true. You’ll just have to take his word about expectations, and who has them.

It used to be that the Tenderloin attracted drug dealers because the city allowed them to do business there. It was a crime “containment zone,” with the entire criminal justice system backing a policy which forced low-income residents to walk down unsafe streets.

Well, that’s still kind of the case now, right Randy?

Mayor Ed Lee made it clear after taking office that the Tenderloin’s days as a crime containment zone were over.

But it’s still a containment zone, right? Hey, did I mention about how much money the Randy Shaw Twitterloin empire gets from SFGov every year? What does he do for that money? Wouldn’t we be better off just stopping giving him all that money and starting over? And shouldn’t City workers be doing Randy’s job?

And his intervention, along with resident activism, resulted in the biggest positive transformation of any single block in San Francisco.

So isn’t this where Randy Shaw should mention that he’s a government contractor from Berkeley and that’s why he sings the praises of who(m)ever is the Mayor of San Francisco? No, OK. And BTW, the unit block of Turk hasn’t really been “transformed.” It’s just where the Randy Shaw empire has a storefront, that’s why it’s such a BFD to RS.

This was through the elimination of over 100 drug dealers who used to work daily on the first block of Turk Street.

Elimination? Were they all executed by Ed Lee? Oh no, they’re still around, and some of them live in hotels of the Randy Shaw empire? OK fine.

On January 28 at 6pm at the Kelly Cullen Community Center at 220 Golden Gate, the Police Commission holds a hearing on proposed new boundaries for the Tenderloin police district. The Police Commission faces a choice between two very different visions for the Tenderloin’s future. In the vision backed by nearly all residents, merchants, workers and community stakeholders, the new boundaries will keep the Tenderloin together and target police resources where public drug dealing regularly occurs.

All right, now here’s real life: Most residents of the Tenderloin, nearly all of them, aren’t objecting to the SFPD redistricting itself as it sees fit. And I’m not sure what Randy means when he talks of the new boundaries. The new boundaries are what the SFPD is proposing, it’s what Randy Shaw super doesn’t like.

In the vision embodied in the SFPD’s proposal, the national Uptown Tenderloin Historic District is divided among three police districts.

But there isn’t any “national Uptown Tenderloin Historic District,” not IRL. That’s just a designation that Randy Shaw wanted.

It takes historic Tenderloin SROs like the Hotel Union at 811 Geary, the Hartland Hotel at 909 Geary, and the nearby Elk Hotel at 670 Eddy, and puts them outside the Tenderloin police district.

So what, Randy? How does it matter? Hey, don’t you live in Berkeley?

At the same time that core blocks in the Tenderloin are excluded from the “Tenderloin” station, the new district adds shoplifting-heavy Westfield Cente. It is located at 5th and Market, well outside the Tenderloin. The new “Tenderloin” station includes Market Street as far down as 3rd Street and  continues to Market and Van Ness before heading south as far as the intersection of Mission and South Van Ness.

What’s the obsession with maps? Why should the SFPD concern itself with what a Berkeley resident thinks about maps?

Critics of the SFPD plan understand that it is only a draft, and that the January 28 hearing is designed for public feedback.

It’s what the cops want, so shouldn’t they get it? Is there some sort of constitutional issue here? I don’t think so. So you let the cops do the job as they see fit. We want the cops to perform well, right? So why micromanage them? The “draft” map is exactly what they want, right? Oh, Gentle Reader, you have a beef with the SFPD over Some Other Issue? Well that’s different than redistricting, right? Let’s say you don’t want the SFPD to institute an unconstitutional Stop and Frisk program, you know, like the one that Mayor Ed Lee proposed after coming back from New York. Opposing something like Stop and Frisk is not micromanaging, not at all. But nitpicking over district borders is.

Because Tenderloin folks (myself included) were not paying attention in 2007, we allowed Little Saigon (Larkin from Eddy to O’Farrell) to be excluded from the Tenderloin district boundaries drawn that year.

Randy Shaw, you isn’t “Tenderloin folk,” you is longtime mansion-dwelling Berkeley Hills folk, right? Who cares what the borders of the Tenderloin are considered to be? Why does it matter?

If Westfield Center joins the still under construction Market Street Place in the Tenderloin District, the crime priorities of Abercrombie & Fitch, Nordstrom’s and J Crew will prevail over drug dealing on Leavenworth Street.

Well that’s what Randy Shaw says, but it’s not true.

Police will not ignore powerful retail interests whose sales taxes fuel the economy in order to protect seniors and kids walking on Leavenworth Street from drug dealing.

Is this what they call “framing?” IDK. It’s something, anyway. Are there a lot of cops patrolling the malls in SF? I don’t think so.

No police chief is going to throw big national retail chains under the bus by refusing to allocate police to arrest shoplifters. 

Or local chains, or convenience stores – pretty much if you call the SFPD to haul away shoplifters, they’ll go and haul them away, right?

Randy Shaw is Editor of Beyond Chron. His book, The Tenderloin: Sex, Crime and Resistance in the Heart of San Francisco, will be out this spring.

Oh, there’s sex in the Twitterloin? And there’s crime in the Twitterloin? Wow, thanks for writing the book, Randy. I can hardly wait for it…

*And that’s a New York Times-approved word. How will Randy Shaw occupy his time in the future, will he start up a Beyond Times newspaper and install himself as Editor-For-Life?

Advice for San Francisco Newcomers: What’s “Rent Control?” It’s Something You Might Want – Not Now, But Next Year

Friday, January 2nd, 2015

Or not. It’s hard to say how much rent control would benefit you next year once your lease is up.

But these days, there’s a ton of SF newcomers who are just figuring out the big benefit of RC.

Check it:

“Unfortunately most residents can’t afford to stay longer that 1 year. We’ve been living at Argenta for 10 months and have been very happy with the apartment. But we began to suspect that things weren’t quite right with management shortly after moving in. People we met in the elevator, lobby and our floor were all saying the same thing — rent had been raised to ridiculous heights and they were moving out. Over the last 10 months we have watched many of the tenants on our floor leave because of the rent increase.”

So that’s what you get with your brand-new building – a huge rent increase after your first year.

Generally speaking, older buildings have rent control and newer buildings do not. One exception is federal land, like Treasure Island and The Presidio. In those places, you can live in an older building but still get with huge rent increases.

Of course, it always pays to check.

Here’s a test – can you tell which places are rent controlled?

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You see, it’s hard.

Choose wisely.

Argenta Inquest: How Can a One-Bedroom Apartment in the Twitterloin Qualify as a “Luxury Home”

Thursday, December 4th, 2014

That’s the Question of the Day.

Here it is, the Argenta, at 10th and Market on 1 Polk Street:

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$107K* per year(!) for a one-bedroom – am I reading that right?

I mean, wouldn’t have a second bedroom be a kind of luxury in itself?

*”From $8920” a month times 12 months in a year…